A Landing a Day

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Archive for April, 2010

Almo, Idaho

Posted by graywacke on April 29, 2010

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  Phew.  I just missed the big time OSer UT, but managed to land in its northern neighbor, my longest-time USer . . . ID; 45/51; 5/10; 12; 150.7.  Here’s my landing map, showing my proximity to Almo, Moulton, the City of Rocks (near Almo) and the ID/UT border:


Here’s a broader view:


Here’s an oblique GE shot (looking northwest), showing that I landed in an area with a variety of landscapes.  The City of Rocks is in the valley beyond my landing.


I stepped way back (and am looking south toward the Great Salt Lake, visible in the distance) to get this shot:


I couldn’t find much of interest outside of the “City of Rocks.”  (Note that this is my second such “city.”  The first was near my Gooding ID landing, 2/9/09).

Here are a couple of GE Panaramio pictures:

From Wiki:

The City of Rocks , also known as the Silent City of Rocks, is a U.S. National Reserve and state park lying two miles north of the south central Idaho border with Utah.

The City of Rocks is a popular rock climbing area. Climbers in the region refer to the area as simply ‘The City’.

The California Trail passed through what is now the City of Rocks. Wagon trains of the 1840s and 1850s left the Raft River valley and traveled through the area and over Granite Pass into Nevada. The names or initials of emigrants written in axle grease are still visible on Register Rock. Ruts from wagon wheels also can be seen in some of the rocks.

Here’s a shot from Panaramio of Register Rock:


From Wiki, this about the geology:

The landscape of City of Rocks has been sculpted from granite that was intruded into the crust during two widely spaced times. The granite that composes most of the spires is part of the 28 million year old Almo pluton. However, some of the spires are made of granite that is part of the 2.5 billion year old Green Creek Complex that contains some of the oldest rocks in the western United States. The granite has eroded into a fascinating assortment of shapes.

Here’s a picture (taken by Mike Reid) of the Twin Sisters formation:


And this, about the above formation, from a National Park Service website:

Distinctive landmarks such as the Twin Sisters formations are one of many spectacular sites in the Reserve.

One Sister is 100 times older than the other.  The mythical qualities of this unusual place all contribute to the vividness that makes the City of Rocks a memorable scenic landscape.

Are you kidding me?  One spire is 100 times the age of the other?  Let me check – yup – one is about 25 million years old (a mere baby) and the other is 2.5 billion years old!  Geologically, there must be a story behind the story – but lucky for the both of us, I won’t do any more research . . .

That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

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Parker, Arizona

Posted by graywacke on April 27, 2010

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  Gee, just as I’m about to at least catch a whiff of 150, along comes a long-time WB OSer . . . AZ; 76/70; 5/10; 11; 151.3.

Here’s my landing map, showing proximity to Parker and the Colorado R (and California):


Here’s a broader view.


Obviously, I landed in the Colorado R watershed (151st hit).  Here’s my GE shot, showing a desert landscape:


Here’s a broader GE shot, showing the irrigated Colorado River valley:


Here’s a Street View shot.  My landing is about three miles away:


So, what about Parker?  Here’s a 1942 shot of the town:


From Wiki:

Founded in 1908, the town was named for Ely Parker, the first Native American commissioner of Indian Affairs for the U.S. government.

From Wiki, about Ely:

Ely Samuel Parker (1828 – August 31, 1895), was a Native American of the Seneca nation who was an attorney, engineer, and tribal diplomat.

Ely Parker was quite an interesting fellow.  From a PBS website:

Ely Parker was born in 1828, during a jouncing, 30-mile buckboard ride as his parents sped home to their Tonawanda Reservation in western New York. Elizabeth and William Parker called their new son Ha-sa-no-an-da, translated from Seneca as “Leading Name.” They would raise him within in the traditions of the once-dominant League of the Haudenosaunee (also known as Six Nations or Iroquois).

But the 18th and 19th centuries brought rapid change that would define Ha-sa-no-an-da’s early years. As white settlements pressed in on Tonawanda, Elizabeth Parker sent her son to a Baptist Mission school where he could get a mainstream education. There, Ha-sa-no-an-da gained a new identity; he adopted the first name of the school’s minister and began calling himself Ely Parker.

Back to  Wiki:

Parker was commissioned a lieutenant colonel during the American Civil War, where he served as adjutant to General Ulysses S. Grant. Later in his career Parker rose to the rank of Brevet Brigadier General. President Grant appointed him Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the first Native American to hold that post.

Parker was present when Confederate general Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse in April 1865. He helped draft the surrender documents, which are in his handwriting. At the time of surrender, General Lee mistook Parker for a black man, but apologized saying, “I am glad to see one real American here.” Parker was said to respond, “We are all Americans, sir.”

Back to the PBS website:

As his political power increased in the nation’s capital, so did criticism from the Tonawanda Senecas. They accused him of neglect, and his 1867 marriage to a white socialite named Minnie Orton Sackett did little to bridge a widening cultural chasm. Ely Parker was in metamorphosis; he was rejecting Haudenosaunee tradition and aligning himself with white America.

Parker’s attitudinal shift became part of national policy in 1869 when President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him Commissioner of Indian Affairs. He was the first American Indian to hold that office, and became the administrator of the Peace Policy that was a hallmark of Grant’s administration. Parker’s support for military force was controversial, but within a year the Indian Wars were reduced to sporadic outbreaks.

Despite early successes, Parker’s term as Commissioner was brief, his fall from grace orchestrated by a political foe who accused him of misconduct. An 1871 Congressional committee cleared him of all charges of fraud, but the Commissioner was stripped of his powers. In August 1871 Parker resigned his post, leaving politics and Washington forever.

Ely and Minnie moved on to Fairfield, Connecticut, where they started a new life in a story-book setting. Parker became a businessman, with daily commutes to New York City where he made fortunes on Wall Street. But within five years, the fortunes he made were lost. 1876 found the former Indian Commissioner at loose ends, with few doors of opportunity left open.

With his Wall Street fortunes lost, Ely Parker simply moved on. He tried to reenter engineering, but found his skills were out of date. “The profession ran away from me,” Parker wrote. “Young men were wanted for their activity, and the old men were discarded.”

In 1876, Parker finally found a steady job as a desk clerk with the New York City Police Department. It was his final career, one with little responsibility and very modest pay. When Minnie Parker gave birth to the couple’s only child, Maud, in 1878, Ely became a devoted father.

Then another woman entered Parker’s life: a poet and student of the Haudenosaunee named Harriet Maxwell Converse. Their friendship revived Parker’s interest in his traditional culture. He began to question his life’s path, and to assess the price of walking in two worlds. Although he regretted many of his actions, his spirit was rekindled.

Parker spent his last years on earth battling kidney disease, diabetes, and a serious of strokes. In 1895, he went to bed early and died in his sleep.

In 1897 his body was re-interred in Seneca homelands in western New York, next to the grave of the Seneca orator Red Jacket.

Moving right along . . . although not mentioned above, I landed in the watershed of the Bouse Wash, which is named after the town of Bouse.  Near Bouse is an interesting Indian artifact, the Bouse Intaglio.

Here’s a picture of the intaglio and the photographer’s caption below (from El Kite’s photostream on Flickr).  Note that the photographer took this photo using a kite:

Ancient geoglyph known as the Bouse Fisherman, in the desert north/east of Quartzite, Arizona, USA.  The fisherman figure is inverted, that’s just how it was shot. The figure appears to be standing in water, spearing fish, under the sun.  Nobody’s really sure who made this or why, but it’s assumed to be about 1,000 years old. It was “discovered” – along with several other larger geoglyphs on the California side – 80 years ago by a pilot flying over the Colorado River.  See full-size Doberman Pinscher in upper-left of the shot for scale.  I used a kite to fly the camera.

Here’s another  picture of the intaglio:


And this, an artist’s rendition of the same:


I was curious about the word “intaglio.”  From Wiki:

Intaglio refers to a number of techniques in art, applied to many different materials, which all have in common that the image is created by cutting, carving or engraving into a flat surface, as opposed to a relief, where the image is what is left when the background has been cut away to leave the image above the background.

Here’s quite the shot of a lightening bolt (with the photographer’s caption below):


A very early morning strong thunderstorm that hit Parker, AZ around 2:30am in the morning Aug 30th 2008. Incredible lightning over the Colorado River. Took these photos from my dock on the Parker Strip in Parker, AZ   Uploaded by: riverratmike

Here’s a picture of the Colorado R near Parker:


And this, from quite near my landing spot, this picture by Mandy Cardone:


I’ll close with this lovely shot by Eric Sande of a sunset over the Colorado at Parker:


That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

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Clayton, New Mexico (Revisited)

Posted by graywacke on April 25, 2010

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  I landed in a crowded corner of a solid USer – specifically, the NE corner of . . . NM; 67/76; 6/10; 10; 150.9.  I’ll start with an expanded landing map, showing the crowded corner (today’s landing is the one closest to Clayton):


I had to title this post “Clayton Revisited,” because I referenced Clayton for the fairly recent (Valentine’s Day 2010) landing, which is the one south of today’s landing.  But since I landed even closer to Clayton today (and there is no other nearby town), I felt I had no choice but to visit Clayton again.

Anyway, here’s my more traditional landing map:


For the 36th time, I landed in the Canadian R watershed, on to the Arkansas (101st hit); on to the MM (739th hit).

Here’s my broadest view:

And here’s my GE shot, showing a dissected arid landscape.


So, a couple of months ago when I landed near Clayton, I highlighted Black Jack Ketcham, a ne’er-do-well cowboy who was hanged (hung?) in Clayton.  This time around, something else caught my geologist’s eye.  From the University of California, Museum of Paleontology (UCMP.berkely.com):

In the northeastern corner of New Mexico, twelve miles north of the town of Clayton, an earth dam was constructed in the 1970s across Seneca Creek that resulted in the formation of Clayton Lake. The excavation of the spillway, and a flood in 1982 that swept away a layer of silt from the spillway, uncovered an unexpected bonanza of dinosaur tracks, preserved in the Early Cretaceous sandstones of the upper Dakota Group, dated at about 100 million years old. Today, the tracksite, with over five hundred dinosaur footprints preserved, is one of the main attractions at Clayton Lake State Park — and one of the best-preserved and most extensive dinosaur tracksites in the United States.

Here’s a picture of the tracks, from Tom & Jennifer Polakis:


Back to the Berkely website:

The Dakota Group consists of rocks that formed along the western shore of the Western Interior Seaway, a shallow oceanic strait that in Cretaceous time connected the Gulf of Mexico with the Arctic Ocean.

Here’s a map of the Seaway:

These rocks were laid down in lakes, rivers, and river deltas, as well as the sea. Dakota Group strata extend from central New Mexico more or less northward through Colorado to southern Wyoming. In the area marked by dinosaur footprints on the above map, the Dakota Group of rocks are rich in dinosaur tracks and trackways.

These tracks are given added importance by the fact that no dinosaur bones have been found in this part of the Dakota Group; the tracks are the only evidence that dinosaurs once lived in the region. Clayton Lake is at the south end of what has been called the “Dinosaur Freeway”, along the western edge of the seaway (Clayton Lake is shown as the larger track).

The most common tracks at Clayton Lake, and indeed throughout the “Dinosaur Freeway”, are broad, three-toed tracks like this one:

The largest of these tracks is about thirty centimeters in length, from the tip of the middle toe to the rear.  In all likelihood, tracks like the one shown here were made by iguanodontid dinosaurs, whose best-known representative is Iguanodon.

The track shown here represents a hind foot impression.  Iguanodons had large hind limbs and smaller forelimbs.  This track, and countless others like it, show the larger track with an associated smaller track, visible here to the left of the main track. These are impressions of the forefeet.

Here’s a picture of an iguanodon:


Nasty looking  “thumbs,” eh?  And this, to give you an idea of scale.


Here’s a picture of a reconstruction of the bones in his “little” fore foot.


I’d love to head on over to Clayton Lake and see the tracks.  It would be pretty amazing to be standing there looking at a moment in time from 100 million years ago . . .

I’ll close with this picture from Brian Morganti, taken outside of Clayton, from his “best of 2006” Storm Effects photo album:


That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

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Birdseye, Utah

Posted by graywacke on April 23, 2010

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  I almost dipped below 151, but ‘twas not to be as another old-time WB OSer showed up . . . UT; 68/52; 6/10; 9; 151.5.  Here’s my landing map, showing my proximity to two previous landings.  Note the dates I’ve placed next to each landing:


So, for the third time (not surprisingly), I landed in the Dry Creek watershed, on to the Thistle Creek watershed (also for the third time); on to the Spanish Fk R (5th hit, making the Spanish Fk the 140th river on my list of rivers with 5 or more hits); on to the Jordan R (6th hit); on to the Great Salt Lake (12th hit).  Of course, the Great Salt Lake goes nowhere.

Here’s a broader view:

Here’s my GE shot, showing that I landed in a mountainous area that looks pretty well forested.  In the far distance is the Great Salt Lake (which is about 25 miles away):


For my 5/21/08 landing, I referenced Indianola (although it looks like I could have referenced Birdseye, as I did today).  Anyway, Dan, here’s an excerpt from my email to you for that landing:

“From Wiki:

Indianola is an unincorporated town in Sanpete County, Utah, United States, east of U.S. Route 89 at Thistle Creek and twelve miles southeast of Fairview.  An early Indian village existed there and in pioneer times the site was selected for an Indian reservation.

Are you kidding?  An early Indian village, and then selected by white folks to be an Indian reservation.  And then, what do those white folks decide to call it?  How about Indianola?”

So, that’s what I said back then.  Anyway, it turns out that the very next day, I landed very close by.  Here’s part of my 5/22/08 email to you:

“Dan –  Oh my LG!  What an amazing landing!!  The statistical coincidence (anomaly?) is truly overwhelming.   Yesterday’s lat/long:  39.8778 / 111.4861.  Today’s lat/long:  39.7960 / 111.5697.  Dan, take a look at those numbers.  Oh yea:  UT; 51/40; 5/10 (0/3); 17; 173.0.  One more thing, before I landed in UT, I had two AOs and one MX.   Beyond that, I’m speechless . . .”

Enough old business.  I decided to reference Birdseye for this landing.  From Wiki:

Birdseye is a community in southeastern Utah County, Utah located on the back of the Wasatch Range along U.S. Highway 89.

Birdseye was settled in 1885 and originally named “Summit Basin” and later “Clinton”. The present name “Birdseye” was chosen because of the nearby birdseye marble located in the quarries near here.

Hmmm.  Interesting geology, maybe.  A little research revealed this, an article written by Carl Ege, Utah State Geological Survey:

Approximately 58 to 66 million years ago (Paleocene epoch), a large body of water known as Lake Flagstaff covered parts of northeastern and central Utah. This lake deposited a sequence of sediments that formed rocks known as the Flagstaff Formation.

Although these rocks are technically a limestone, the building stone industry has termed this deposit a “marble.” The rocks are rich in algal ball structures commonly known as “birdseyes.” These birdseye features were formed by algae that grew around snail shells, twigs, or other debris. The algae used these objects as a nucleus, forming into unusual, elongated, concentric shapes.

[From the article, here’s a picture of unpolished “birdseye marble]:


At the entrance to the gravel road, a sign is posted for the Birdseye Marble Quarry, which is under claim and closed to all collecting.  Don’t let this discourage you because the Birdseye Marble Quarry is not part of our “collecting area.”

Here’s a picture of the sign (take time to read it!):


I love the line “ANYTHING MEANS ANYTHING.”

From UntraveledRoad.com, a little more about Birdseye marble:

The stone polishes to a high degree and is prized by jewelers and builders. Stone from the quarry is in the Utah State Capitol, the Mormon Chapel in Washington, D. C., the Lincoln Memorial, and other state and federal buildings.

Here’s a picture of some polished Birdseye Marble specimens:

Here’s a picture of beautiful downtown Birdseye:


I’ll close with this nice landscape shot from near Indianola:


That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

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Cape Canaveral, Florida

Posted by graywacke on April 21, 2010

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  I’m having trouble getting back into the swing of every-other-day landings; it seems like the older I get, the more complicated life is.  Enough about me!!  How about the landing?  Well, today, I can celebrate a solid USer landing . . . FL; 27/40; 6/10; 8; 151.0.  FL is the number two USer (behind TX, of course), but it is number one in terms of percentages.  What I mean is this:  27 (number of FL hits)/40 (number of hits I should have based on area) = 0.675.  TX is 133/164 = 0.811.  So even though it would take more TX landings to get to PS-land, FL is further out of whack . . .

Here’s my landing map, showing my proximity to Titusville, Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center:


Here’s a broader view:


I’ve long casually noted the serious bulge on the east coast of FL, but never realized that the bulge is Cape Canaveral!

Here’s my GE shot, showing that I landed in a marshy area.  The major road to the west is none other than good ol’ US 1 (the NJ version of which lies about 7 or 8 miles east of me as I type):


Here’s a Street View photo taken from Route 1, looking east towards my landing (which is about one quarter mile away):

Here’s an expanded GE shot, so you get a good view of the Cape:


FYI, the straight white line SSE of my landing (the one that points right towards my landing) is the shuttle runway.

So, I landed in the watershed of the Turnbull Creek (which is very obvious on my close-in GE shot).  Here’s a picture of the Turnbull where it crosses under Route 1:


The Turnbull flows into a new river, the Indian “River.”  I put river in quotes because the Indian is the waterway along the mainland coast that you see south of my landing (note Indian River City, which is right along the Indian River).  From Wiki:

The Indian River is a waterway in Florida, a part of the Indian River Lagoon system which forms the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. It extends from the border between Brevard and Volusia Counties southward along the western shore of Merritt Island, then continuing southward to St. Lucie Inlet.

It was originally named Rio de Ais after the Ais Indian tribe, who lived along the east coast of Florida.  It is broad, shallow, 153 miles (246 km) long. It is an estuarine system where freshwater meets salt water within the same body of water.

Speaking of the Indian River, it gives its name to a citrus-growing district.  Note that the Wiki piece below references Captain Dummitt who founded Dummit Grove (see small town along Rt 3 SSE of my landing on my landing map).  From Wiki:

The colorful history of the Indian River Citrus District goes back to 1807, when Captain Douglas Dummitt, sailing south along the Florida East Coast smelled the fragrance of orange trees and was determined to find these trees and to secure some for his, not yet established, homestead.  On the East Bank of the Indian River, north of Titusville, Captain Dummitt and his family settled on what is known today as the north end of Merritt Island, Florida.

Immediately after the cabin was built, and his family safely secured, Captain Dummitt left to find the trees with the fragrance he enjoyed so much.  The orange trees that he found and planted at his homestead were to be the first-known citrus grove in what is today the “Indian River Citrus District.”  Even now some of these original trees may be found at the original site of the Dummitt house.

From that modest beginning, the Indian River Citrus District began to grow and by the turn of the century, many more groves had been established up and down the Indian River area.

I stumbled upon a 1926 article written by a C.A. Bass about Captain Dummit’s orange grove:


The gist of the article is that this grove is the oldest surviving orange grove in Florida.  The article begins with a letter, not from the author, but from one Ralph Robinson, who is lobbying some State historical committee about making the grove a historical landmark.  The letter is actually very interesting:


The article itself is less interesting, although I found something in the article that made my jaw drop.  I’ve copied the passage so you can read it.  Keep in mind that the author, Mr. Bass, is a government employee:


Wow.

Moving right along, here’s some Cape Canaveral history (from Wiki):

In the early 16th century Cape Canaveral was noted on maps, although without being named. It was named by Spanish explorers in the first half of the 16th century as Cabo Cañaveral or Cabo Cañareal, which literally means “Cape Canebrake” (a canebrake is a dense thicket of cane vegetation).

The name “Canaveral” is one of the three oldest surviving European place names in the U.S.

[The other two old names are Florida and Tortugas, as in the Dry Tortugas, at the western end of the Florida Keys.]

The first rocket launch from the Cape was Bumper 8 from Launch Pad 3 on 24 July 1950. On February 6, 1959 the first successful test firing of a Titan intercontinental ballistic missile was accomplished here.  NASA‘s Project Mercury and Gemini were launched from Cape Canaveral, although the Apollo program and Space Shuttle missions have launched from Kennedy Space Center on adjacent Merritt Island.

Cape Canaveral was chosen for rocket launches to take advantage of the Earth’s rotation. The linear velocity of the Earth’s surface is greatest towards the equator; the relatively southerly location of the Cape allows rockets to take advantage of this by launching eastward, in the same direction as the Earth’s rotation. It is also highly desirable to have the downrange area sparsely populated, in case of accidents; an ocean is ideal for this. Although the United States has sites closer to the equator with expanses of ocean to the east of them (e.g. Hawaii, Puerto Rico), the east coast of Florida has substantial logistical advantages over these island locations.

From 1963 to 1973 it was called Cape Kennedy. President John F. Kennedy set the goal of landing on the moon. After his assassination in 1963, his widow Jacqueline Kennedy suggested to President Lyndon Johnson that renaming the Cape Canaveral facility would be an appropriate memorial. However, Johnson recommended the renaming not just of the facility, but of the entire cape. Accordingly, Cape Canaveral was renamed Cape Kennedy.

Although the name change was approved by the United States Board on Geographic Names of the Interior Department in 1964, it was not popular in Florida, especially in the city of Cape Canaveral. In 1973 the state passed a law restoring the former 400-year-old name, and the board went along. The Kennedy family issued a letter stating they “understood the decision”; Jacqueline Kennedy also stated if she had known that the Canaveral name had existed for 400 years, she never would have supported changing the name. The NASA center, Kennedy Space Center, retains the “Kennedy” name.

Here’s a shot of a deserted stretch of beach at the Cape Canaveral National Seashore:

I’ll close with this gotta-have-it shot of a Shuttle launch, probably looking across the Indian River:


That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

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Lewistown, Montana

Posted by graywacke on April 16, 2010

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  Gee whiz.  My first landing after the long layoff (my last landing was leftover from before vacation), and where do I land?  For the third time in the last 12 landings, I’m simply adding to the OSness of the number one OSer . . . MT; 110/90; 5/10; 7; 151.6.  Here’s my landing map, showing a bunch of teeny towns along with a much larger town (Lewistown):


Here’s a broader view, showing that I landed smack dab in the middle of the OS king:


I landed in my 22nd “Indian Creek” watershed, on to the Judith R (3rd hit); on to the Missouri (347th hit); on to the MM (738th hit).

Here’s my GE shot, showing that I just missed some farm fields and landed on the edge of a minor “badlands” area:


So, I really couldn’t find much on Lewistown, except that one Reeves Highwheeler (a Lewistown native) has put together a wonderful archive of old photos from all over Montana, but a lot that focus on Lewistown.  He posts on SmokStak.com, which is generally about old engines (“Antique Gas Engine Bulletin Board”).

Obvioiusly, Reeves (who fancies steam engines) decided to post a bunch of pictures that may or may not have anything to do with engines.  I’ve posted his pictures along with his captions:


Milwaukee Railroad Locomotive #2027 is shown on the east side of Lewistown’s original ‘Montana “Jawbone” Railroad’ Depot at First Avenue South and Brassey Street. A portion of this 1903 depot still stands there.

This is a photo of Metis Indians at Lewistown, Montana in the 1890s with covered carts. Photo courtesy of my friend, the late George Brenner.

Jerkline freighting outfit at the corner of 5th Avenue & Broadway street in Lewistown, Montana. The building behind the wagons was the Hickey Blacksmith shop

This is a picture of the Fort Benton to Lewistown stage, loaded and ready to leave. Notice both stage coaches are a three bench seat mud wagon. I don’t know off hand what the building is in the background.

This is a stagecoach that has just arrived at Lewistown, Montana in front of the Lehman Brother’s store there.

Here’s a shot of the Fergus County Poor Farm, posted by Nancy Watts from the Lewistown Public Library, with the caption beneath:

“We do not have much information on the [Fergus County] poor house. It was called the County Poor Farm and was started in 1890 as a County rest home and Hospital. They cared for indigent patients. They raised all their own meat and produce. They closed July 1, 1965.It was located on Lower Spring Creek. In the photograph above, the Reed & Bowles Trading Post is on the left of center.”

I’ll close with some nice scenery photos from around Lewistown (from the town’s website, DestinationLewistownMontana.com).  (The mountains in the background are the Judith Mountains.)

That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

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Ashland, Maine

Posted by graywacke on April 14, 2010

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  Avoiding the boring old 152s, I landed in one of the most consistent USers; along with TX, ID and FL is . . . ME; 20/22; 6/10; 6; 151.2.  Here’s my landing map, showing that I landed very close to a previous landing (today’s landing is on the right).  The previous was landing 700, back in September of 2005:

Here’s a broader view, showing that I landed way the heck up there:


Here’s my GE shot.  It looks to me like I landed in timber country – and that I landed right in a recently-logged patch, even. Notice how you can see some patterns amongst the trees – I assume this is the way the timber companies have planted them.


Here’s a broader (oblique) GE shot looking north.  That’s the St. Lawrence in the distance.  Up here near ME, the Canada border runs on this side of the St. Lawrence.


For the second time, I landed in the Machias R watershed (obviously, the other landing being the one shown on my landing map); on to the Aroostook (2nd hit); on to the St. John (5th hit, making the St. John the 140th river on my list of rivers with 5 or more hits); on to the AO.  Here’s a Street View shot of the Aroostook just outside of Ashland:


So, Ashland.  Boy, try as I might, I’ve never had a harder time finding something of interesting about my landing spot.  Given the length of time between posts, I could say that I’ve been working for two weeks to find something worthy to write about, but that wouldn’t be true.

The truth is that I was down at our house in Eleuthera (www.TheCayHouse.com), where, at least for now, we don’t have internet service.  But it is beautiful there.  Here’s a picture of the beach from the house:


And this, of the house from the cay (island) out front:

So, would you like to rent?  Check out the website.  (Sorry about the shameless advertisement . . .)

Anyway, back to Ashland.  This is sad, but all I could find was this census from 1837 (with a typo – note that the Daltons should have 9 in the family, not 7).


I’ll close with the statement that I’m sure Ashland is a wonderful little town inhabited by great people, and no doubt that somewhere on the internet is some information about Ashland that would be way more interesting than the 1837 census.  So, if anybody out there is from Ashland, comment on this post and tell me where I can find something interesting about your lovely town . . .

That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

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