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Archive for November, 2014

Nerstrand, Minnesota

Posted by graywacke on November 27, 2014

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a once or twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2135; A Landing A Day blog post number 563.

Dan:  This is ridiculous.  After a great run of USers, I’m backtracking fast, thanks to five OSers in a row, including . . . MN; 76/59; 4/10; 1; 147.7 (up from the record low Score of 145.8).  Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My local landing map shows my proximity to Nerstrand and the nearby Big Woods:

 landing 2

My watershed analysis is pretty straightforward: 

landing 3

Prairie Creek (my 6th Prairie Creek); on to the Cannon River (first hit ever!); on to the MM (838th hit).  Side note:  six of my last nine landings have been in the Mississippi River watershed.

Here’s my trip from outer space to my landing, showing that I landed in a farm field (surprise, surprise):

 

Moving along to Nerstrand, from Wiki:

In 1856, Norwegian immigrant Osmund Osmundson moved to the area and homesteaded the present site of Nerstrand. In 1877, he built a store on what became the right-of-way for railroad tracks on what is now Main Street. In 1885, the Minnesota and North Western Railroad was constructed on the right-of-way [I assume forcing Mr. Osmundson to move or tear down his store].  Osmundson platted the town on the line, naming it after his hometown of Nedstrand in Tysvær, Norway.

The town was the center of a significant Norwegian immigrant community, which included people in the surrounding township and county.

The Nerstrand City Hall building [Wiki picture below] was built in 1907 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 along with the Osmund Osmundson House.

2010-1021-NerstrandCityHall wiki

From LakesNWoods.org, here’s a Main Street shot of Nerstrand:

lakesnwoods.com main street

I can’t help but get the feeling that Nerstrand is very much a Garrison Keeler Prairie Home Companion type of town:  where all the women are strong, all the men are good looking, and all the children are above average (and where there are plenty of Lutherans).  To check, I Googled “Nerstrand MN churches,” and here’s the list (with four Lutheran Churches!):

lutherans

Moving right along . . . I  mentioned the Big Woods earlier.  Here’s what Wiki has to say about the Big Woods State Park (actually rather interesting):

The town of Nerstrand was settled in the 1850s, though unlike most prairie farming communities they were fortunate to have a stand of trees nearby. Following a pattern of their European homeland, the adjacent forest was divided into woodlots, typically of 10 or 20 acres each, which the individual owners managed according to their own needs.

The timbers and planks for most of the area’s barns and houses were cut from old-growth oak present in the area that is now the park. Some lots were cleared for farming or grazing, but many were left as sustainable sources of firewood.

In the 1930s large lumber companies attempted to acquire the land for logging. However, the lots were divided among 169 owners, not all of whom even lived in Minnesota anymore, and buying enough land to log commercially proved to be so complicated that each company gave up.

And voila – we now have a patch of woods, although it’s really quite small:

 GE - Big Woods

It gives me pause.  Way, way, way back in the day, this whole region was woods, woods & more woods . . .

Moving right along – I stumbled on the website for Nerstrand Meats & Catering (NerstrandMeats.com).  They’ve been in business since 1890.  Here’s a back-in-the day shot:

 Nerstrand Meats & Catering

I saw a tab labeled “Meat Bundles.”  Of course, I had to click.  This is what I found:

These are suggested bundles and packs. They can be ordered as they are or you can make up your own order. You can use our product list to make your selection.  All of our smoked meats and specialty foods are from recipes that have been passed down from our 120 years in the business.  We know you’ll like our products as many of our loyal customers have for four generations.

Please allow 8 to 10 days for preparation of your order.

Sausage Bundle

2 – Bologna Rings
2 lbs – Homemade Wieners
2 lbs – Smoked Country Sausage
1 lb – Smoked Cajun Sausage
1 lb – Smoked Cheddarwurst
1 lb – Homemade Thuringer
1 lb – Ham & Bacon Sausage
1 lb Mike beef Stix
1 Stick of Salsa Sausage

Pork Bundle

2½ lbs BBQ Country Style Ribs (Fully cooked and ready to eat!)
5 lbs – Fresh Ham Roast
3 lbs – Smoked Windsor Chops
3 lbs – Seasoned Pork Sausage
4 lbs – Lean Slab Bacon
4 lbs – Fresh Pork Chops
2 lbs – Bratwurst
2 lbs – Smoked Country Sausage
3 lbs – Shredded Pork
For the sake of brevity, I won’t include the contents of the Grill Bundle, the Beef Bundle, the Snack Pack Bundle, or the Variety Bundle.  But if I lived within 50 miles of Nerstrand, I suspect I’d be a loyal customer . . .

With nothing much to write about, I figured I’d check out Nedstrand Norway, the hometown of Osmund Osmundson and the town after which he named Nerstrand.  Wiki explains the change from Nerstrand to Nedstrand:

Nedstrand (2008 population 241) is a village in Rogaland county, Norway.

Nærstrand was established as a municipality in 1838 and was known as Hinderaa. In 1881 the name was changed to Nerstrand, and between 1910 and 1920 it was changed to Nedstrand.

Here’s a regional view showing Nedstrand’s location:

 Google Maps - Nedstrand

Zooming in quite a bit, it looks like a wonderful location with fjords galore:

 Google Maps - Nedstrand 2

Of course, I needed a GE look:

 

And while I was there, I of course checked out Street View coverage.  Here’s a lovely waterfront shot:

 GE SV nedstrand with waterfront

And this one, capturing some boys about town:

 GE SV nedstrand with boys

Heading east of town, here’s a lovely fjordesque shot:

 GE SV nedstrand with east of town

Too bad about the damn telephone pole!

Anyway, back to Minnesota.  Here’s a Panoramio shot by Tensor08 of a local road just west of my landing:

 pano tensor08 - general area shot along a road

I’ll close with this lovely waterfall shot, deep in the Big Woods (Pano by Jon Christianson):

 pano falls jon christianson

That’ll do it.

KS

Greg

 

© 2014 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Jail Rock, Courthouse Rock and Chimney Rock, Nebraska

Posted by graywacke on November 23, 2014

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a once or twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2134; A Landing A Day blog post number 562.

Dan:  After my 6/7 USer run, now it’s four OSers in a row, thanks to this landing in . . . NE; 58/54; 5/10; 10; 147.3.

Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My local landing shows my proximity to the titular rocks:

 landing 2

I mean, really.  I’m a geologist, and it makes me happy to write about rocks.  But before we talk about rocks, we have some usual ALAD business to attend to.  First, here’s my watershed analysis:

 landing 3a

So, I landed in the Middle Fork of Pumpkin Creek, on to Pumpkin Creek, on to the North Platte (28th hit); on to the Platte (61st hit); on to the Missouri (359th hit); on to the MM (837 hits).

Now wait a minute.  I landed in the watershed of Pumpkin Creek my last landing – the Broadus Montana post.  What are the chances of two Pumpkin Creek landings in a row?  A little research reveals that I’ve landed in a Pumpkin Creek watershed only one other time.  And get this – it was way back in landing 33 – in May 1999 (it was my first Arkansas landing!).  Then, no Pumpkin Creeks until landings 2133 & 2134!  Amazing!  What are the odds of getting two Pumpkin Creeks in a row after 2100 landings with no Pumpkin Creeks?

Time for my Google Earth (GE) trip to my landing:

 

Now, on to the rocks.  I’ll start with Jail & Courthouse.  Here’s a GE shot looking south past the rocks towards my landing:

GE of jail & courthouse, with landing

And here’s Wiki photo of the two rocks:

Courthouse_jail_rocks - wiki

The National Park Service has this to say:

Located near present-day Bridgeport, the Courthouse and Jail Rocks are the erosional remnants of an ancient plateau that was bisected by the North Platte River. The rocks rise about 250 feet above nearby Pumpkin Creek. The Courthouse and Jail Rocks were the first monumental rock features that emigrants would encounter heading west, and like Chimney Rock, these rock structures have long been recognized by Oregon Trail, California Trail and Mormon Trail pioneers as prominent landmarks on the transcontinental journey west.

Like Chimney Rock, the Courthouse and Jail Rocks went by a series of names before arriving at their current designations. Because of Courthouse Rock’s grand and imposing appearance, many emigrants described the rock in terms of a large public building, naming it the Castle or the Courthouse.

When viewed at distance from the east, the Courthouse and Jail Rocks appear to merge into a large, single unit, and descriptions sometimes referred to them as a single formation, the Solitary Tower or the Lonely Tower. Once travelers approached Courthouse Rock, however, the second, smaller escarpment, the Jail Rock, became visually distinct. Though travelers applied various titles to both features, by the 1840s, most people used the names Courthouse and Jail.

From NebraskaHistory.org:

Hundreds of overland emigrants mentioned Courthouse Rock in their diaries. One 1845 traveler described the rock as “resembling the ruins of an old castle that rises abruptly from the plain. . . .It is difficult to look upon it and not believe that an artist had something to do with its construction.”

Moving about 12 miles west, we run into Chimney Rock (featured in my Bayard NE post of June 2010).  Here’s a GE shot looking past Chimney Rock towards my landing (but GE doesn’t do Chimney Rock justice):

GE of chimney with landing

Here’s what Wiki has to say:

Chimney Rock is a famous, prominent geological rock formation in western Nebraska, rising nearly 300 feet above the surrounding North Platte River valley.  During the middle 19th century it served as a landmark along the Oregon Trail, the California Trail, and the Mormon Trail, which ran along the north side of the rock.  It is visible for many miles from the east along U.S. Route 26.

The pillar consists primarily of hardened clay interlayered with volcanic ash and sandstone. The harder sandstone layers near the top have protected the pillar since it broke away from the retreating cliff line to the south.

Here’s a shot of Chimney Rock, also showing the rock formation which has “retreated” from the Chimney:

 chimney_rock 1

By the way, Courthouse & Jail rocks were also remnants of a retreating rock formation, it’s just less obvious. 

The National Park Service also has this to say about Chimney Rock:

An impressive curiosity to modern travelers, Chimney Rock was a, “grand and splendid object,” to 19th century emigrants, who had never seen the geological wonders of the American West. On June 27, 1849, Elisha Perkins was humbled and awed by his visit to this remarkable curiosity when he wrote, “we camped opposite to & about 1 mile from Chimney Rock. I had some curiosity to see this . . . no conception can be formed of the magnitude of this grand work of nature until you stand at its base & look up. If a man does not feel like an insect then I don’t know when he should.”

Because Chimney Rock is much thinner, it’s more fragile and more obviously susceptible to erosion.  This can be seen in a series of photos, presented by NebraskaHistory.org:

Frederick Piercy, who drew this view, saw Chimney Rock in 1853.  He portrayed its column as tall and rectangular:

chimney 2

In 1929 (76 years later) Emil Kopac of Oshkosh, Nebraska, captured Chimney Rock from the north side as did Piercy.  The rock appeared more pointed, less like a chimney:

chimeny 3

Here’s a photo, also from the 1920’s:

chimney 4

The very same sodhouse from the above photo had fallen into ruin by 1977.  Note that the spire is shorter:

chimney 5

I’ll close with this Nat Geo shot of Chimney, followed by a Michael Forsberg Photography shot of Jail & Courthouse:

 chimney-rock-nebraska-684788-xl nat geo

 

Courthouse_and_Jail_Rock_Silhouette_MichaelForsberg_384_1024x1024

That’ll do it.

KS

Greg

 

© 2014 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Broadus, Montana

Posted by graywacke on November 19, 2014

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a once or twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2133; A Landing A Day blog post number 561.

Dan:  I have that sinking feeling I always get with my third OSer in a row, especially after a good USer run, thanks to this landing in . . . MT; 122/102; 6/10; 8; 147.0.

Just for the record, before Montana, I twice “landed” in the Atlantic Ocean, twice in the Pacific Ocean and once Mexico.  And, because I keep track of all things landing, I can tell you that this was my 200th landing in Mexico and my 500th landing in the Atlantic Ocean (actually, my 500th & 501st).  And not to hurt the feelings of the Pacific Ocean, I should tell you that this was my 272nd “landing” there as well . . .

I just heard a whimper from Canada, who wants us all to know that I’ve landed 215 times in Canada.  Oh all right!  I’ve also “landed” 188 times in the Gulf of Mexico. . . 

Enough!  Moving right along, here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

My local landing map shows four towns, three of which (Olive, Epsie and Sonnette) are totally without internet information (in spite of their uniformly wonderful names):

landing 2

Obvoiusly, I’m going to feature Broadus, like it or not.  Anyway, here’s my watershed analysis (Part 1):

 landing 3a

This was my 4th hit in the Tongue River watershed.  Here’s my watershed analysis (Part 2):

 landing 3b

This was my 53rd landing in the Yellowstone watershed; on to the Missouri (387th hit); on to the MM (836th hit).

Here’s my Google Earth (GE) landing video:

 

And yes, there’s Street View coverage from the east-west highway (Route 212) that’s about 350 yards south of my landing.  Here’s the shot:

 GE SV landing

Pumpkin Creek is just a few hundred yards east of my landing.  Here’s a GE shot where it crosses under Route 212:

 GE1

My Street View shot looking south (upstream) doesn’t show much in the way of a stream:

 GE SV pumpkin creek downstream

Moving on to Broadus, here’s a video of the town’s website, which advertises itself as the “wavingest town in the west!”

 

 

And Montana Pictures has posted this lovely You Tube video tour of Broadus:

 

For you history buffs, here’s a still shot of the historical placard we got a quick glimpse of in the above video:

 broadus history sign

By the way, I featured Monsieur Verendrye (rather extensively) in my Fort Pierre SD (revisisted) July 28, 2013 post.  If you’re curious about le Monsieur, please visit that post.

This is going to be a lightweight post, so, what-the-heck, why not a couple of tornado videos from Broadus?  First, this from Twister Chasers:

 

 

And this, from GoveyFires:

 

 

Keeping with my lightweight theme, here’s a video of a trucker cruisin’ along Route 212 (the road that runs through Broadus and also past my landing), and pulling into the Broadus Point of Entry (aka weigh station):

 

I’ll close with some Route 212 Panoramio shots near my landing.  Here’s a GE shot that sets the stage:

 GE overview for pano shots

I’ll show you the four Pano shots (taken at the yellow circles), moving east to west along Route 212.  First, the eastern-most shot is entitled “Life is a Highway” by Todd Stahlecker:

 pano life is a highway Todd Stahlecker

Moving west, here’s “Long and Winding Road” by Ipswich Ben:

 pano long and winding road Ipswich Ben - 6

And further west (also by Ben) is “Long and Winding Road (2)”:

 98451696

And then, further west and up in the hills, I’ll close with  “Balsam Flowers Alongside Route 212 in Custer National Forest” by Jerry Blank.”

 pano balsam flowers along Route 212, Custer National Forest by Jerry Blank - 4

That’ll do it.

KS

Greg

 

© 2014 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Roseland, Amite and Fluker, Louisiana

Posted by graywacke on November 15, 2014

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a once or twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2132; A Landing A Day blog post number 560.

Dan:  No big deal, but here’s my second OSer in a row . . . LA; 38/36; 6/10; 7; 146.6.  Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My local landing map shows my proximity to my three titular towns:

 landing 2

My watershed analysis shows that I landed in the watershed of the East Fork of Big Creek; on to Big Creek; on to the Tangipahoa River (1st hit ever!):

 landing 3A

As you can see, the Tangipahoa discharges to Lake Pontchartrain (4th hit):

 landing 3B

Here’s a Google Earth (GE) Street View shot of the Tangipahoa, just west of my landing:

 GE SV tang river

For my GE shot, I’ll do this trip in from outer space:

 

Before getting to my three towns, let’s take a closer look at where the Tangipahoa discharges into the Lake.  I’ll start with this GE shot of Lake Pontchartrain (with the New Orleans metro area on the south shore):

 GE Pontchartrain

See all of the green west of the lake with the smaller lake in the middle?  This is undeveloped wetlands.  In particular, note the green triangle on the northwest shore of the lake (bounded by the lake to the east, a road to the west, the developed land to the north).  The Tangipohoa flows through that triangle.  Here’s a closer view:

 GE Tangipahoa wetlands

And a closer view yet, looking at the river’s mouth:

 GE mouth

See all of the white dots lining both shores of the river?  Let’s take a closer look:

 GE cottages

They’re cottages!  And there are no roads, so the only way to get there is by boat.  It’s a whole community!  And it goes way up river.  Here’s a shot more than two miles upstream from the Lake:

 GE cottages  2+ miles upstream

I spent an inordinate amount of time trying to find something about all of these cottages, houses, or cabins, whatever they are.  No luck (kind of reminds me of the Canvasback Gun Club from the last post), so I have no choice but to move along . . . to Fluker.

Fluker has very little in the way of internet presence.  Wiki just says that it’s an “unicorporated community in Tangipahoa Parish.”  But wait!  It has its own website:  Fluker.org! 

Here’s a little history from the website:

Fluker, Louisiana was founded by Richard Amacker Kent, and named for his father, a Confederate Lieutenant named James Fluker Kent. Fluker was the maiden name of James Fluker Kent’s mother, who was the daughter of Colonel Robert Fluker, a veteran of the Battle of New Orleans. Fluker is north of New Orleans, in the region known locally as the Florida Parishes, due to their having once been part of the Republic of West Florida, an area initially excluded from the Louisiana Purchase.

Not much there, except for an explanation for the unusual name and the bit about West Florida (evidently, the Florida Panhandle once extended all the way out here). 

Moving along to Amite.  Not much there either.  Right out of the gate, I was curious about the pronunciation and spent a fair amount of internet time with no luck.  I became more desperate, and ended up looking at You Tube under “Amite, Louisiana.”  I found this news story, which is pretty interesting – about steel from the World Trade Centers being re-used at a foundry that’s making steel for the U.S. Navy.  If all you care about is how to pronounce Amite, you can just listen to the first little bit:

 

I heard what pretty much sounds like Ah-meet.  Evidently, some folks say Ah-mit.  Take your choice, just don’t make it a three-syllable word (even if it did derive from amitié, the French word for friendship, and pronounced:  ah-MEET-ee-ay.

Time to move on to my favorite segment, this about Roseland.  From Wiki:

Roseland (pop 1,200) is a town in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana. It is the birthplace of Cajun chef and storyteller Justin Wilson.

Justin (pronounced JOOS-tain) was quite the guy.  Here’s his 9/7/2001 New York Times obituary (ouch – just 4 days before 9/11):

Justin Wilson, 87, Humorist And Cajun Cook on Television

Published: September 7, 2001

BATON ROUGE, La., Sept. 6— Justin Wilson, the Cajun humorist and chef whose distinctive accent delighted viewers of his ”Cookin’ Cajun” television show, died on Wednesday in Baton Rouge. He was 87.

Mr. Wilson wrote five cookbooks, released 27 albums of short stories and an album of Christmas songs, and was the host of several cooking programs.

He referred to himself as JOOS-tain and became known for the expression: ”I gha-rawn-tee!” (guarantee).’

Mr. Wilson’s father was Louisiana’s commissioner of agriculture, and his mother, Olivet, was Louisiana French. She taught him to cook.

”She was a great improviser,” Mr. Wilson said. ”She’d cook a dish and we’d go ‘Mama, what’s this here?’ And she’d say: ‘Children, that’s a mus-go. It mus’ go down yo’ t’roat.’ ”

Originally a safety engineer, he was inspired to pursue a career in public speaking when he met Will Rogers in the 1930’s.

”He told me always to tell ’em clean,” Mr. Wilson recalled, ”and always tell your audience something serious, or they’ll think you’re a complete fool.”

I spent a whole lot of time on You Tube, which you may want to do as well.  I love Louisiana and I love Cajun food and Cajun Music – so now I love Justin.  I’ll just post a couple of his videos.  I’ll start with this audio-only clip, which gives a good explanation of what Cajuns are.  If you want to stick through the end of the first joke, it’ll take you about three minutes:

 

I love his Cajun cadence.  To get a look at the man, here’s a video of him teaching us all how to make chicken gumbo:

 

Like I said before, there’s plenty more where that came from, including one entitled “At home with the farting cook.”  You can watch that (or not). 

I’ll close with this Panoramio shot by Melanie Thibodaux (a good Cajun name!) taken a few miles south of my landing:

 pano melanie Thibodaux

That’ll do it.

KS

Greg

 

© 2014 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Fallon, Nevada

Posted by graywacke on November 9, 2014

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a once or twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2131; A Landing A Day blog post number 559.

 Dan:  After four new record low Scores in my last six landings, it’s time for an OSer . . . NV; 84/77; 7/10; 6; 146.2. 

I just happened to notice one of those ALAD oddities:  of my last ten landings, I had two NVs, two INs; two SDs and two NMs.  I have no clue what the odds of such an occurrence are, but I’m sure they’re remote . . .

Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My local landing map shows that I landed in Freeman pond, which (strangely for Nevada) appears to be part of a wetlands complex:

 landing 2

Notice the cluster of streets just northeast of my landing?  Let’s take a little closer look:

 landing 2a closer

Of particular note:  “Splatterass Road.”  Really?  More about that later . . .

Zooming back much further, you can see my titular town of Fallon:

 landing 2b showing fallon

Stillwater is a ghosttown (nothing’s there), although it gives its name to the Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge (more about that later). 

My Google Earth (GE) shot seems to show that I landed in Freeman Pond during a dry spell (given the lack of water at my landing spot):

 GE 1

Of course, I had to zoom out a little so I could get a look at that Splatterass Road area:

 GE 2 with disstance to canvasback

I’ll zoom out further on GE to show you my watershed analysis:

GE 1a drainage

That huge white spot is a playa (dry desert lakebed) that is a regional low spot, and where water from my landing would end up (in the unlikely event of a huge rain storm that would fill up Freeman Pond and make it overflow).

Fallon is quite the substantial place (pop 8,500).  Unfortunately, I couldn’t really find a decent hook, although I was impressed with this cool graphic on the City’s homepage:

 

So, the city’s celebrating its 150th anniversary.  Did you notice the old-time shot of all the guys standing in a row?  Here’s the 1939 shot of the Dry Gulch Saloon:

 dry gulch saloon 1939

I’ll admit that I’m a little disappointed:  the crooked letters, the backwards “S” and the backwards “N” (in both “Saloon” and “Fine Wines”) was their 1939 attempt to look turn-of-the-century.  Nevertheless, cool shot.

It’s time to move on to the Splatterass Road neighborhood.  I’ll start with this close-in StreetAtlas map:

 landing 2c canavasback closeup

Here’s a close-in GE shot:

GE 3 canvasback closeup

It turns out that all of the road names (including Splatterass) are duck-related (except for Swan, of course).  Here’s a shot of a Splatterass (another name for a Ruddy duck) by Paul Higgins (on BirdingIsFun.com):

  Ruddy Duck 02 - Paul Higgins

What a cool looking bird! 

I figured that I had to look at images of other street-name ducks, and found that they’re all very lovely birds.  I’ll start with good ol’ Mallard (from the Graham Owen Gallery):

 graham owen gallery.com mallard

Here’s a Pintail (male & female), from Wiki:

 Northern_Pintails_(Male_&_Female)_wiki

And also from Wiki, a Redhead:

 Redhead_duck_wiki

Here’s a Spoonbill, from Ducks.org (photographer Tom Reichner):

 spoonbill duck ducks.org

Aslo from Ducks.org (photographer Rob Whitney), here’s a Teal:

 teal from ducks.org

My final duck is a Canvasback, from Wiki:

 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I figured that since there’s a Swan Lane, I’d look for a cool swan photo.  Boy, did I find one, from the Animal’s World website (Animalia-life.com):

 animalia-life.com swan

So, I figured this not-so-little community with all of the duck-named streets must have a name.  But, there’s no name on StreetAtlas.  None on Google Maps or Google Earth.  None on Bing Maps.  Nor Mapquest.  Could this fairly-substantial community have no name? 

I noted “Canvasback Gun Club” on my StreetAtlas map (before all of the duck pictures).  And, while checking out Bing Maps, I saw this:

 bing maps canvasback road

They call the only road leading into the community “Canvasback Gun Club Road.”  Could the entire community be the gun club?  Of course, I did a Google search.

Wow.  Pretty much nothing.  There’s no website that provides any information about the place.  All I found was this:

 canvasback gun club website stillwater farms

Pretty mysterious, eh?  On DuckHuntingChat.com, I found this interesting exchange among Asutton13, 1nvduhhtr, Sasgebrush and Old Duck Getter about the club:

Asutton13:  I was watchin the outdoor channel today and heard about the Canvasback Gun Club and didn’t know if yall boys knew what this was about!  I’m not wantin to join – just curious.

1nvduhhtr:  All I have ever been told is it’s a High end club, cost wise! I have been by it many times, it is part of the Stillwater Marsh and fenced off.

Sagebrush:  and no “Rednecks” allowed…………..:(

Old Duck Getter:  I was told one time it takes $20,000 to buy into for wetland and $2500 yearly. Like Sage said it aint for no redneck!

Asutton13:  Them rich city boys get to have all the fun!!  But I’d rather do it on my own than pay 20 grand for a club ….but if I win the lottery, I’m going to buy every piece of wetlands and only poor folks can come hunt….. FOR FREE!!!!!! If you drive a Escalade to the club or have all the PREMIUM equipment, YOUR NOT ALLOWED

Sagebrush:  Well, I have to admit that having a nice warm bed, locker for your gear,boots & shells, a kennel for your dog, hot shower and a large area to have breakfast before going out is pretty nice.  Where they ask you what you want for breakfast, if you want a lunch or are coming in at noon and finally what you want for dinner, is pretty hard to live with ??  :yes:  :yes:  :yes:

Wonder if they still have the duck plucking machine ??

But, you could be right, it might not be worth the money.

Asutton13:  So is it a hunting camp or a hunting resort or ??  Im just curious….i guess it all depends on how deep your pockets are!

Sagebrush:  It’s a duck CLUB!!

1nvduhhtr:  No rednecks?????

Sagebrush:  Just Redheads or Johnny Walker Red!!

1nvduhhtr:  That gives me the Red Ass!!!

There were some more serious comments (including some from actual members of the club, who really like the place).   Anyway, to read the whole piece, click here.

And, by the way, I have concluded that in fact, the whole community is the Canvasback Gun Club.

I’ll close with this lovely shot over a portion of the Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge (from the US Fish & Wildlife Service):

stillwater national wildlife refuge

 That’ll do it.

KS

Greg

 

© 2014 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Kingman and Yeddo, Indiana

Posted by graywacke on November 3, 2014

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a once or twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2130; A Landing A Day blog post number 558.

Dan: Wow.  USers rule.  I’m now 6/7 (and another record low Score), thanks to landing in . . . IN; 23/25; 7/10; 7; 145.8.

Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

My local landing map shows my proximity to my titular towns:

 landing 2

A streams-only map shows that I landed in the Rush Creek watershed; on to Sugar Creek; on to Wabash (24th hit):

 landing 3

As regular readers (or geography nerds) well know, the Wabash discharges into the Ohio (132nd hit); on to the MM (835th hit).

Here’s my Google Earth (GE) shot, showing the expected agricultural setting:

 GE 1

The blue line shows roads with Street View coverage, and the dude on the road shows the location of this Street View shot:

 GE SV

I’ll start with the town with a very unusual name:  Yeddo.  From Wiki:

Yeddo had a post office between 1881 and 1964.  Its name commemorates Yeddo, or Tokyo.

Googling Yeddo (without Indiana) got me to Wiki, which redirects Yeddo to Edo:

Edo (江戸), literally “bay-entrance” or “estuary”), also romanized as Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.  It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a “floating world”.

It looks like it’s time to roll up my sleeves and see if there’s some interesting Yeddo history I can write about.  First, a little nuts and bolts history.  From Wiki:

By 1590, when the shogun leader Tokugawa Ieyasu selected Edo as his military headquarters, the settlement boasted a mere hundred thatch-roofed cottages.

[So, in 1590, we had a hundred thatched-roofed cottages.]

Ieyasu assembled warriors and craftsmen, fortified the Edojuku castle with moats and bridges, and built up the town. By 1603, Ieyasu was the de facto ruler of Japan, and his Edo became a powerful and flourishing city as the effective national capital.  Japan’s imperial seat and official capital remained in Kyoto, but the Emperor was virtually powerless.

[So, somehow, this Shogun Ieyasu totally out-maneuvered the Emperor in Kyoto.]

The outer enclosures of Edo Castle were completed in 1606.and it continues to remain at the core of the city.

Continuous growth ensued, only interrupted by natural disasters, including fires, earthquakes and floods. Fires were so commonplace that they came to be called the “blossoms of Edo”.  In 1657, the Great Fire of Meireki destroyed two-thirds of the city and killed 100,000; and another disastrous fire in 1668 lasted for 45 days.

In spite of the disasters, by 1721, over a million people lived in Edo (Yeddo), making it (by far) the largest city in the world.

Here’s a picture of the most spectacular part of Edo Castle (from Wiki):

Edo_Castle Wiki

How about the whole “Floating World” thing mentioned earlier?  From Wiki:

Ukiyo (浮世 “Floating World”) described the urban lifestyle, especially the pleasure-seeking aspects, of Edo-period Japan (1600–1867). The “Floating World” culture in Edo included the licensed red-light district, which was the site of many brothels, chashitsu tea houses, and kabuki theaters frequented by Japan’s growing middle class.

The term is also an ironic allusion to the homophone “Sorrowful World” (憂世), the earthly realm of death and rebirth from which Buddhists sought release.

OK, so I did a little research on the homophone thing, and “floating world” has two characters:“uki” (floating, cheerful or frivolous) and “yo” (world).

But there’s another character used to write uki, which means sorrow or melancholy. 

From ViewingJapanesePrints.net:

Many writers have linked the two ways of writing ukiyo as two opposites of the same perception of transitory reality, the religious emphasis being on the sorrow and illusory nature of daily life, the secular emphasis on temporary escape and enjoyment.

I’ve done some reading on Buddhism, so I get it (sort of), but enough already!  And now borrowing a clever device from my MLB.com-blogging son Ben, I have no segue from Yeddo to Kingman:

no segueway

I could find nothing in Kingman of particular interest, except for a link to early-1900s Kingman Star newspapers (through NewspaperArchive.com).  I’ll start with this great ad that I’m sure caused a significant uptick in sales for Mr. McAlister:

old newspaper 1

It looks like the second line should read “Let Happiness Now Happen,” but they ran out of space . . .

As a geologist, this article caught my eye:

old newspaper 4

Wow.  Here’s a little background:  one method of underground coal mining is called “room and pillar.”  A coal seam will have a particular thickness (let’s say 10′) and extend horizontally for a great distance.  “Rooms” of coal are mined out of the coal seam, and the pillars are left in place so that the roof won’t cave in.  Evidently, the mining company figured out a way to mine the pillars and let the rooms collapse (hopefully without sacrificing any miners).  But watch out!  The land at the surface begins to sink.  The thicker the seam and the shallower it is underground, the more the land sinks.

Tough luck about the 10-foot deep sinkholes all over your farm.  And no damages can be collected, eh?  Those evil mining companies!

And here’s just a wonderful article about a delightful day in the life of Mrs. Towell:

 old newspaper 5

I love the closing sentence . . .

Check out this wedding announcement.  I’m glad the bride was fully vetted, and will be welcome in her new community:

 old newspaper 6

January 16, 1914 was a banner issue for the Kingman Star.  On the same page were these two dueling ads:

 old newspaper 3

 old newspaper 2

These are priceless!  If you lived halfway between Harveysburg & Kingman and your horse up and died, who would you call?

I’ll close with a couple of GE Panoramio photos.  First this, by PSakas, taken about four miles SW of my landing.

 pano PSakas 4 mi SW

I’ll close with another Pano shot, from about the same location (by GordonWinsAll):

 pano barn gordonwinsall

 

 That’ll do it.

KS

Greg

 

© 2014 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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