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Archive for August, 2013

Orovada and McDermitt, Nevada

Posted by graywacke on August 28, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now moving to an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2047; A Landing A Day blog post number 465.

 Dan –  Continuing my OSer string (now at oh-for-five), with this OSer landing in NV; 81/74; 3/10; 3; 152.1  (highest Score since landing number 2016).  Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My local landing map shows the middle-of-nowhere setting typical of Nevada (it’s about 30 miles from Orovada to McDermitt):

 landing 2

I landed fairly close to Orovada (so named because of its proximity to Oregon, I think).  But McDermitt is a little bigger with a little more to write about.  Although come to think about it, if any town should be named Orovada, it should be McDermitt, since it’s split in half by the state line.

 Here’s my Google Earth (GE) shot, which is looking east:

 ge 1

The larger valley heading towards us is Willow Ck, which continues west and “discharges” into the Quinn River (2nd hit).  I put “discharges” in quotes, because it’s so dry here, it’s probably quite rare to see Willow Creek actually flowing into the Quinn R.

 Here’s another GE shot, still looking east but from farther back.  We’re looking past the Quinn River (and past some irrigated farm fields) to my landing and the Santa Rosa Mountains beyond:

 ge 2

Speaking of the Santa Rosa Mountains, here’s a Wiki shot of the mountain range.  My landing would be in the far distance (far left), in the foothills:

 wiki santa rosa range (landing towards the left)

It turns out that the Quinn River doesn’t make it to the sea.  Poor thing.  It ends up on a playa (aka a dry lake bed) about 85 miles SW of my landing.  Here’s a Wiki watershed map (my landing is some near the bottom of the more northern “Q”):

 Quinnrivermap

Here’s a GE shot showing my landing and the dead end playa:

 ge 3

Here’s a closer view of the Playa (aka the Quinn River Sink):

 ge 4

Incidently, the Quinn River Sink is in the Black Rock Desert, near where the Burning Man Festival is held (check out my Gerlach NV post for more info).

 While looking for some Orovado info, I stumbled upon Sand Dollar Adventures (a WordPress travel blog).  Here’s a brief excerpt:

The recent trip took us across hundreds of miles of straight-as-an-arrow, table-flat highways that disappear into the horizon, along seared brown hills baked in the summer desert sun.

Often the only break in this “endless” scene were the occasional green oasis of some old-time family homestead farmhouse, surrounded by aging cottonwood trees, or the random dilapidated boarded up highway store or service station, long since abandoned, such as this one in Orovada, Nevada, just south of the Oregon border—hence the name.

orovadastore

Click HERE to check out the entire post:

Moving along to McDermitt, from Wiki:

McDermitt straddles the NevadaOregon border.  McDermitt’s economy has historically been based on mining, ranching and farming, although the last mining operation closed in 1990, resulting in a steady decline in population.

Mining in the area has included gold, uranium, silver and, most notably, mercury.  In fact, from 1939 until 1989, this area was the leading producer of mercury in the United States.  Here’s a picture of the mercury mineral kleinite (yellow) on calcite (white), from the Cordero mine near McDermitt:

Kleinite-Calcite-285098 wiki

Back to Wiki:

The state line goes through the White Horse Inn, a historical landmark now being restored, which was a saloon, hotel, and (reportedly) brothel.  When it was open, food could be ordered and paid for in Oregon, avoiding the Nevada state sales tax.

Here’s a GE shot with the White Horse Inn and the State Line marked out.  Well, the line almost goes through the building . . .

ge 5

Here’s a picture of the White Horse Inn, from Trip Advisor:

 trip advisor white horse

The community, originally called Dugout, was named after Fort McDermit, which in turn was named after Lt. Col. Charles McDermit.   It is not known why there is a discrepancy in the spelling.

Here’s ALAD’s take on the extra “t” in McDermitt:  One of the most powerful and persuasive members on the town-naming committee absolutely never cursed, and strongly frowned on the practice.   He thought that “Dermit” was two close to “damn it.”  Adding the extra “t” added a little extra distance between the town and the curse . . .

Dugout / McDermitt joins a list of ALAD communities where I would prefer the original, more colorful town name. My regular readers probably expect that I would now post this so-called list.  OK, OK, so maybe I don’t keep track of absolutely all things landing.

 I found this back-in-the-day shot of McDermitt (from Trip Advisor), which shows the town just before a July 4th horse race, circa 1930):

 trip advisor 1930 4th of july horse race

I’ll close with a couple of Panoramio shots.  First, this of a Shell station in Orovada by Michael Jiroch:

 michael jiroch

And then, this shot of the Santa Rosa Mountains taken from near my landing by Reindl:

reindl

  That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

 

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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Hell and Gregory, Michigan

Posted by graywacke on August 24, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now moving to an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2046; A Landing A Day blog post number 464.

Dan –  Mired in an oh-for-four with this OSer landing in MI; 48/39; 3/10; 3; 151.7.  Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

Since the beginning of 2013, this marks my third MI landing:

 landing 3

I mean, no landings in AL, KS, PA, OH, NY or SC in 2013 (and, of course, no landings in baby states like NJ, DE, RI, MA, VT or NH).  Ne’er the less, three landings in MI.  Oh, well.

 Before presenting my closer-in landing map, let me harken back a mere two landings ago, where “Winner” and “Gregory” SD were my titular towns.  I could have selected some other small towns in the vicinity, but as I said in that post, “I selected Winner (‘cause of the cool name) and Gregory (‘cause that’s me!)” 

 So what happened over here in Michigan?  I could have selected other small towns in the area, but I chose Hell (‘cause of the cool name) and Gregory (‘cause that’s me!):

 landing 2

Here’s my Google Earth (GE) shot, showing that I landed in a mixed residential / woodland / agricultural area:

 ge 1

While perusing GE, I noticed a couple of what I assume are kettle lakes (you know, the lakes formed by buried chunks of glacial ice that melt).   There they are SE of my landing:

ge 2

Anyway, I landed in the watershed of a new river, the West Branch of the Red Cedar River (the 56th stream or river with the word “west”); on to the Red Cedar R (2nd hit); on to the Grand R (9th hit); on to Lake Michigan (32nd hit); on to the St. Lawrence R (92nd hit).

 As you might expect, the town of Gregory has a much more subdued web presence than the town of Hell.  So, I’ll start there, with this, from Wiki:

Gregory began as a station on a branch of the Grand Trunk Railroad, which came through the farm of Halstead Gregory in 1884.  Mr. Gregory built a store near the depot and became the first postmaster in March 1884.

Mr. Gregory obviously claimed naming rights . . .

Moving right along to Hell.  This, from Wiki, about the name:

There are two stories relating to the origin of Hell’s name. The first is that a pair of German travelers stepped out of a stagecoach one sunny afternoon in the 1830s, and one said to the other, “So schön hell!” (translated as, “So beautifully bright!”) Their comments were overheard by some locals and the name stuck.

The second story:   Soon after Michigan gained statehood, George Reeves (one of the town’s founding fathers) was asked what he thought the town he helped settle should be called and replied, “I don’t care, you can name it Hell for all I care.” The name became official on October 13, 1841.

I’ll take story number two.  Regardless of the origin, it’s amazing that back in the 1840’s, the name “Hell” would even be considered . . .

 In more recent times, Hell has attempted to cash in on its unusual name – and appears to have succeeded, at least to some extent.  The town’s unofficial website is GoToHellMI.com; here’s their logo:

 greetings hell

The website also contains a list of things to do in Hell:

 from from gotohellmi

For a full guided tour of Hell, you can check out the Travel Channel feature (on You Tube).  Click HERE.

Of course, there are road signs:

 ilovetowastemy time

There are several pictures of this very road sign on Google Images.  The one I happened to view was from the website “I Like To Waste My Time Dot Com”.  It was part of a feature entitled “18 Most Epic City Names in the World.” 

 Although hardly G-Rated, the article is worth the perusal.  Click HERE to check it out.

 Intrigued by the website, I meandered around a little.  It’s a fun site with lots of quirky interesting items.  In fact, I strongly recommend that my readers check out a particular post.  It features a series of six or seven photos of circular objects against a black background.  You are asked to guess what you’re looking at.  (I know, I know, I shouldn’t have ended that sentence with a preposition.  Oh, well.)

 I think you’ll enjoy it more if I give you some clues:  the objects are not huge (like planets), nor are they micro (something teeny, just greatly magnified).  No, they are ordinary everyday objects that are larger than a ping pong ball and smaller than a beach ball – and, while obviously circular, they are not spheres.

 OK.  Enough clues.  Click HERE, and good luck.

 As is my wont, I perused the Panoramio photos on GE close to my landing.  I’ll present my favorites.  First this, entitled “November Sunrise” by Radio Sputnik:

 november sunrise by radio sputnik

Near Hell are many lakes.  Here’s a shot entitled “Sunset on Silver Lake” by Juan234:

 sunset on silver lake by juan234

UnagiUnagi is a prolific Panaoramio photographer in the greater Hell region.  I’ll close with his artsy shot entitled “A Curve on Patterson Lake Road:”

 a curve on patterson lake road

That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

  

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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Grand Canyon, Arizona

Posted by graywacke on August 21, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now moving to an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2045; A Landing A Day blog post number 463.

Dan –  After 3 USers in a row (and a serious flirt with a Score of 150), I now have 3 OSers in a row, thanks to this landing in . . . AZ; 83/76; 4/10; 2; 151.3.

 Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

A closer-in view shows that I landed right next to the Colorado R (not surprising, given this post’s title):

 landing 2

OK, so I landed right in the Granddaddy of Canyons:

 landing 3

I landed in the watershed of Lava Creek (within the Canyon).  Not surprisingly, Lava Creek flows into the Colorado R (164th hit).

I’m sure you can’t wait to take a Google Earth look at my landing spot.  Well, here ‘tis (looking west, or downstream).  The watershed of Lava Creek is apparent:

 ge 1

Here’s another GE shot, looking south (right to left relative to the above photo): 

 ge 2

You have to look closely to see my landing pin; also, you can see the valley of the Little Colorado River across the way.

 For those of you who follow my blog, you might think that I would see this location as landing heaven.  I mean, really, I’m a geologist, and what could be better than a landing in the Grand Canyon?

 Well, ironically, I’m struggling.  What should I write about??  There’s just too much material! 

 OK, so I’ve decided to go big picture.  The Grand Canyon was carved by the Colorado River, cutting through rocks that make up the Colorado Plateau.  So, what exactly is the Colorado Plateau?  Right out of the gate, it’s a huge piece of real estate (about 130,000 square miles).  From Wiki:

 Colorado_Plateaus_map wiki

It’s also a thick sequence of mostly sedimentary rocks (limestones, shales & sandstones).  More than a mile thickness of these plateau rocks are exposed in the Grand Canyon. 

Two things make it a plateau:  1.)  the rock layers lie flat (just like they were when they were laid down), and 2.) the rock layers have been uplifted, making it a regionally-elevated plateau. 

 You can imagine the Colorado River being uplifted along with the plateau; thus providing the impetus for all of the downcutting & erosion.  Note that the semi-arid climate keeps regional erosion to a minimum and helps make the Grand Canyon the dramatic place it is today.  Essentially all of the erosion going on is caused by the river itself.  If it rained all the time like back east, the entire region would be eroding, little streams would be everywhere, and the river would be in a broader, more subdued valley.

 A major mystery has been kicked around forever in geologic circles:  How did the Colorado Plateau get uplifted, and why aren’t the rocks deformed like they are in the Rocky Mountains?  After all, mountain building (and regional uplift) generally involves massive plate tectonic collisions, causing the rocks to be tilted and faulted.  But that’s not the case here.  The rocks are flat lying, just like they were when they were laid down at or near sea level eons ago.

 How in heck does one lift 130,000 square miles of rock straight up more than a mile without bending or breaking anything?

  . . . After a few minutes of internet research . . .

 I found a May 2011 article posted in Philosophy of Science.  I hope that the author doesn’t mind that I did a little editing for (I hope) greater clarity.  Here’s the edited piece:

Colorado Plateau Uplift: Solved?

In the journal Nature, a team of geologists from four universities has proposed a new model for how the Colorado Plateau rose up over a mile from its surroundings.

The Colorado Plateau, covering a 300-mile-wide area in Arizona, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico, is well known for its dramatic landscapes, including the Grand Canyon.  Its origin, however, has been mysterious.

The authors wrote in their abstract, “The origin of these high elevations is unclear because unlike the surrounding provinces, which have undergone significant compressional deformation followed by extensional deformation, the Colorado plateau is largely internally undeformed.”

It’s as if this 130,000-square-mile province floated up more than a mile without cracking.  Anyone visiting Grand Canyon has probably been struck by the fact that the strata are flat as pancakes for hundreds of miles.  Here’s the gist of the Journal article:

Based on seismic data, the authors propose a “mantle drip” mechanism by which parts of the lower crust have dropped into the mantle, replaced by less dense upwelling magma.  This less dense magma “floats,” and provides lift to the overlying Colorado Plateau rocks.  This is like an inner tube (the less dense magma) under a table (the Colorado Plateau) in a swimming pool (the more dense lower crust).  The inner tube will actually make the table float higher in the pool.

It’s a little vague, but I more-or-less get it.  Some really deep rocks (like a hundred miles down) are hotter and less dense.  They make their way up through the mantle, melting overlying rock as they go.  When this huge body of molten rock reaches the crust (which is higher density), hunks of the crust break off and sink, allowing the less dense rocks to rise up and act like an inner tube amongst the more dense crustal rocks. . . I think.  But still, it’s hard to imagine this obscure mechanism lifting the entire plateau a mile . . . 

I’m going move right along to a 1956 tragedy that (of course) occurred near my landing.  I read an excellent account of the tragedy on the doney.net website . . .

On the morning of June 30, 1956, two airplanes left the Los Angeles airport.  One (a TWA Super Constellation) was bound for Kansas City.  The other (a United DC-7) was bound for Chicago.  Here’s a map of the flight paths as shown on Mr. Doney’s website (his caption as well):

TWA Flight 2, a Lockheed Super Constellation 1049A, and United Air Lines Flight 718, a Douglas DC-7, collided at 21,000 feet above the eastern edge of the Grand Canyon.  All 70 person on the TWA flight and 58 on the United flight were killed.

TWA Flight 2, a Lockheed Super Constellation 1049A, and United Air Lines Flight 718, a Douglas DC-7, collided at 21,000 feet above the eastern edge of the Grand Canyon. All 70 person on the TWA flight and 58 on the United flight were killed.

 

As you can see (and no doubt suspected by my use of the word “tragedy”),  these two planes collided in mid-air right over the Grand Canyon. 

 Also from Mr. Doney’s website (with his caption):

 

Temple Butte and Chuar Butte, the final resting places for the TWA Constellation and the United DC-7, can be seen in the far distance from the Watchtower at Desert View, the easternmost viewpoint on the South Rim.

Temple Butte and Chuar Butte, the final resting places for the TWA Constellation and the United DC-7, can be seen in the far distance from the Watchtower at Desert View, the easternmost viewpoint on the South Rim.

As you can see, one plane came down on Temple Butte, and one on Chuar Butte.  Here’s a GE shot, showing the crash locations relative to my landing:

 

Green Spot:  Temple Butte Orange Spot:  Chuar Butte

Green Spot: Temple Butte
Red Spot: Chuar Butte

Mr. Doney’s article is excellent.  He gives a detailed account of the events leading up to the collision.  It’s at:

http://www.doney.net/aroundaz/grandcanyoncrash.htm

 Or, you can click HERE.

 Time to wrap up.  Of course, there are a million beautiful photos of the Grand Canyon.  So, I figured I’d pluck the two that are the closest to my landing (and relate to this post).  Here’s one (by Donald Mc), taken from near my landing, showing Temple Butte (right foreground) and Chuar Butte (center):

 pano DonaldMc

I’ll close with this river-level shot of Temple Butte.  This was taken from where Lava Creek (my local watershed stream) discharges into the Colorado:

 pano david herberg

  

That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

 

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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Winner and Gregory, South Dakota

Posted by graywacke on August 18, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now moving to an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2044; A Landing A Day blog post number 462.

 Dan –  I was still just one USer away from 150 (for the second landing in a row), and (for the second landing in a row), I landed in an OSer . . . SD; 56/51; 4/10; 1; 150.9.

 Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My closer-in landing map shows my proximity to some small towns, most notably Winner (‘cause of the cool name); and Gregory (‘cause that’s me!):

 landing 2

My Google Earth (GE) shot shows an ill-defined rural/agricultural setting (pastureland?):

 ge 1

The landscape is incredibly flat, and it took some work with the GE elevation tool to figure out which way was downhill (and then figure out my drainage basin).  It turns out that my landing drainage heads east, and ends up in Ponca Creek, which flows directly to the Missouri R (375th hit).

 I couldn’t find much about Gregory, except that the town (and Gregory County) were named after John Shaw Gregory, who was born in Philadelphia and raised in Connecticut.  He settled in SD in the 1850s.  He died in 1881 in Deadwood SD.   From FindAGrave.com, here’s a picture of his incredibly well-preserved gravestone:

 gregory grave

From the same website:

 Throughout his life, John Shaw Gregory was always regarded as a well-educated gentleman. He seemed dedicated to public service and always tempted to private enterprise. The Black Hills Daily Times concluded his obituary with the following: “Major Gregory was a thorough gentleman, but lacked the faculty of making the world contribute to his needs”.

 What a strange obituary quote.  One wonders how he could be a “thorough gentleman,” but still come up short.  I can only assume that he was clueless about making friends and influencing people . . .

Just for the heck of it, here’s a back-in-the-day shot of Gregory:

Old_Main st. gregory 

Moving over to Winner.  From ScenicSD.com:

winner-welcomesign scenic sd

From the town’s website:

Winner was part of the famous Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and later part of the Dakota Territory, which was established by an act of Congress and a proclamation by President Abraham Lincoln in 1861.  Winner was so named because it was the “winner” in the struggle to establish a town along the railroad right-of-way when the Chicago North Western began moving west from Dallas, SD in 1909.

At first Lamro (then the county seat of Tripp County), appeared to have the best chance to lure the railroad.  However, the railroad survey missed Lamro by two miles and immediately a new town originated and was given the name Winner.  Now, Lamro exists as a township, but not a town; Winner became the new the county seat.

More about Winner, from Wiki:

Winner is also jokingly referred to the location of Nerdfighteria, the community for nerds, as created by the followers of John and Hank Green. Winner is halfway between where John and Hank live today.

 FYI, Hank Green lives in Missoula MT and John Green lives in Indianapolis IN.  I checked using GE, and, in fact, Winner is more or less halfway between the two cities.

 Before getting in a little deeper with Hank & John, here’s another interesting tidbit from Wiki, about a winner from Winner:

The May 27, 2009 Powerball jackpot was won by Neal Wanless, who bought his ticket in Winner, South Dakota.  He chose the cash option, and l received approximately $88.5 million after taxes.

So, back to Nerdfighteria.  The Urban Diction has this definition of Nerdfighteria:

The Utopian island nation planned by followers of the Vlogbrothers (John and Hank Green)  in which all Nerdfighters live, a nation free of worldsuck.

Here’s what Wiki has to say about Vlogbrothers:

VlogBrothers is a video blog style channel on YouTube. The Internet-based show is created and hosted by brothers, John Green and Hank Green.

The Greens state that their vlog has no steadfast format: “Really, it’s not about anything in particular. Whether we’re talking about our lives, making each other laugh, or trying to get something more important across, people seem to enjoy it.”  The followers of VlogBrothers are known individually as Nerdfighters, and as a collective as Nerdfighteria.

The channel passed one million subscribers on March 5, 2013.

 Here’s one of their logos:

images

DFTBA = Don’t Forget To Be Awesome.

 Another logo:

images (1)

 

The phrase is Latin for (you guessed it) Don’t Forget To be Awesome.

And just in case you’re inclined to forget:

tumblr_lk4n7hVuSa1qbztsvo1_500

 

Phew.  I’ll move right along to some excerpts from John Green’s blog (a note to his brother Hank, posted on Nerdfighteria.info) where Winner is discussed:

Good morning, Hank, it’s Monday, August 20th and somebody needs a haircut. Hint: it’s me.

Hank, I have a very interesting piece of news. Our secret brother Tom used a machine that involves some magic and a lawnmower in order to calculate the midpoint between you in Missoula and me in Indianapolis, and it turns out that the midpoint between us is a town called Winner, South Dakota. Winner, South Dakota, Hank! As in the opposite of Loser, South Dakota!

Anyway Hank, I got to thinking that you and me and the Nerdfighters could potentially pool our resources and purchase the town of Winner, South Dakota and then build a kind of nerdfighting commune there. Hank, I only know two things about the hypothetical Nerdfighter Commune: number one, all the buildings would be made out of sustainable materials, and number two, everyone would sleep in racecar beds.

So I went online to Wikipedia to see if Winner, South Dakota is small enough for us to potentially consider purchasing. Hank, according to Wikipedia, Winner, South Dakota has a population of just over 3,000 people. It’s located in south central South Dakota, which is exactly like south central Los Angeles, except different in every possible way. Also according to Wikipedia, Winner, South Dakota has a fascinating history. Hank, I’m going to read this to you, and I swear I’m not making it up!

“No one knows the exact date that Winner became Winner. Some claim to know, but they are liars. The territory where Winner now resides was first discovered by white people in 1726, when French fur trader and magician extraordinaire Jean-Pierre Sebastien a la King crossed the Missouri River on his infamous search for the elusive, non-existent giant red-footed prairie beaver of the Dakotas. Although a terrible fur-trader and magician, Jean-Pierre managed to make a fortune in the canned chicken and biscuit industry before dying of botulism in 1743.”

Oh, Wikipedia. Will you ever tell me true facts?

There you have it – Winner’s claim to fame.  Man, I’ll tell you – there are whole internet worlds out there.  I went over to You Tube to check out Vlogbrothers.  There are innumerable videos posted, most with over 500,000 views.

If you’re attracted to off-beat, off-the-wall absurdist humor (which I am, to a certain extent),  go to Nerdfighteria.org, Nerdfighteria.com, Nerdfighteria.info, or just Google Vlogbrothers and let ‘er rip . . .

 With no segue whatsoever, I need to get back to more ordinary landing fare.  So:  I saw this peculiar bend in an otherwise straight road about 10 miles NW of my landing:

 ge 2 otherwise straight road

It turns out that the road detours around Dog Ear Buttes.  Here’s an oblique GE shot to give you an idea as to why the road ain’t straight:

 ge 3 otherwise straight road oblique

Here’s a Panoramio shot by DHartland of the Buttes:

dog ear buttes by DHartland

 

Search as I might, I could no geologic or name-origin information about the Buttes (or about Dog Ear Lake or about Dog Ear Township).

 I’ll close with a couple of Panoramio shots, by Sam Stukel, taken at his brother Frank’s farm near Gregory:

frank stukel farm by sam stukel near greegory pano

 

pond near gregory by sam stukel  pano

That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

 

 

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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Hungry Horse and Columbia Falls, Montana

Posted by graywacke on August 15, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now moving to an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2043; A Landing A Day blog post number 461.

Dan –  Here we go again.  I’m just one USer away from 150, and where do I land?  In an OSer, of course (and the granddaddy of OSers at that) . . . MT; 118/98; 5/10; 2; 150.5.  But . . . I’m still just one USer away from 149.9 . . .

 Here’s my regional landing map, showing I landed way the heck up in NW MT:

 landing 1

My closer-in map shows that I landed in the boonies, but in the general vicinity of quite a few towns (and also not far from Glacier National Park, the big green splotch):

 landing 2

After spending more time than I should checking out each town (looking for a hook) I ended up featuring Hungry Horse and Columbia Falls, for reasons you’ll soon find out.  I thought about featuring Glacier National Park (maybe using the opportunity to discuss the rapidly-disappearing glaciers), but decided not to.

 Anyway, my Google Earth (GE) shot shows that I landed in the woods:

 ge 1

Based on the presence of roads and the irregular vegetative patchiness that’s apparent, I’d hazard a guess that I landed in an area regularly harvested for timber.  The patchiness is the result of the relatively small areas that have been clear-cut and then reforested.

 Here’s an oblique shot looking east towards the mountains that make up the national park:

ge 2

I landed in the watershed of Martin Ck, which flows to the Stillwater R (only 2nd hit); on to the Flathead R (10th hit); to the Clark Fork (18th hit); to the Pend Oreille (20th hit); to the mighty Columbia (144th hit).

 Less than one mile north of my landing is a waterfall on Martin Creek.  The intrepid Troy Smith has been there in summer and winter, taking photos that he posted on Panoramio.  I’ll start with a winter shot:

 falls in winter

Here’s the summer shot:

falls in summer

Think of it:  raindrops that fall on my landing have the privilege and thrill of going over these falls.

 So, moving along to my titular towns.  All I could come up with in terms of interest is the somewhat funky nature of the name of both towns.  Hungry Horse – you get that there could be a story here.  But Columbia Falls? What’s the big deal?

 Well, it’s not a big deal, but here’s what VisitMT.com has to say about Columbia Falls:

Known variously in its early history as Monaco and Columbia, this town takes its present name from its location on the South Fork of the Flathead River, one of the headwaters of the Columbia River and from its location in the shadow of Columbia Mountain.

 [So far, so good.  And now, we’ll hear about the waterfall on the Flathead River, and then I’ll post a couple of pictures, right?  Wrong. . . ]

However, there are no falls on this portion of the river.

 [What?!?!  This better be good.]

When James Kennedy applied for a post office in 1891, he was advised that adding “Falls” to the town’s name would prevent confusion with Columbus, Montana.

Are you kidding me?  How about all of the tourists who pour into town looking for the waterfalls?  So, some numbskull gave James Kennedy bad advice, and he took it?  He should have at least tried floating just plain “Columbia” with the Post Office!

 I must confess here that a little research shows that no state has both a Columbus and a Columbia.  There’s a Columbus in GA, MS, WI, IN and OH and there’s a Columbia in MD, MO and SC.   I wonder if someone tried, and the P.O. said no . . .

 OK, so maybe Mr. Kennedy could have thrown in something after Columbia, like Columbia City, or Columbia Crest, or Columbia Ferry, or Columbianna. . . something!  Anything but Falls!

 Moving right along to Hungry Horse, here’s the story (also from VisitMT.com, by the way a really good website):

Hungry Horse received its name from two husky freight horses working in the rugged wilderness of the Flathead River’s South Fork area. They wandered away from their sleigh during the severe winter of 1900-01. After struggling for a month in belly-deep snow, they were found so starved and weak that considerable care and feeding were needed to nurse them back to health. The name Hungry Horse stuck and was also given to a mountain, a lake, a creek, a dam and the reservoir behind the dam.

No cute little comments from me this time (other than they should have called it Hungry Horses) . . .

 Here’s a picture of the Hungry Horse Dam, from the Bureau of Land Management:

 10675h

I’ll close with this lovely Panoramio picture of the Hungry Horse Reservoir by Wogo24220:

 wogo24220

  

That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

  

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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Palatka, Florida

Posted by graywacke on August 10, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now moving to an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2042; A Landing A Day blog post number 460.

Dan –  Today’s landing is in a long-time USer and a state that I hadn’t landed in this year . . . FL; 28/44; 5/10 (3/3); 1; 150.1.

Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My closer-in map shows that I landed just outside of Palatka, on the St. John’s River:

 landing 2

As you can see on the map, I landed in the watershed of the Etonia Ck; on to Rice Ck; on to the St. John’s R (4th hit).

 Here’s an intermediate landing map, and you can see that the St. John’s River is quite substantial, as it flows north past Jacksonville, turns east and discharges into the Atlantic:

 landing 4

My Google Earth (GE) shot shows that I landed in a somewhat-vague agricultural setting:

 ge 1

Zooming out, you can see that I landed near a massive lagoon that is apparently part of an industrial site (the main facility is SE of the lagoon):

 ge 2 georgia pacific

Using StreetView in front of the plant, I was able to read a sign that said “Georgia Pacific” on it.  So, there’s a big paper mill here in Palatka.  From the Georgia-Pacific website (beginning with the Palatka Plant logo):

crablogo

       Employees: More than 1,200 full-time employees

       Annual Payroll: More than $88,000,000 (including benefits)

      Purchases, Local Goods and Services:   $13 million/yr  in Putnam County; $3 – $4 million in taxes and charitable organizations.

Product: The mill  produces about 527,000 tons of paper products annually, including bath tissue, paper towels and napkins sold under the Georgia-Pacific brand names of Angel Soft, Quilted Northern, Sparkle and Brawny.

Wood Usage: Approximately 1,482,000 tons of pine per year and more than 382,000 ton of hardwood each year. The wood harvested in Putnam County for the mill is valued at $23 million.

History: Hudson Pulp and Paper founded the mill in November 1947 with a workforce of 279 and only one kraft machine.  Hudson Pulp and Paper was acquired by Georgia-Pacific in 1979.

Being an environmental kind of guy, I thought I’d read the company propaganda about their environmental stewardship:

Georgia-Pacific sets high environmental standards, including a commitment to seek 100 percent compliance with all regulations, permits, and company goals.  To meet our environmental commitments, Georgia-Pacific spends millions of dollars each year on pollution control equipment and other environmental improvements.  In pulp and paper manufacturing, for example, these investments have substantially lowered water usage, decreased air emissions and reduced the use of chemicals. 

 Here’s the rub:  I believe them!!   I’ve done environmental work for many major industries and in my experience, the days of a wink and a nod, of “look the other way,” of “do whatever we can get away with” are long gone.  The corporate culture these days is typically “comply fully with all regulations, no shortcuts.”  I assume Georgia-Pacific is the same …

 Here’s a GE StreetView shot on Route 17 where it crosses Rice Creek.  My landing is about 1.75 miles away.

ge sv ck 1.75 mi

Palatka has quite the robust history.  Of course, I turned to my go-to source, Wiki.  As usual, the history section starts out with Native Americans.

 The area was once the domain of the Timucuan peoples. They fished bass and mullet, and hunted deerturkeysbear and opossum. They also farmed beanscornmelonssquash, and tobacco.  However,infectious disease that came with European contact and war devastated the tribes, and they were extinct by the mid-18th century.

 That’s the same incredibly tragic story that one can read over and over again.  It hits you right between the eyes, makes you catch your breath.  But inevitably, you just move right along…

During the late eighteenth century, remnants of Creek and other tribes made their way to Florida, becoming part of the Seminole Nation. They called the location Pilo-taikita, meaning  “cows’ crossing.”  Here the St. Johns River narrows and begins a shallower, winding course upstream to Lake George and Lake Monroe.

 Now begins the story of one Denys Rolles, an incredibly rich Brit who, in 1767, purchased a mere 78,000 acres along this part of the St. John’s River, with the idea of forming a utopian commercial and humanitarian community.  From Wiki:

I hope he didn't wear this get-up in Florida . . .

I hope he didn’t wear this get-up in Florida!

Rolle recruited potential settlers off the streets of London, including paupers, vagrants, pickpockets and “penitent prostitutes.” Two hundred indentured servants arrived to clear wilderness for agriculture and livestock. Unaccustomed to either hard work or a subtropical climate, however, they scattered.

[Wow.  The guy was an idealist, eh?  But funny thing what the requirement for hard work will do to people . . ]

Rolle next imported slaves from West Africa to tend chickens, hogs, goats and sheep, or produce cotton, indigo, citrus and turpentine for export to England.

[Hmmm.  A slave-based utopian society?  I don’t think so . ..]

He built a mansion and laid out a village, but trouble beleaguered the “ideal society.” In 1770, a disgruntled overseer sold over 1,000 of his employer’s cattle and disappeared with the money. Rolle hired new overseers and bought more slaves, but the plantation failed to prosper.

[Imagine the money he lost . . .]

In 1783, Rolle abandoned the colony and chartered a ship to carry his household belongings, livestock and slaves to a 2,000-acre estate on Great Exuma in the Bahamas.

Nice recovery.  I suspect he found the Bahamas more to his liking.  I found an article by J.S. Fletcher (in Examiner.com) about the “Peace & Plenty Resort” in the Exumas:

Let’s start with that wonderful name:  Peace & Plenty was the name of the ship that brought Lord Denys Rolle to the Exumas in 1783. Keep in mind this dates to the period when British loyalists from Colonial America began arriving in the Bahamas.

“Seaworthy Publications” reports on Rolle’s arrival this way: “Denys Rolle was a Loyalist who lost his land in Florida, and in 1783 was given equal compensation in The Bahamas by the Crown.  He packed all his belongings including his slaves and livestock aboard the good ship Peace And Plenty and sent them to Exuma.

“His overseers had instructions to establish a cotton plantation on a large tract of land on Great Exuma to which he had title. Denys Rolle died in 1797 and was succeeded by his son Lord John Rolle … (who) controlled some 2,300 acres was the largest slaveholder with 376 slaves.

“Rolle and the other Loyalists tried to recreate the life they had lived in the southern colonies by establishing huge cotton plantations, complete with elegant mansions, separate stone kitchens, and slave quarters.”

In that era, slaves often took the name of their owners, so freed slaves are the ancestors to many islanders today. You’ll hear the Rolle name everywhere, as well as the communities Rolletown and Rolleville.

Here’s a GE shot of Rolletown:

 ge rolle town

And one of Rolleville:

ge rolleville

By the way, here’s a little info about Examiner.com (the source of the Exuma article):

Examiner.com launched in April 2008, to provide freelancers across the United States with a platform to share their knowledge and expertise through informative and entertaining content. We have an in-house editorial team that provides guidance and mentorship to the contributors. Our network has grown to over 100,000 contributors, captivating our audience with interesting, entertaining, relevant content on a variety of topics. Examiner.com is a top 100 website, reaching over 37 million unique visitors a month.

And I never heard of it before . . .

 Here’s a shot of the Palatka bridge over the St. John’s, by JFernandezHon:

 j fernandez hon pano

Here’s a view of the river from East Palatka, by Darlene E. Smith:

darlene e smith pano

I’ll close with a sunset shot from the same location (also, of course, by Ms. Smith):

 darlene e smith pano 2

 That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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Tolono, Illinois

Posted by graywacke on August 7, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now moving to an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2041; A Landing A Day blog post number 459.

Dan –  Two USers in a row are getting me back down towards a Score of 150, thanks to this landing in . . . IL; 37/38; 4/10; 7; 150.7.  Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My local landing map, showing that I landed between towns with very unique-sounding names:  Pesotum & Tolono (and not far from Sadorus).

 landing 2

My Google Earth (GE) shot shows that I landed in the middle of a farm field:

 ge 1

The photo was probably taken in the spring, below the corn popped up.  My guess is that the patterns in the field relate to drainage (and maybe the aerial photo was taken after some heavy rains).  The land slopes to the southwest; I’d say that the dark areas are wetter, and the dry areas are drier . . .

 Speaking of drainage, I landed in the watershed of the Twomile Slough, on to the Kaskaskia R (4th hit); on to the MM (803rd hit).  Twomile Slough is my 36th “x-mile” watershed, and first of the 36 to feature 2 miles!

 This, from Wiki, about the origins of the name Kaskaskia:

“Cascasquia” is an alternative, supposedly more French, spelling of “Kaskaskia” that is sometimes encountered.  It was named after a clan of the Illiniwek Indians encountered by the early French Jesuits

 I can’t find anything much about Pesotum (in particular, how it got that funky name).  So, moving right along to Tolono.  This, fromWiki (read this, please!):

 Tolono (pop  3,500):  The town’s name was fabricated by J.B. Calhoun, land commissioner of the Illinois Central Railroad, who wrote about it simply: “I placed the vowel o three times, thus o-o-o, and filling in with the consonants t-l-n.”

 I love it!  That has to be the most random, obscure explanation for naming a town . . . EVER!

 Maybe J.B. coined “Mississippi.”  Here’s what he would have said: “I placed the vowel i four times, thus i-i-i-i.  I filled in consonants m-ss (twice)-pp.”

 I wonder what he named his son or daughter?  Maybe Panama?

 I read a 1/5/09 article from the News-Gazette (serving East-Central Illinois), by Tim Mitchell, about the re-dedication of  a 1932 plaque in Tolono that commemorates a speech given by Lincoln in 1861.  Here’s a picture of the plaque:

 lincoln plaque

It turns out that Lincoln (as attorney and then congressman) was a familiar face in Tolono, as he often changed trains there on his way to visit is stepmother when he lived in Springfield.

 The speech described on the plaque was given on February 11, 1861.  Lincoln wasn’t inaugurated as president until March 4th, so he was still president-elect.  The winter of 1860 – 1861 was known as “Secession Winter,” as seven states declared their secession from the Union and established a new government, “The Confederate States of America,” on February 4th.  

This was an incredibly tumultuous time for Lincoln and the country.  He was headed to Washington from Springfield and decided to give a speech from the back of the train in Tolono.  Quoting from the newspaper article:

Lincoln delivered a 20-minute speech focusing on two issues: slavery and saving the union.

Only a few quotes from Lincoln’s Tolono speech survive today, and they are immortalized on the plaque:

 “I am leaving you on an errand of national importance, attended, as you are aware, with considerable difficulties. Let us believe as some poet has expressed it, ‘Behind the cloud the sun is still shining.’ I bid you an affectionate farewell.”

A Danville newspaper editor named Clint Clay Tilton described the end of Lincoln’s speech.

“A sob went through the listening crowd as Lincoln’s broken voice asked for their prayers,” Tilton wrote. “There they stood, these townsmen of Abraham Lincoln, with bared heads, the raindrops mingling with their tears, as the bell on the funny looking engine clanged its warning of the beginning of the Great Adventure.”

 With no seque, I’m going to move from weighty business of the approaching Civil War, to how to get a good meal in Tolono.  I found a restaurant review from the website “Smile Politely,” Champaigne-Urbana’s On-Line Magazine.  Seth Fein visited the Taco Shack in Tolono, and wrote a review.  Here are some excerpts:

Generally speaking, I tend to shy away from what might be considered “unauthentic” anything . . .  And when it comes to “Mexican” food, I tend to stand behind this philosophy and stand firm. Ever since the “gringos” co-opted the food south of the border and made it their own, it’s ever more challenging to find and locate the real deal outside of major cities with a large Mexican-American population.

So, upon learning about The Taco Shack, south on 45 in the bedroom community of Tolono, Ill., I pretty much wrote it off right away.  A quick Google search brought up the name of the proprietor — Kim Barrow — and I knew right away that the food wouldn’t be authentic; it would be just a version of what I really like about real Mexican nosh.

But before we get to the food, I found something refreshing.  A sign in the window:

Gringos_Makin_Tacos

Despite the creative grammatical errors (which Kim and her staff later joked about and acknowledged as intentional — and I believe them), I was glad to see this. It let me know that they understand. They get it. This isn’t their food, and it never will be, but that shouldn’t stop them from trying to make it as best they can.

Seth goes on to give the place a glowing review (not bad for being so unauthentic).  He particularly liked the salsa (which lived up to its “Darn Good” billing):

Front_of_Taco_Shack_in_Tolono2

 Click HERE to read the entire review (and see pictures of the eats).

 I’ll close with this Panoramio shot taken a few miles NW of my landing by TeachinJo:

 pano teachinJo  a few miles NW

 That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

 

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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Lake City, Colorado

Posted by graywacke on August 4, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now moving to an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2040; A Landing A Day blog post number 458.

Dan –  Breaking an 0/3 with this USer (now PSer) landing in CO; 69/69; 3/10; 6; 151.2.  Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My closer-in landing map shows a definite boonies landing, with Lake City the only civilization anywhere close (and it’s 14 miles away):

 landing 2

My Google Earth (GE) shot is very interesting.  I’m starting out with an oblique view, to give you an idea of the topography:

 ge 1

Wild topography, eh?  A flat table top, with an internally-drained low spot (the gray area).  This whole region is part of the San Juan Mountain volcanic field, so I suspect that this is a remnant volcanic structure of some sort.  I spent some time with Google, but couldn’t find any information about the geology of this interesting feature.

 It sure would be cool if some geologist with local knowledge stumbled on this post and enlightened us all . . .

 Moving right along, you can see that I landed on a steep slope that heads down to a valley.  There’s an unnamed tributary in the valley that flows south to Mineral Ck, that flows north to Cebolla Ck; continuing north to the Gunnison R (5th hit, making the Gunnison the 146th river on my list of rivers with 5 or more hits); on to the Colorado R (163rd hit).

 While I won’t be able to expound on the extremely local landing geology, it turns out that this post will be of geologic interest.  Read on . . .

 So, Lake City is yet another former mining town (pretty common for my western landings), but one that has managed to survive as the mines shut down.  Here’s some history from the town’s website:

Reacting to news of the discovery of ores, prospectors and speculators flooded to the area, and in 1875 the county seat of Hinsdale was moved to the swiftly growing community of Lake City.  The town quickly became a supply hub and smelting center for individual prospectors and mining operations in the region.  The area developed so quickly that in just a few years more than 500 structures had been built.  The mining industry and the population of Lake City and Hinsdale County peaked around 1900. Over the next decades, however, mining activity decreased, as did the number of people claiming Hinsdale as their year-round residence.

While mineral production around Lake City continues, the resources that are proving to be the mainstay of Hinsdale County are its pristine beauty, its diverse recreational opportunities, its down-home hospitality, and a well-preserved history that is highly visible in the Lake City National Historic District.

But of more interest is the reason Lake City is named Lake City.  The town is located just a few miles north of Lake San Cristobal (you can see it on my landing map) which happens to be the second largest natural lake in Colorado.  I would normally show a GE shot of the lake, but some pesky clouds are in the way.  So, alternatively, here’s a Bing Maps shot of the lake:

 lake bing maps

Astute readers (and that includes you, Cheryl) may recall my McHenry IL post, where I waxed geologically about lakes.  What the heck, I’ll repeat here what I said (even though it’s from an Eastern perspective.

Let me digress a moment and talk about lake formation in general.  Geologically speaking (at least in the tectonically-stable eastern half of the country), lakes are unexpected interlopers on the geologic landscape, and they’re temporary, at that.

 You can start with any long-term geologically-formed landscape (un-glaciated), be it long eroded vestiges of former high mountains (like the Appalachians), a plateau (like the Allegheny Plateau of western Pennsylvania), or depositional landscapes, like coastal plains.  All of these landscapes have one thing in common:  they all have valleys and streams, but no lakes!  That’s because, as drainage patterns carve and shape the landscape, they naturally develop a drainage system whereby a drop of water continually runs downhill seeking the ocean (no lakes).

 Lakes only occur when something disrupts the natural drainage pattern, like a huge old glacier gouging out rock and dumping debris willy-nilly all over the landscape.  So, in the south, the only lakes are man-made.  But in the glaciated north, the landscape is strewn with lakes:  Minnesota, the land of 10,000 lakes!  The Great Lakes!  And, of course, the Chain O’Lakes!

 All lakes are temporary, because rivers and streams that flow into the lakes bring in sediment that is deposited in the lakes, slowly but surely filling them up.

 So, something must have happened here near Lake City to disrupt the normal drainage patterns and create a lake.  A glacier that dumped / bulldozed a bunch of rocks and dirt and made a lake?  Not a bad guess (and it is the reason for Colorado’s largest natural lake, Grand Lake), but it’s not what caused Lake San Cristobal.

 No, something very dramatic happened only about 700 years ago at this very spot.  I’m sure the local Native Americans were fascinated when it happened!

 And what was it?  A landslide.  A very large landslide.  Sticking with Bing Maps, here’s an aerial shot of the landslide:

 bing map landslide

The entirety of the landslide (known as the Slumgullion Slide) is outlined.  You can see the headwall to the right up at the ridge; down in the valley, the slide material spread out, dammed up the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River, and formed Lake San Cristobal.  Pretty cool, eh?

 Here’s an oblique GE view of the headwall:

bing map landslide headwall

 

Almost looks like it just happened!  

Here’s some information about the landslide (known as the Slumgullion Slide or the Slumgullion Earthflow) from Lake City town website:

The Slumgullion Earthflow National Natural Landmark is a rare example of an earthflow, a specific type of landslide.  About 700 years ago, an area of Mesa Seco, composed of partially decomposed volcanic rock, slid down the mountain and blocked the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River.  This natural dam formed what is now known as Lake San Cristobal.  The earthflow is about 4 miles long and covers over 1000 acres.

A second earthflow began about 300 years ago and is still active today.  The United States Geologic Survey (USGS) tracks the movement of the slide, which in some places moves as much as 20 feet per year.  It covers some of the original slide, and can be detected by observing the trees growing on it that are tipped at odd angles.

 Where Does the Name “Slumgullion” Come From?

The Slumgullion Slide was likely named by early settlers of Lake City who noted that the yellowy color of the soils resembled Slumgullion Stew.  “Slum” as it was also called, was generally a watery stew made from beef, potatoes, carrots, and onions, or whatever leftovers could be found.  Also, miners of the 1800s referred to the leftover mud in gold sluices as slumgullion.  Whatever the source, you might want to try one of these recipes next time you are making supper at your camp site.

 I read somewhere that engineers and geologists have carefully studied the dam to make sure that it’s stable.  They know that sometimes, landslide-formed dams become unstable with time and can catastrophically fail.  They’re not worried about this dam because the landslide went all the way across the valley so that the “spillway” (where water flows out of the lake) is actually on bedrock, partially up the far valley wall.  The bedrock makes for a solid spillway, with no worries about the stability of the dam.  They also noted that the lake is slowly silting in, but will be a lake for another 2000 or so years, before it fills up with sediment.

 Before I move on, my readers obviously need a recipe for Slumgullion Stew.  I found a somewhat official recipe when I stumbled on the blog “Sedimentary Lifestyle,” written by a geologist.  She has a post about a trip to the Slumgullion Slide, where she included a picture of an interpretive sign posted at an overlook of the landslide:

 from sedimentry lifestyle

The Sedimentary Lifestyle post is about the author actually doing field work on the active portion of the landslide.  Check it out HERE.

  I’ll close with a couple of nearby Panoramio shots.  First this, by RiskyRed, of some Big Horn sheep, only about a half mile from my landing:

 pano riskyred less than a mile

And then this, by RSchlaudt, of Cebollo Creek:

 

pano rschlaudt justnorth

 

 That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

 

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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