A Landing a Day

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Eagletail and Little Horn Mountains, Arizona

Posted by graywacke on July 3, 2010

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  The misery continues . . . AZ; 77/71; 3/10 (1/7); 4; 152.4.  Here’s my landing map.  Today’s landing is the southern-most, showing that I landed far from anything (the closest town is Hope, more than 22 miles away):


Here’s a broader view:


Although the drainage is a little uncertain (with streams that seem to end here and there), it pretty much looked like water at my landing (if there was enough of it) would head south and end up in the Deadman Wash watershed; on to the Clanton Wash; to Farmers Canal; to the Gila R (33rd hit); to the Colorado (153rd hit).

Deadman Wash is my 7th stream with “dead” in it.  “Dead” doesn’t quite make my official list of Common Stream Names (I need 8 to make the list).  But I did compile a list of the names anyway:  Three Dead Rivers (2 in ME, one in MN); one Dead Colt Ck (ND); one Dead Horse Ck (WY) and one Dead Stream (ME).

I’m going to break from tradition, and not feature any town for this post.  I am so out in the boonies, that I’ll feature the two mountain ranges (the dark splotches) on this GE shot:

To the north and east are the Eagletail Mountains (and home to the Eagletail Mountains Wildnerness Area); to the southwest are the Little Horn Mountains.

Here’s a view looking SE towards the Little Horn Mountains (the low ridge in the foreground):

Here’s a GE shot looking east towards the Eagletails (just past my landing) and well beyond:


Here’s a little about Eagletail from Arizonensis.org:

Eagletail Mountains Wilderness is a vast desert preserve located about 130 km west of Phoenix. Included in the area are magnificent mountains including stately Courthouse Rock, sheer cliffs, deep canyons, desert plains, bighorn sheep, desert mule deer, reptiles, and an extensive desert flora. Hikes of one day or several via backpack are possible. Desert solitude and beauty will immediately surround the adventurer. No cars. No buildings or utility poles. Out of cell phone network.

Here are some pics:

I found this story about a “lost mine” in the Little Horn Mountains:

The story of the Lost Mine of the Little Horn Mountains springs from an act of kindness. During the early 1800’s, the sleepy Spanish province of California was governed by a man named Juan Bautista Alvarado. Years later, after he retired, Alvarado moved to the Gila River valley in Arizona. Alvarado proved to be a friend to the neighboring Tonto Apaches. That friendship was not easily earned but this kind man won over the local Indians with his generosity. Eventually that kindness was repaid by one of the Tonto warriors. One day the Indian presented Alvarado with several rich gold-bearing specimens of ore and offered to lead the old Spaniard to “the richest mine in the world!” The ore was native gold in a rusty, dark red matrix and was very rich indeed.

Somewhere near the Little Horn Mountains, the Indian led Alvarado to a ledge of heavy, reddish ore studded with gold. Unfortunately, this was Alvarado’s only trip to the mine. He was simply too old to develop it himself, but his son tried many times to find the ledge. He was never able to locate it, nor has anyone else.

Damn!  I hate it when that happens!  Anyway, the one photo I could find of these mountains is this, of the “Royal Arch:”

I’ll close with this sunset/cactus shot of the Eagletails:


That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2010 A Landing A Day

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