A Landing a Day

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Archive for October, 2011

Screven, Georgia

Posted by graywacke on October 29, 2011

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-a-week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  Oh my LG!  Unbelievably, it continues with this landing in . . . GA; 34/38; 7/10 (7/8); 5; 155.1.

Here’s my landing map, showing that I landed just south of a good ol’ Georgia “round town,” Screven:

Here’s a broader view:

I landed in the Penholoway Ck watershed, on to the Altamaha R (7th hit).

Here’s my GE shot, showing that I landed in an ill-defined agricultural setting:

Fortunately, there was GE Street View coverage on the road (Hortense Road) located 0.1 mi west of my landing.  Here’s the shot towards my landing, showing that I landed in an evergreen (Christmas tree?) farm:

So, I couldn’t find much (read “anything”) of interest about Screven.  I did find out that it was named after General James Screven, a Revolutionary War hero.  Here’s a picture of the good General:

As found at the Quarterman Family Project History website, accredited to the Midway GA Museum:

“Toward the end of 1778, the theatre of war was transferred to the Southern Provinces, and the British planned an invasion of Georgia from East Florida. One British force was sent by sea to Sunbury [about 48 mi NE of my landing, near the coast], and another by land (under Col. Prevost) to rendezvous with the Naval forcey. Colonel Prevost’s force set out in November, 1778, toward Sunbury, destroying and plundering the plantations in its path.

“Colonel John White posted about one hundred continentals with two pieces of light artillery at the Midway Church  and constructed a breastwork just south of it, hoping to hold off Prevost until help arrived from Savannah. When General James Screven arrived with some twenty militiamen, the Americans moved their position 1 1/2 miles south of the Church. During the skirmish which followed, General Screven was wounded and captured; he died while in the hands of the enemy.

Here are some more details from Stacy’s Records (a late 1895 local history), from the same website:

“ . . . Gen. Screven and some of his party crossed the swamp to reconnoitre, but falling into an ambuscade he fell mortally wounded, receiving three wounds, one of which was inflicted after he had fallen . . ..”

What a dastardly deed, shooting the General after he was already down and seriously wounded.  And then, they didn’t finish him off . . .

Obviously, General Screven and his unsuccessful skirmish in SE GA doesn’t make general Revolutionary War history books.  But hey.  The good General (and two of his troops) paid the ultimate price for supporting the revolution . . .

Here’s a plaque commemorating the battle:

I’ll close with this countryside shot taken a few miles southwest of my landing (Panaramio shot by fuscia):

That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2011 A Landing A Day

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Garberville, California

Posted by graywacke on October 18, 2011

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-a-week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  Wow.  This is practically overwhelming.  Five USers in a row and 6/7, with this landing in . . . CA; 90/105; 6/10; 4; 155.7.  Here’s my landing map, showing my proximity to Garberville:

By the way, this was my 1968th landing; noteworthy I guess because I graduated from high school in 1968.  Anyway, here’s a broader view (which shows the Eel R just east of my landing):

Here’s my GE shot, showing an open meadow / pasture surrounded by woods.  Off to the right, is the S Fk of the Eel R, and the (somewhat) famous Highway 101.

Obviously, I landed in the watershed of the S Fk of the Eel R (2nd hit); on to the Eel (5th hit).  This makes the Eel the 145th watershed on my list of watersheds with 5 or more landings.  Here’s a nice shot of the S Br of the Eel R, just north of my landing (a Panaramio shot by “aksnowbunny”):

I landed in northern Mendocino County, just south of Humboldt County.  Here’s what Wiki had to say about Garberville, under the “Economy” section:

There is a Cannabis College in Garberville, and the town has been called “the marijuana heartland of the US” by BBC News.

Cannabis College?  Really?  Well, apparently, yes, really.  Here’s a screen-saver shot of the 707 Cannabis College website (by the way, “707” is the area code):

Here’s some more info on Humboldt County, from Wiki:

Humboldt County is widely known for its cultural attributes associated with the cultivation and proliferation of marijuana. In the years before the growing and use of marijuana for medical reasons became legal – from the early 70s through the 80s – Humboldt County saw a large migration of the Bay Area counter-culture to its region. Many came looking to purchase cheap land, and ended up growing marijuana to pay for the land.

Especially around Garberville and Redway, the rural culture and hippie scene eventually collaborated to create a “hippy-billy” community in which marijuana became the center of the economy.

Kind of sounds like the wild west, eh?  Anyway, enough about the illegal weed . . .

I’ll close with shot of a bridge over the S Br of the Eel, a Panaramio Shot by Richard Campbell (during what must be the dry season):

That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2011 A Landing A Day

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Guys Mills, Pennsylvania

Posted by graywacke on October 13, 2011

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-a-week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  Gettin’ even wilder ‘n crazier now, with my fourth USer in a row (and 5/6) as I landed in an erstwhile OSer but now a proud USer . . . PA; 27/29; 6/10; 156.2.  Here’s my landing map, showing my proximity to Guys Mills:

Here’s a broader view:

Here’s my GE shot, showing that I landed near a north-south road that separates farm fields to the east from some wetlands to the west.  (Unfortunately, there’s no Street View coverage on the road.)

I landed in the Woodcock Ck watershed; on to the French Ck (2nd hit); on to the Allegheny R (7th hit); on to the Ohio R (123rd hit); on to the MM (775th hit).

So, I couldn’t out much about Guys Mills, however, if you check out my landing map, you’ll see the little towns of New Richmond and Lyona.  Well, between those towns is the old farmstead of John Brown.  Not just any old John Brown, but the famous abolitionist who was hung after his unsuccessful 1859 raid on the Federal Depot at Harper’s Ferry WV (to obtain weapons for a planned slave rebellion).

From ExplorePAHistory.com:

In Pre-Civil War Crawford County, Pennsylvania, the farm of the great abolitionist John Brown played a strategic role in the Underground Railroad. Disbursing “depots” in the area, John Brown aided in the passing of an estimated 2,500 slaves. In the town of New Richmond, his farm and tannery was a major stop on the Railroad, marking its place in history from 1825 to 1835. The farm, now a museum, proves to be an educational, exhilarating experience as you learn more about this great man of history and his many heroic efforts. Tour the remnants of the tannery and take a walking path to the cemetery

Here’s a picture of the “remnants of the tannery:”

Here are some excerpts from a fine article I found in HubPages.com, by “solokoyote”,

The old farm house, remnants of the tannery building, and the small cemetery remain on the isolated, rural country road. John Brown, who led the failed raid on federal arsenal at Harper’s Ferry on October 16, 1859, is still remembered, in this small place called New Richmond.

The former John Brown farm, today the John Brown Museum, is located about 12 miles from the county seat at Meadville, Crawford County in northwestern Pennsylvania. The region, when Brown arrived to farm and tan hides, was then a semi-pioneer wilderness, dotted with small, almost frontier settlements in 1826. When John Brown arrived, the nation was at a threshold of history over the question of slavery..

Brown, who was born in Connecticut in 1800, spent more time at the New Richmond farm than at any other location during his lifetime. At the homestead, Brown suffered some deeply personal tragedies. He buried his first wife, Diange Lusk, on the farm not far from the house in 1832 following complications from childbirth. He married her in 1820, and together they had seven children; two children died in New Richmond and are buried in the burial plot.

Later, Brown also met and married, 17 year old Mary Day, who lived in Meadville and worked at the Brown tannery. Brown and Day had 13 children together. Some died in childhood, others remained with Brown and joined his militia in his later years. Day shared a final meal with Brown the day before he was hung in Charles Town on December 2, 1859.

Brown was not a hermit type farmer during his New Richmond days on the 200 acre farm. He was a community activist, a person on the threshold by today’s standards. He was appointed the first postmaster for the region by President John Quincy Adams and held the position for seven years; Brown opened the first school in the area using the second floor of his farmhouse. He was an accomplished surveyor and laid out many of the roads in the area.

Brown, during the time he spent in New Richmond, was actively involved in the anti-slavery movement. Although many of the actions of the Underground Railroad remained secret, because of the violent and tumultuous political climate, Brown appears to have been actively involved in helping to transport slaves from the then-frontier settlement of Meadville to freedom further north into Canada.

Wow.  John fathered 20, count ’em, 20 children.  Much easier for him than for the poor missuses.  Here are a couple of pix of ol’ John; here he is as an intense younger man:

And here he is as an intense older man:

I’ll close with this Panaramio shot of Guys Mills by H.D. Pat:

That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2011 A Landing A Day

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Ellerbe, North Carolina

Posted by graywacke on October 8, 2011

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-a-week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  Getting’ wild ‘n crazy now, with my third USer in a row (and 4/5) as I landed in an erstwhile OSer but now a proud USer . . . NC; 34/35; 5/10; 156.8.  Here’s my landing map, showing my proximity to Ellerbe:

Here’s a broader view:

I landed in the Cartledge Ck watershed, on to the Pee Dee R (8th hit), on to the AO.

Here’s my GE shot, which shows I landed in a little patch of woods near a highway, but also near some peculiarly-cleared areas:

It looks kind of like they’re clearing out the woods to build a highway, eh?  Well, wouldn’t you know.  When I activated Google Earth’s Street View feature, this very peculiar view came up:

The blue lines are roads that were present when the Google Street View camera-carrying cars went through the area taking their Street View pictures.  Obviously, these are brand new roads that were built after the date of the basic Google Earth aerial photo.  I’ve never seen this before . . .

So anyway, here’s a Street View shot of my landing from one of the newly-built highways.  I love the way the push-pin appears to be sunk down in the trees . . .

Anyway, back to Ellerbe.  Maybe the folks that live around there would disagree, but the big story the surrounds Ellerbe is the fact that Andre the Giant had a ranch near the town, and after he died in 1993, his ashes were spread there. 

So, Dan.  Do you know who Andre the Giant is?  From Wiki:

André René Roussimoff (1946 – 1993), best known as André the Giant, was a French professional wrestler.  His size was a result of acromegaly, and led to him being called “The Eighth Wonder of the World“.

André Roussimoff was born in France to parents of Bulgarian and Polish ancestry. As a child, he very early displayed symptoms of his acromegaly, reaching a height of 6’3″ and weight of 240 pounds by age 12. Unable to fit on the school bus, he was driven to school by playwright Samuel Beckett, a friend of his father.

FYI, acromegaly is the syndrome that involves the production of an excess of the growth hormone. 

Eventually reaching a height of 7’ 4” and weighing over 500 pounds, Andre was a huge hit in the wacky, weird world of professional wrestling.  His career peaked in the 70s and 80s.  In 1987, he performed in front of the largest wrestling audience of all time (90,000 fans), at “Wrestlemania” event featuring Andre and Hulk Hogan  at the Pontiac Silver Dome in Detroit.

Here’s a picture that gives you an idea of how big ol’ Andre was:

Oh yea.  That’s him on the left. . . (and the guy on the right ain’t small)

So, this is the first post where I’ve run into Samuel Beckett.  Strange, isn’t it, that Sam drove Andre to school in Paris?  But hey, true confessions:  being a geologist / engineer type of guy, I guess I knew Samuel Beckett was a writer, but I don’t really have a clue what he was all about.  Here’s a quick summary from Wiki:

Samuel Barclay Beckett (1906 – 1989) was an Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, and poet. He wrote both in English and French. His work offers a bleak, tragicomic outlook on human culture, often coupled with black comedy and gallows humour.

Beckett is widely regarded as among the most influential writers of the 20th century. Strongly influenced by James Joyce, he is considered one of the last modernists. As an inspiration to many later writers, he is also sometimes considered one of the first postmodernists.  He is one of the key writers in what Martin Esslin called the “Theatre of the Absurd“.

Ouch.  I’m a more-or-less straight-ahead kind of guy.  There’s probably a good reason I don’t know much about Mr. Beckett.

But hey, they built a beautiful bridge in Dublin that they named after him.  Check this out:

It’s time to turn the page on my Ellerbe chapter, but not until I show you this shot of “butt rock,” located in Blewitt Falls Lake, a dammed-up piece of the Pee Dee River located about 7 miles southwest of my landing:

That’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2011 A Landing A Day

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