A Landing a Day

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Cottonwood, Idaho

Posted by graywacke on February 23, 2010

First timer?  In this (hopefully) once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  My seventh-straight western state (and 12th of my last 13 landings) . . . ID; 43/31; 5/10; 1; 152.4.  Here’s my landing map:


And this, the broader view:


Here’s my GE shot, showing what appears to be a lovely mixed forest/grassland scene:


Here are a couple of oblique GE shots, from different directions.  They show that I landed on a plateau.  This, from the south:


And this, from the west:


The deep valley you see in the forground is that of the Salmon R (11th hit); on to the Snake (65th hit); on to the Columbia (130th hit).

So, I couldn’t find much about Cottonwood.  One thing that’s all over the Cottonwood internet images is this:


From weirdomatic.com”

In Cottonwood, a small town in Idaho, a giant dog stands at a crossroads. Standing at 10m high, “Sweet Willie” is the largest beagle in the world and the exterior of the Dog Bark Park Inn. Willie is unlike anything you’ll have ever seen before: inside his belly there is a double bed, small kitchenette and dining area with a view out of his eyes, whilst the bathroom is housed in his rear. The unusual furnishings – such as bedside mutt mat, carved doggie bed head and “Dog-opoly” – mean that those without a sense of fun may want to skip this hotel.

Cottonwood is home to an elegant Catholic monastery, St. Gertrude’s:

From Wiki, about St. Gertrude herself:

Gertrude was born January 6, 1256, in Eisleben, Thuringia (within the Holy Roman Empire, a Germanic “State”). Nothing is known of her parents, so she was probably an orphan. As a young girl, she joined the Benedictine monastery in Helfta, under the direction of its abbess, Gertrude of Hackeborn. She dedicated herself to her studies, becoming an expert in literature and philosophy. She later experienced a conversion to God and began to strive for perfection in her religious life. She had various mystical experiences, including a vision of Jesus, who invited her to rest her head on his breast to hear the beating of his heart.

St. Gert’s was founded in Oregon 1882 by Sister Johanna Zumstein.  It moved to Washington and finally to Cottonwood in 1907, where it was built on land was donated to the Church.  Here’s Sister Zumstein’s picture:


Moving right along:  Railroad trestles are a big thing in this part of the country.  Here’s a shot of the famous wooden trestle at Cottonwood:


A few miles north is this larger steel trestle (the Lawyers Canyon trestle):


This from VisitIdaho.org about Lawyers Canyon:

This canyon along Lawyers Creek in the middle of the Camas Prairie was named for a Nez Perce Indian. Hallalhotsoot was nicknamed Lawyer by area mountain men because of his shrewd mind and combative nature.

I’ll close with this shot looking out the back of the caboose going over the Lawyers Canyon trestle:


I’ll bet a right of passage for local teenage boys is to cross this trestle on foot . . .

That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

One Response to “Cottonwood, Idaho”

  1. You found what Cottonwood is most known for – the big beagle at Dog Bark Park & the monastery a few miles from town. We invite you and your readers to come experience the dog – where being in this dog-house is a good thing! http://www.dogbarkparkinn.com.
    We enjoy your blog – a way to learn something new everyday!

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