A Landing a Day

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Archive for October, 2015

Ipswich, South Dakota

Posted by graywacke on October 30, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2222; A Landing A Day blog post number 650.

Dan:  Before getting into my usual detail, take a look at the landing number:  2222.  And even my blog post number is a good one:  650. I’ll jump the gun a little, and also let you know that I landed in the Missouri R watershed for the 400th time. 

With these good numbers, I surely wouldn’t land out in the middle of the northern Great Plains where the towns are tiny, the land is level and the past is predictable (although all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average), would I?  Oh yes I would, as today I say hello to . . . SD.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local map, showing my proximity to the titular town of Ipswich:

landing 2

Here’s my watershed map:

landing 3a

As you can see, I landed in the watershed of Snake Creek; on to the James River (20th hit, yet another round number).  Zooming out a little, here’s the rest of the story:

landing 3b

As mentioned earlier, we’re on to the Missouri (400th hit); and then, of course, on to the MM (865th hit).

Here’s my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to N-Cen SD:

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=co6eoxfPRr&w=820&v=3

Staying with GE, here’s a map showing Street View coverage:

GE SV landing

 

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

GE SV

 

He then turned south and took a look:

SV looking south

Speaking of the orange dude, he also checked out Snake Creek a couple of miles east of my landing.  It ain’t much, but here’s what he saw:

SV snake ck

This is an empty landscape!  But head down the road next to my landing about seven miles, and you’ll run right into Ipswich (pop 1,000).

All that Wiki had to say is that the town was named after the hometown of one of the founders, Ipswich MA.  And then, it turns out that Ipswich MA was named after Ipswich England.  Here’s a GE shot showing the location of Ipswich, about 60 miles northeast of London:

ipswich map

And here’s a little of what Wiki has to say:

Ipswich is one of England’s oldest towns, if not the oldest. Under the Roman empire, the area around Ipswich formed an important route inland to rural towns and settlements via the rivers Orwell and Gipping.  A large Roman fort, part of the coastal defenses of Britain, stood at the mouth of the Orwell estuary and the largest Roman villa in Suffolk (possibly an administrative complex) stood at Castle Hill (in north-west Ipswich).

Ipswich is the home of “Ancient House” (Wiki photo):

800px-Ipswich_Ancient_House

This house (building?) was built in the 15th century (the 1400s!).  The building is decorated with four “paragets” (a decorative plastering applied to walls).  Each of the paragets represents one of the four known continents.  I’ll start with Africa, represented by a naked man holding a spear:

Ancienthouse_africa

And then Asia, represented by a horse and a mosque-like building (Genghis Khan?):

Ancienthouse_asia

And Europe, represented by a woman with a horse and a castle:

Ancienthouse_europe

And then America, represented by an Indian with a dog at his feet:

Ancienthouse_america

So, domesticated dogs must have been considered an important part of the American scene from the British perspective, back about 500 years ago.  I found this by Linda Cole, discussing a book entitled “Carolina Dogs” by Canid Oddysey:

It’s only been within the last 40 years that one of North America’s native dogs was found living in the wild in South Carolina and Georgia.  According to DNA evidence released last year, the Carolina Dog is a descendant from the first dogs that lived with humans on the North American continent.

Domesticated dogs crossed the Bering Land Bridge into North America with the first humans in several migration waves 10,000 to 14,000 years ago. At least one was with Native American Indian ancestors and one was with Inuit ancestors. Some of these early native dog breeds have survived and are still here.

Well, there you have it!  The Indians have always had dogs (which obviously made an impression on the early European explorers who reported back).

By the way, did you deduce that the paragets were added sometime after the building was built (considering it includes America . . . )?

Here’s a Wiki photo of some great architecture in Ipswich:

800px-Ipswich_St_Nicholas_St

Time to head back to South Dakota.  Ipswich SD has an excellent website.  I found this picture of the Memorial Arch which was built to honor those who fought in WW I:

ipswich_arch_lg

The arch was built across Main Street, but then moved because Main Street was widened.  It was then obliterated by a storm, and rebuilt.  The stones used to reconstruct the arch were collected from all over the world, and stones out of each state within the United States.

Pretty cool for a teeny little South Dakota town.   By the way, see the yellow sign on the monument?  It declares that Ipswich is the home of the Yellowstone Trail.  The Yellowstone Trail is a 1912 automobile highway (U.S. Route 12) that went from Massachusetts to the Puget Sound.  The idea for the highway belonged to J.W. Parmley from Ipswich – and yes, the road went through Ipswich and Yellowstone Park.  Here’s a map:

Yellowstone_Trail_Map

And here’s a great road sign from 1926, wishing the motorists “Good Luck!”

190739

Staying with the Ipswich website, they have a cool water tower:

IMG_3097(2)

And they also have a nifty split rock, which is nicely presented:

split_rock

I’ll close with this GE Panoramio shot by Tatyana Keuseman, about 10 miles east of my landing:

pano Tatyana Keuseman

 

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

Condon, Oregon

Posted by graywacke on October 26, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2221; A Landing A Day blog post number 649.

Dan:  After a landing in Mexico and one in the Pacific Ocean, the Landing God decided that I should end up in . . . OR.  Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map, showing that I landed just outside of Condon. 

landing 2

Zooming back a little, you can see why I’m pretty much stuck with Condon:

landing 2a

Here’s my watershed analysis:

landing 3

You can see that I landed in the watershed of Tenmile Cayon; on to Hay Creek; on to the John Day River (10th Hit) on to the Columbia (155th hit).

It’s time for my spaceflight in to N-Cen Oregon:

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=coQUqlfNWH&w=820&v=3

Wait a second.  We need a second look at my landing:

GE wind turbines 2

I landed in a field of wind turbines!  Let’s zoom in:

GE wind turbines 3

Pretty cool (and an amazingly clear aerial photograph . . .)

Moving on to Condon.  Well, it turns out that Condon is pretty much:

aa-hookless

According to Wiki, Condon was founded in 1883 by a Mr. Potter who platted land around a spring.  Potter goes belly-up (financially), and surrendered the land to the legal firm of Condon & Cornish.  Wiki doesn’t tell us why, but maybe he owed them money.  Anyway, Condon & Cornish started selling lots, and in 1884, the town opened its post office and was named after Harvey Condon. 

That’s all, folks – but this is the first time I recall a town being named for some lawyer who backed into owning a bunch of land . . .

Oh yea.  One more thing.  Wiki also mentioned that Harvey C. Condon, a member of the firm (and after whom the town was named), was a nephew of Oregon geologist Thomas Condon.

Hey.  I’m a geologist, and Harvey’s uncle was a geologist.  What a coincidence.  But Harvey’s uncle has his own Wiki page (and I don’t).  I’ll start with his Wiki picture:

800px-Thomas_condon_of_oregon

What a strange-looking dude. . .

Anyway, here are a few Wiki tidbits about Harvey:

Thomas Condon (1822–1907) was an Irish Congregational minister, geologist, and paleontologist who gained recognition for his work in the U.S. state of Oregon.

As a minister at The Dalles [about 50 miles NW of my landing, up on the Columbia River], he became interested in the fossils he found in the area.  He found fossil seashells on the Crooked River and fossil camels and other animals along the John Day River.  Many of his discoveries were in the present-day John Day Fossil Beds National Monument.

Condon was appointed the first State Geologist for Oregon in 1872. He resigned that post to become first professor of geology at the University of Oregon.

I wonder if he preached about ancient fossils as part of God’s creation?  In some religious circles, even today that’s verboten.   I think that back in the 1800s, he must have been considered a radical.

Speaking of geology, I absolutely must give a plug to one of my most unique and unforgetable geologic posts –  my unusually-titled “Shaniko and the Clarno Unit.  During my GE spaceflight in, you may have noticed three closely-spaced landings.  No?  Well, here they are:

GE shaniko

While my Lonerock and Hardman post is just fine, it doesn’t touch my Shaniko post.  That post is all about the “John Day Fossil Bed National Monument” (note that some of the fossils that Thomas Condon discovered were part of what now is the National Monument).  Anyway, it’s a cool, funky post that I highly recommend.  Enough said.  Type Shaniko into the search box if you want to check it out.

Time for some GE Panoramio shots.  I was lucky to have four great pictures all within a couple of miles from my landing (and I’m going to post all four): 

GE pano shots

I’ll start with this shot of the wind turbine windmills by Devin Simpson:

pano windmills devin simpson

Speaking of windmills, this one (by John Christopher) is a little more old-fashioned:

pano john christopher

Here’s a telephoto shot by Scoand showing far-away Mt. Hood (actually about 70 miles away):

pano scoand

I’ll close with this shot by PGHolbrook:

pano PGholbrook just west

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Beeville (and surrounding small towns), Texas

Posted by graywacke on October 22, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2220; A Landing A Day blog post number 648.

Dan:  After landing in TX what do I do?  I land again in . . . TX!   This is my 56th double (same state twice in a row), and the 8th for TX (not surprisingly, TX ranks first in doubles).  Of additional (minor) interest — of my last ten landings, I have two Texas landings, two Iowa landings, two Michigan landings and two Utah landings.  

Anyway, here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

My watershed analysis is straightforward:

landing 3

As you can see, I landed in the Medio Creek watershed, on to the Mission River (3rd hit); on to the Gulf of Mexico.

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to S Texas (click on the link, and hit the back button after viewing):

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=cojtY5fpbb&w=820&v=3

Here’s my map showing Street View coverage:

GE SV landing map

 

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

GE SV landing

To give you a greater appreciation of the ruralness of the area, I had him turn his head to look east down the road:

GE SV landing looking east

Dutifully, I checked out all of the towns on my local landing map, and unfortunately I must say that this entire area is:

aa-hookless

 

But I must write about something, so I’ll start with Beeville, it being far and away the largest town (pop 13,000) near my landing.  But aside from the mildly interesting fact that it was named after Barnard Bee who was Secretary of State and Secretary of War for the Republic of Texas, which was a sovereign country from 1836 to 1846, there’s nothing of hook-worthy interest. 

Normanna has an interesting name origin (from Texas Escapes):

Norwegian immigrants moved into the area in 1893.  The name Normanna loosely translates as “the place of Norsemen” but closer to the true meaning is “far North.” Seeing that’s where the original settlers were from, the name was appropriate.

Families descended from the original Norwegian settlers still live in the area.

I’ve never heard of Scandinavian settlers in Texas . . .

So (according to Wiki), Tuleta was named by the Mennonite founder of the town after the daughter of the man from whom he bought the land for the town . . .

Nothing at all to say about Pettus . . .

As for Pawnee, according to the Texas State Historical Society:   “It reportedly was named for a board inscribed “Pawnee” and nailed to a tree by travelers; apparently arrowheads found in nearby Sulphur Creek suggested that Pawnee Indians had once used the area.”

So that leaves Mineral.  From Texas Escapes (History in a Pecan Shell):

In 1877, Mineral was simply a tract of land with settlers digging a water well. When they found their well water wasn’t fit to drink, they had it analyzed. It revealed 16 different minerals in the water and the world soon beat a path to what fast became a town. The town was known as Mineral City, and everyone showed up wanting to soak in the waters.

A hotel, stores, churches and a drugstore were soon built and Mineral City became a town. In 1889, they deepened the well and the mineral content dropped dramatically.

[Don’t you just hate it when you deepen a well, and the town loses its major source of income?]

Sometime prior to 1895 the word “City” was dropped from Mineral City’s post office name. The hotel disappeared – probably becoming someone’s private residence.

In 1890 the population was 100 people. They had a fire in 1901 and had barely recovered when there was a flood in 1903.

Phew.  A truly hookless post.  Anyway, it’s time for some GE Panoramio shots.  I’ll start with this one by Bride Hunting Texas entitled “Normanna Through Truss 1897,” which I assume is a railroad bridge where the tracks were removed:

pano bridgehunting texas

I’ll close with this shot by Mac Evans, taken, appropriately enough, in Beeville:

pano mac evans

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Iraan, Ozona and Big Lake, Texas

Posted by graywacke on October 18, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Landing number 2219; A Landing A Day blog post number 647.

Dan:  Since changing my “random” lat/long generator to a truly random lat/long generator, (look back to my Grand Rapids post), I have landed in MI, then IA (both OSers) and now . . . TX (long-time USer).  Maybe after 50 landings or so with my new random landings, I’ll start doing some statistics . . .

Anyway, here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my not-so-local landing map:

landing 2

I needed Google Earth (GE) for my watershed analysis, so I’ll jump right into to my GE spaceflight in to West Texas (click on link, then hit “back” after viewing):

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=cojbY8fA6v&w=820&v=3

Before I worry about my watershed, let’s take a look at a static GE shot of my landing:

GE 1

You can see the grid pattern, with four grid-lines every half mile.  What the heck?  It looks like the brush / scrub has been cleared along surveyed grid lines.  I’ll zoom back a little more:

GE 2

Wow – they cover a large area.  OK, OK, I’ll zoom back some more:

GE 3

Well, we’re in an oil field (no surprise there), but it looks like the grids have nothing to do with oil.  What the . . . ?

Let’s look way closer:

GE 4

 

A little bit south of my landing, I found an E-W road with Street View coverage that intersects several of these N-S grid lines.  Here’s one of the grid lines heading north up the hill:

GE SV gridline

See?  They’re real!  Someone actually cleared miles and miles of gridlines!  I’ve never seen anything like this.  A google search tells me nothing.  I can only assume it had something to do with a long-ago oil-drilling plan, when wells were drilled much closer together . . . .

In fact, I found this GE shot posted by John McFarland in his blog entitled “Oil and Gas Lawyer Blog.”  This is a shot in far west Texas, and you can see that wells were much closer spaced, and on a grid pattern:

Ward-County-Google

Enough about oil and gas already.  Moving on to my watershed analysis.  My streams-only Street Atlas map showed me nothing about local streams.  But using GE, I saw a north-south stream bed that passed under I-10.  I used GE Street View (SV) to take a look at the stream.  Check this out:

GE SV howard draw at I-10

Some wonderful highway sign guy put up the sign that let me know that I landed in the watershed of Howard Draw.  I positioned the orange dude on the bridge, and took a look upstream:

GE SV howard draw at I-10 (2)

Here’s a GE shot showing Howard Draw making its way past Howard Spring, on its way to the Pecos River (16th hit):

GE map howard draw

Here’s a streams-only map showing that the Pecos makes its way to the Rio Grande (44th hit):

landing 3

 

Believe it or not, Howard Springs (which doesn’t even exist any more, as you’ll see) actually has a Wiki page.  Here are some excerpts:

Howard Springs was an important watering hole for Native Americans in the dry country between Devils River and the Pecos River and later was the only reliable water on a 44-mile stretch of the San Antonio-El Paso Road.

Its early appearance was described by Robert A. Eccleston, one of a party of forty-niners traveling with the U. S. Army expedition that established the San Antonio-El Paso Road in 1849. In Eccleston’s diary of that trip he writes about the spring where they camped on August 2–3, 1849:

“The water…where we took it from, it was impregnated with vegetable matters that it was hardly fit to drink.”

“The hills that surrounded this valley are all nearly the same height & uniformly flat, upon the top. This place had formerly been a great Indian rendezvous, as bones of all kinds of beasts were strewn about.”

A favorite living place, native tribes fought bitterly to control these springs, killing many teamsters and settlers in the vicinity as late as 1872.

Later, local ranchers overgrazed the region, killing off the formerly abundant ground cover, thereby increasing the volume of runoff which then washed gravel into the springs and filled them up, and changing the course of the stream bed. Seeps still emerge beneath the surface of a nearby 200-meter-long pond in Howard Draw. Oilfield drilling recently has contaminated this water.

So, we screwed up this spring, didn’t we?

Anyway, this will end up being one of those a-little-bit-of-this-and-a-little-bit-of-that kind of posts.  Based on my local landing map, you can that I had six or seven towns to check out.  Well, as one might expect, most of them were hookless.  But I was fascinated as to just how the town of Iraan got its name.  From TexasExcapes.com (History in Pecan Shell):

The name has nothing to do with the country of Iran. Oil was discovered on the ranch of Ira Yates and a contest was held to name the town that would soon materialize. Ira’s wife was named Ann. A woman (Mary Louise Lewis Hardgrave) combined the two names [although she dropped an “n”] and won a town lot as a prize.  She later sold the lot for $1,000.

Wow.  A thousand bucks for what seems like a so-so name.  No offense, but I would have kept the extra “n” –  Iraann.

The Texas Escapes article included this photo of a sign for a carwash in Iraan:

IraanTexasCarwashSign

All of you Spanish-speakers are laughing already.  For you non Spanish-speakers, Mejor Que Nada means “Better Than Nothing.”  Hey, for 50 cents, what do you expect?

Moving along to Ozona.  From Wiki, about this strange name:

Ozona was known as “Powell Well”, after land surveyor E.M. Powell, when it was founded in 1891. In 1897, it was renamed “Ozona” for the high quantity of its open air, or “ozone”.

Say what?  Since when is ozone a “high quantity of open air?”  Here’s some of what Wiki has to say about ozone:

Ozone, or trioxygen, is an inorganic molecule with the chemical formula O3. It is a pale blue gas with a distinctively pungent smell. Ozone is formed from stable atmospheric oxygen (dioxygen) by the action of ultraviolet light and also atmospheric electrical discharges, and is present in low concentrations throughout the Earth’s atmosphere. In total, ozone makes up only 0.6 ppm of the atmosphere.

But hey!  Ozone stinks!  In fact, according to Dictionary.com, the word “ozone” is derived from the Greek ozon, meaning “to smell.” 

But Wiki goes on to say:

For much of the second half of the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth, ozone was considered a healthy component of the environment by naturalists and health-seekers. Beaumont, California had as its official slogan “Beaumont: Zone of Ozone,” as evidenced on postcards and Chamber of Commerce letterhead.  Also, the town of Ozone, Tennessee was so named because of its excellent air quality.

All right, moving along to Big Lake.  From Wiki:

The city takes its name from a dry lake located less than two miles south of the city. The dry lake holds water temporarily and only after high runoff rain events.  It is used for cattle grazing the remainder of the time.

Here’s a GE shot of the town and lake, showing that Route 137 actually crosses the lake (outlined in blue by yours truly): 

GE big lake

Here’s a wet-weather Panoramio shot taken from the roadway (by doning):

pano doning

Here’s a prettier Pano shot of a small part of the lake by EvansJohnC:

pano evansjohnc

And then there’s this Pano shot by CWoods of a sign along the road:

pano cwoods

You gotta love it!

I’ll close with this lovely Pano shot of the Pecos River (by JDeppa), just below where Howard Draw comes in (in fact, the little embayment in the river bank to the right just might be where the Draw discharges):

pano jdeppa pecos near howard draw

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Spillville, Iowa

Posted by graywacke on October 13, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is, please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Landing number 2218; A Landing A Day blog post number 646.

Dan:  Well, here’s my first post, post my momentus mea culpa post (I worked hard to get three “posts” in one sentence).  For those readers who missed it, just scroll down and you can check it out.  It explains why my usual first paragraph just doesn’t cut it anymore . . .

Anyway, I today’s truly random landing spot is in northeast . . . IA.  Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Here’s my watershed map:

landing 3

As you can see, I landed in the Turkey River watershed (only my 2nd landing here); on to the Mississippi (864th hit).

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to northeast IA (click on the link and then hit the back button after viewing):

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=coj2DIfzFQ&w=820&v=3

Well, I landed just a couple miles from Spillville (plus I love the name), so Spillville it is.  From Wiki:

Originally named Spielville after the founder, Joseph Spielmann, it was misread and became Spillville.

[That’s pretty lame, don’t you think?  But as an environmental clean-up guy, I love the name Spillville.  Sounds like a place that needs my services . . .]

Spillville boasts a strong cultural and musical history. The Czech composer Antonín Dvořák spent the summer of 1893 in Spillville, where he had Dvořák relatives. There he composed two of his most famous chamber works, including the String Quartet in F (“The American”).

Spillville is also the site of the Inwood Ballroom, established in 1920 and the destination of several popular 20th century musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Glenn Miller, Guy Lombardo, and The Byrds.

Many tourists to Spillville also visit the Bily Clocks Museum (see link below), a collection of intricately designed clocks created by two brothers in Spillville.

Wow.  Maybe not the greatest hooks, but hooks nontheless! So what the heck, I’ll start with Dvořák.  Let’s start with pronunciation:   da-VOR-chek  (at least that’s my take on it).

So, here’s just a little bit (a very little bit) about the composer from Britannica.com – along with this Wiki portrait of an angry-looking composer:

Dvorak1

Antonín Dvořák (born 1841, Bohemia, Austrian Empire [now in Czech Republic]—died 1904, Prague), first Bohemian composer to achieve worldwide recognition, noted for turning folk material into the language of 19th-century Romantic music.

Britannica and Wiki go on and on about his music, its impact, etc. etc.  But I’ll admit to never being able to push rock ‘n roll aside and make room in my life for classical music.  But it’s cool that he spent the summer in Spillville, eh?

Anyway, here’s the Cleveland Quartet performing the famous piece that Dvořák composed while in Spillville, the String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96 “American.”  I listened to several on-line versions; the one I selected has the best sound quality (and in my extremely humble opinion) sounded intrinsically better than the others.  I recommend just letting this play as background music while you read the rest of this post.

 

Moving on to the Inwood Ballroom.  Amazing that this teeny Iowa town played host to such famous musicians.  But The Byrds?!?!

Anyway, from the Inwood website, here’s a pic:

inwood ballroom

Now it’s time for Bily Clocks.  Anyway, to learn all about them, check out this short video from VisitIowa.org (I’m not giving you much time to listen to Dvořák, am I?): 

 

So the Bily Clock museum is actually where Antonin Dvořák lived . . . 

Of course, I checked out GE Panoramio shots near my landing.  Oh oh.  Nothing much of interest.  I had to wander about 10 miles to the northeast, into a different watershed, where I found this lovely stream shot by Schauf:

pano schauf

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Grand Rapids, Michigan (and a major mea culpa)

Posted by graywacke on October 9, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Landing number 2217; A Landing A Day blog post number 645.

Dan:  This is going to be a highly unusual post.  As you are well aware, Dan – having been cc:d on the email from my son Jordan (discussed below) – this is going to be a major mea culpa post.  So, dear reader, bear with me while I explain (or you might rather simply skip the mea culpa and scroll down to my regional landing map).  But first, this tidbit for you non-Latin speakers out there.  “Mea Culpa” simply means “my fault.”  Anyway, here goes:

For all 2215 landings, I have had my computer (using Excel) calculate my random latitude and longitude for each landing.  I programmed Excel so that it simply takes the difference in latitude from Canada to Key West, and multiplies it by a random number that is between zero and one.  That gives me a random latitude between the two extremes.  Similarly, it then takes the difference in longitude from Maine to Washington and multiplies that by another random number to generate a random longitude.  In this way, I get a specific random location in the lower 48.

But you know, I’ve always been troubled by the peculiar distribution of oversubscribed (OS) states (i.e., those states where I land more than I should, based on area) and undersubscribed (US) states (those states where I land less than I should, based on area).  And really!  Why is Texas soooo US?  And why is there a block of OSers across the northern states?  Why is there a block of USers stretching from NM across to VA?

My answer has always been:  The Landing God makes it so.  Well, my son Jordan (an avid follower of my landings) has also been troubled by the skewed distribution of OSers and USers, and he didn’t buy my Landing God hypothesis (especially after 2200 landings).  So he actually thought deeply about it, and sent me this email:

Your lat longs are random, which is of course a fair way to do it, but there might be a flaw with it. Latitude is fine, as the distance between parallel lines is always the same. However the distance between lines of longitude varies based on latitude and the lines are not parallel. Take this map for example:

image2

 

Look at your most OS state, Montana and compare it with your most US state, Texas.  The distance between W 100 and W 110 is significantly less near Montana than it is near Texas, meaning that your landings are bound to be more dense up north and less dense down south.

Ouch.  He had more to say, but when I read this, I knew he was on to something big.  The most important statement is the one I highlighted – and it is absolutely true.  I emailed Jordan back:

This is really sinking in.  In a way, I’m devastated!  What do I do now?  Do I attempt to do a mathematical adjustment on the whole OSer / USer calculation?  Do I try to amend the whole random lat/long generation process?  But now, after 2200 landings?  And what about my Score?  There’s no way it’s inevitably heading towards zero . . .

The typical first paragraph of every post is crumbling before my eyes . . .

So I took the map that Jordan sent me, and added OS (for over-subscribed), US (for under-subscribed) and PS (for perfectly subscribed):

image3

As you can see (as I was discussing earlier), Jordan’s general point holds true:  there are more OS states up north and more US states down south.  In particular, look at the block of OSers stretching from Oregon & Washington east to Michigan (and over to NY if you’d like).  The one exception (thanks to the Landing God) is Idaho. 

Down south, it’s a little more of a mixed bag, but look at CA through VA (following the border and coast).  With the exception of AZ, LA and MS, it’s a block of solid USers. 

So, I took a deep breath and went online.  Amazingly, I found a site –  GeoMidPoint.com –  where you can enter a “rectangle” based on latitude and longitude, and it picks out a random location from inside the rectangle!  And, as the website says:

All flat maps distort the size and/or shape of the continents and other features to a certain degree. On a Mercator projection map, for example, Greenland appears to be the same size as South America although it is actually eight times smaller.

The Random Point Generator solves this distortion problem because the calculation it uses is based on the spherical earth, and therefore when the calculator throws a virtual dart, all points on the earth’s surface have an equal probability of being chosen.

So, beginning with this landing, I’m using the Geo Midpoint program to get my random locations.  I guess I’ll simply carry on, but maybe I’ll de-emphasize the whole USer / OSer thing a little . . .

So, using my new technique, I landed in a long time OSer (no surprise, eh?) . . . MI.  I’m going to forgo the string of numbers I always put here, because . . . well . . . they just don’t mean the same thing anymore.   (Boy – I guess I did de-emphasize the whole USer / OSer thing!)  Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my very local landing map, showing quite the urban setting:

landing 2a

Here’s an expanded local map, showing my proximity to Grand Rapids:

landing 2b

You can see from the above maps that I’ve already started my watershed analysis, as I landed right next to Buck Creek, which flows into the Grand River (10th hit).  As you see here, the Grand makes its way to Lake Michigan (36th hit):

landing 3

And, of course, we’re on to the St. Lawrence (102nd hit).

Time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to the great Grand Rapids area:

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=cojl2Cfa4r&w=820&v=3

It looks like I landed in a park or, more likely, a cemetery.  Let me look a little closer:

GE 2

Yup.  No doubt about it.  I landed in a cemetery, Grandville Cemetery to be more precise.  I hope I ddin’t disturb anyone when the big yellow push-pin came down.

Here’s a GE shot showing Street View coverage:

GE SV landing map

And here’s what a visitor to the cemetery sees just as he’s turning in (OK, minus the big yellow arrow):

GE SV landing

 

I didn’t bother with a Street View shot of Buck Creek, but I have a nice GE Panaramio shot near my landing of a bridge over the creek at the end of the post.

Besides landing in the Grandville Cemetery, I have nothing else to say about Grandville.  After all, it’s just a suburb of Grand Rapids. . .

So first, just a little about the name “Grand Rapids.”  Obviously, the “Grand” isn’t about the magnitude of the rapids, it’s simply the name of the river.  And the “Rapids” part has been eliminated, primarily by the 6th Street Dam in downtown Grand Rapids. 

Here’s a picture of some fishermen at the dam (courtesy of Betts Guide Service):

bettsguideservice

The dam gets a lot of press for being dangerous to fisherman and kayakers.  Want to see why it’s dangerous to kayak over the dam?  Check out this You Tube video (it’s a shorty):

 

He really had to struggle to get away from the dam, eh?

But anyway, as far as I’m concerned, the real hook in Grand Rapids is the fact that this is the hometown of one Gerald Ford.  President Ford is kind of an “afterthought” president (sometimes lumped with Jimmy Carter as such), but he was a fascinating man who presided over and was involved with some remarkable history.  Taking excerpts from Wiki:

800px-Gerald_Ford

. . . Gerald Ford was born Leslie Lynch King Jr., on July 14, 1913, in Omaha, Nebraska. His mother was Dorothy Gardner, and his father was Leslie King. Dorothy separated from King just sixteen days after her son’s birth . . .

. . . Dorothy moved to the home of her parents in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Dorothy and King divorced in December 1913; she gained full custody of her son . . .

. . . in 1916, Dorothy married Gerald Rudolff Ford, a salesman in a family-owned paint and varnish company. They then called her son Gerald Rudolff Ford Jr. The future president was never formally adopted, however, and he did not legally change his name until December 3, 1935 (at age 22). . .

. . . Ford attended Grand Rapids South High School and was a star athlete and captain of his football team.  He attracted the attention of college recruiters, and attended the University of Michigan . . .

. . . Ford played center, linebacker and long snapper for the school’s football team and helped the Wolverines to undefeated seasons and national titles in 1932 and 1933 . . .

. . . during Ford’s senior year a controversy developed when the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets refused to play a scheduled game if a black player named Willis Ward took the field. Even after protests from students, players and alumni, university officials opted to keep Ward out of the game. Ford was Ward’s best friend on the team and they roomed together while on road trips. Ford threatened to quit the team in response to the university’s decision, but eventually agreed to play against Georgia Tech when Ward personally asked him to play. . .

. . . Ford was in the Navy during WWII, and served on the aircraft carrier Monterey.  He saw extended combat in the South Pacific . . .

. . . the Monterey was damaged by a fire during a Pacific typhoon in 1944, which was started by several of the ship’s aircraft tearing loose from their cables and colliding on the hangar deck. During the storm, Ford narrowly avoided becoming a casualty himself. As he was going to his battle station on the bridge of the ship, the ship rolled twenty-five degrees, which caused Ford to lose his footing and slide toward the edge of the deck. The two-inch steel ridge around the edge of the carrier slowed him enough so he could roll, and he twisted into the catwalk below the deck. As he later stated, “I was lucky; I could have easily gone overboard.”

. . . Ford was a member of the House of Representatives for 25 years, culminating in his being named Vice President under Richard Nixon in 1973, after the elected Vice President, Spiro Agnew, resigned in disgrace for accepting $29,500 in bribes while Governor of Maryland . . .

. . . following Ford’s appointment, the Watergate investigation continued until Chief of Staff Alexander Haig contacted Ford on August 1, 1974, and told him that “smoking gun” evidence had been found. The evidence left little doubt that President Nixon had been a part of the Watergate cover-up. . .

. . . at the time, Ford and his wife, Betty, were living in suburban Virginia, waiting for their expected move into the newly designated vice president’s residence in Washington, D.C. However, Al Haig warned Ford that he might well be president soon.  Ford said to his wife:   “Betty, I don’t think we’re ever going to live in the vice president’s house” . . .

. . . when Nixon resigned on August 9, 1974, Ford assumed the presidency, making him the only person to assume the presidency without having been previously voted into either the presidential or vice presidential office . . .

. . . Immediately after taking the oath of office, he said to the nation:  “I am acutely aware that you have not elected me as your president by your ballots, and so I ask you to confirm me as your president with your prayers” . . .

. . . only a month later, Ford gave Nixon a full and unconditional pardon for any crimes he might have committed against the United States while President. In a televised broadcast to the nation, Ford explained that he felt the pardon was in the best interests of the country, and that the Nixon family’s situation “is a tragedy in which we all have played a part. It could go on and on and on, or someone must write the end to it. I have concluded that only I can do that, and if I can, I must” . . .

. . . the Nixon pardon was highly controversial, and many historians believe the controversy was one of the major reasons Ford lost the election in 1976 . . .

. . . in 2001, Ford was awarded the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for his pardon of Nixon. . .

. . . shortly after he announced the Nixon pardon, Ford introduced an amnesty program for Vietnam War draft dodgers who had fled to countries such as Canada as well as for military deserters. The conditions of the amnesty required that those involved reaffirm their allegiance to the United States and serve two years working in a public service job . . .

. . . one of Ford’s greatest challenges was dealing with the continued Vietnam War.  In December 1974, just a few months after Ford took office, North Vietnamese forces invaded the province of Phuoc Long, not far north of Saigon.  The North Vietnamese army advanced south towards Saigon . . .

. . . in April, Saigon fell.  Thousands of U.S. citizens and South Vietnamese nationals were evacuated in a disorganized helicopter airlift retreat from Saigon just preceding the fall of Saigon. . .

Here’s a famous “fall of Saigon” photo:

800px-Saigon-hubert-van-es

Back to Wiki:

. . . Ford faced two assassination attempts during his presidency, occurring within three weeks of each other and in the same state; while in Sacramento, California, on September 5, 1975, Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, a follower of Charles Manson, pointed a Colt .45-caliber handgun at Ford.  As Fromme pulled the trigger, Larry Buendorf, a Secret Service agent, grabbed the gun and Fromme was taken into custody . . .

. . .as Ford left the St. Francis Hotel in downtown San Francisco, Sara Jane Moore, standing in a crowd of onlookers across the street, pointed her .38-caliber revolver at him, and fired a single round that missed.  Just before she fired a second round, retired Marine Oliver Sipple grabbed at the gun and deflected her shot; the bullet struck a wall about six inches above and to the right of Ford’s head . . .

. . . Ford reluctantly agreed to run for office in 1976.  In addition to the pardon dispute and lingering anti-Republican sentiment, Ford had to counter a plethora of negative media imagery. Chevy Chase often did pratfalls on Saturday Night Live, imitating Ford, who had been seen stumbling on two occasions during his term. As Chase commented, “He even mentioned in his own autobiography it had an effect over a period of time that affected the election to some degree.”  In the end, Carter won the election although it was close . . .

. . . Ford died on December 26, 2006, at the age of 93 years and 165 days, making Ford the longest-lived U.S. President . . .

All in all, I’d say that Gerald Ford has quite the legacy for an “afterthought” president.

I’ll close with a couple of GE Panoramio shots in a park along Buck Creek just southwest of my landing.  Both are by Fotero78 (although both photos say Chris Vanderlip).  First one of a footbridge over the creek:

pano fotero78

And then a pretty scene in the park:

pano fotero78 2

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Garrison, Utah

Posted by graywacke on October 5, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Landing number 2216; A Landing A Day blog post number 644.

Dan:  I tend to complain when I land in this OSer state because of the out-of-whack frequency of my landings here in . . . UT; 85/61; 5/10; 2; 149.9.  But I won’t complain this time. . . .

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

How about that!  Another out-in-the-boonies landing in UT or NV!  Oops.  I said I wouldn’t complain.  I think I’ll just get on with my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to west-central UT.  Click on the link and then hit the back button after viewing:

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=coj1rufyRa&w=820&v=3

My watershed analysis will be done courtesy of GE, because my Street Atlas map doesn’t show any streams anywhere close.  Here’s a closer-in view of my drainage path:

GE landing 3a

And here’s the extended view:

GE landing 3b

Which shows that a hypothetical raindrop that falls on my landing would make it all the way to the Great Salt Lake Desert, and then to the Great Salt Lake (assuming a mammoth rain event like the once-every-thousand-year storm).  This is my 21st landing in the Great Salt Lake watershed.

You can see by my landing map that I have little choice but to feature Garrison.  Baker is in NV (and I already featured Baker in an excellent June 2010 post).  But let me tell you, there’s not much to say about Garrison.  I did find a pretty good website (GreatBasinHeritage.org) that at least gives me some information:

The first settlers in the area that would later become known as Garrison were youngsters. Daniel Gonder was only 19 when he arrived in 1861 and decided to settle on Snake Creek. Willard Burbank was only 17 when he decided to settle in Burbank Meadows. They chose land near creeks that could be used for irrigation. Ike Gandy came to Snake Valley before he was 20 and George Samuel Robison arrived when he was only 13. It was only through sheer grit that these young men would carve out a living and become well-known family names in the valley.

Garrison was named for Emma D. Garrison who was the first postmaster. The first post office was established December 2, 1886.

In 1922, Otto Meek convinced his friend who was a Hollywood film director to use Snake Valley as the set for a movie about pioneers crossing the plains.

The film is considered to be the first full length epic motion picture western ever made and it became a classic. It was called “The Covered Wagon” and it was filmed by Paramount Pictures.

The flat benchland just south of Garrison was selected as the primary site for filming (although other locations in Utah and Nevada were also used). Preuss Lake was selected to serve as the North Platte River.  Nearly everyone in the Valley was hired to work on the set.

The movie follows two covered wagon caravans through desert heat, mountain snows, Indian attacks and starvation.  Human interest is provided by a love triangle as pretty Molly must choose between Sam, a brute and Will, the dashing captain of one of the caravans with a skeleton in his closet.

Here’s an old movie poster (from Wiki):

The_Covered_Wagon_poster

Here’s a GE Panoramio shot (by qfl247) of Preuss Lake, looking west to give you a feel for the setting of the movie:

pano preuss lake qfl247

I found a 9-minute You Tube clip from the movie.  It’s funny how it talks about starting in Missouri, but then showing tall mountains in the background that look like the area south of Garrison.

 

As usual, I’ll close with some shots near my landing.  Here’s a GE Pano shot by jcfz taken about 6 miles southeast of my landing:

pano jcfz

About seven miles due south is Crystal Peak.  I lifted this shot of the peak from my Black Rock UT post (August 2009), when I landed about 20 miles east of here.  As typical for my earlier posts, I didn’t bother to give anyone credit for the photo:

crystal-peak

Here’s a Pano shot by Janice Gee taken on the flank of the mountain:

pano Janice Gee

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Greenville, Florida

Posted by graywacke on October 1, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Landing number 2215; A Landing A Day blog post number 643.

Dan:  For the fourth time in the last 24 landings, I’ve landed in this USer . . . FL; 35/48; 5/10; 1; 149.5.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

You can see the nearby Econfina River on the above map, so I’ll jump right in to my watershed analysis, which is very simple:

landing 3

As you can see, I landed in the watershed of the Econfina River (1st hit ever!) which discharges to the Gulf.  Econfina?  What a strange name.  It almost sounds like one of those phony-sounding corporate names.  But there’s nothing phony about the origin of the name Econfina.  From Wiki:

The name “Econfina” derives from the Creek ekana, which means “earthy”, and feno, which means “bridge”.

The “bridge” (which is apparently not around anymore) was likely something similar to a “natural bridge” over the nearby Chipola River.  It just so happens I wrote about the Chipola River natural bridge in my Marianna Florida post from June of 2014.  From that post:

There is a feature of particular interest in the Park [the Florida Caverns State Park]:  the natural bridge over the Chipola River.  When we hear “natural bridge”, we likely imagine something that might look like this:

ayres_natural_bridge_park_wyoming

The above photo is a Wiki shot of Ayres Natural Bridge in Wyoming.  Really cool spot!

But hey, that’s Wyoming, and this is Florida.  In case you’ve forgotten, Florida is flat.  So, instead of the bridge raised above the river like the photo, in Florida, the “bridge” is at the same elevation as the surrounding land.  The river dips down below the ground (in an underground channel).  So when you come upon it, there really isn’t much to see.

Here’s a picture (from the Explore Southern History website) of where the Chipola River appears to end (it’s flowing away from the photographer).  Of course, it’s really just briefly disappearing into the subsurface, under the “natural bridge.”

eplore-southern-history-bridge

Here’s a little write-up from the Florida Caverns website:

In 1818, Andrew Jackson’s army crossed the Natural Bridge of the Chipola during the First Seminole War. Captain Hugh Young, a topographer assigned to the army, wrote:

“The Natural Bridge is in the center of a large swamp and appears to be a deposit of earth on a raft or some similar obstruction. The passage is narrow and the creek, with a rapid current is visible both above and below.”

Captain Young was wrong, of course, about the nature of the bridge. It actually is formed by the unique karst topography of the area. The river flows down into a sink, travels under the ground for a short distance and then rises back to the surface.

So I figure that there used to be a natural bridge on the Econfina, which collapsed long ago (likely prehistorically) and is no more.  But while it was around, the Indians called it ekana fino, or earthy bridge.

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to the eastern end of the Florida Panhandle (click on the link and hit the back button after viewing):

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=cojh20fyUu&w=820&v=3

As I mentioned above, I’ve been landing in Florida quite frequently.  Here’s a shot of Florida and surrounding states showing my landings since January 2013. 

GE 1

Note the 7 landings in Florida vs. zero in Alabama and one or two in the surrounding states.  That’s just how the cookie crumbles and the Landing God operates . . .

I landed in the woods about a half mile from a road with Street View coverage:

GE SV map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

GE SV landing

I love it!  The sign says KEEP OUT    CAMERA ON.  So the Google Cam and the security cam were going lens to lens.

I also found a nearby SV shot of the Econfina:

GE SV map river

It ain’t much, but here’s the not-so-mighty Econfina:

GE SV river

So . . . . looking back up at my local landing, you can see numerous small “towns” in the vicinity of my landing:  Shady Grove, Lake Bird, Sirmans and Eridu.  In spite of some interesting names, these towns are:

aa-hookless

So that leaves Greenville (pop 843).  It, too, is pretty much hookless, but I did note a hook-worthy native son:  Ray Charles.  In fact, the town has a great Ray Charles statue in Haffye Hayes park.  Here’s a picture from the FloridaZone Blogspot:

raycharles

 

So what’s the connection, one might ask, between Ray Charles and the sleepy little town of Greenville?  From the Ray Charles Wiki write-up:

Ray Charles Robinson (1930 – 2004) was the son of Aretha Robinson, a sharecropper, and Bailey Robinson, a railroad repair man, mechanic, and handyman.  When Ray was an infant, his family moved from his birthplace in Albany, Georgia to his mother’s hometown of Greenville, Florida.

I’ll just pick and choose some snippets of his fascinating life story from Wiki:

. . . his musical curiosity was sparked at Mr. Wylie Pitman’s Red Wing Cafe, when Pitman played boogie woogie on an old upright piano; Pitman subsequently taught Ray how to play piano himself . . .

…  Ray’s brother George drowned in Aretha’s laundry tub when he was four years old, and Ray was five . . .

. . . Ray started to lose his sight at the age of four and was completely blind by the age of seven, apparently as a result of glaucoma . . .

. . . Aretha used her connections in the local community to find a school that would accept blind African American students. Despite his initial protest, Ray would attend school at the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind in St. Augustine from 1937 to 1945 …

. . . Ray began to develop his musical talent at school and was taught to play the classical piano music of Bach, Mozart and Beethoven . . .

. . . his teacher Mrs. Lawrence taught him how to read music using braille, a difficult process that requires learning the left hand movements by reading braille with the right hand and learning the right hand movements by reading braille with the left hand, and then synthesizing the two parts . . .

. . . while Charles was happy to play the piano, he was more interested in the jazz and blues music he heard on the family radio than classical music . . .

. . . he established “RC Robinson and the Shop Boys” and sang his own arrangements at the school . . .

. . . Aretha died in the spring of 1945, when Charles was 14 years old. Her death came as a shock to Ray, who would later consider the deaths of his brother and mother to be “the two great tragedies” of his life. Charles returned to school after the funeral, but was then expelled in October for playing a prank on his teacher. . .

. . . after leaving school, Charles moved to Jacksonville with a couple who were friends of his mother. He played the piano for bands at the Ritz Theatre in LaVilla for over a year, earning $4 a night…

. . . he decided to leave Jacksonville and move to a bigger city with more opportunities . . .

. . . at age 16, Charles moved to Orlando, where he lived in borderline poverty and went without food for days . . .

. . . in 1947 (at age 17) Charles moved to Tampa, where he had two jobs: one as a pianist for Charlie Brantley’s Honeydippers, a seven-piece band; and another as a member of a white country band called The Florida Playboys. This is where he began his habit of always wearing sunglasses. . .

(He moved to Seattle, hooked up with some other musicians, began touring; formed his own group, and finally started to make it.)

. . . in April 1949, Ray and his band recorded “Confession Blues”, which became his first national hit, soaring to the second spot on the Billboard R&B chart . . .

He began to cross over from the R&B chart to the Pop chart and the rest, as they say, is history.

I must do a couple of You Tube videos.  I’ll start with one of his older hits, “What’d I Say.”  Here’s a great live version from Sao Paulo Brazil in 1963:

 

And, of course, I absolutely must do “Hit the Road, Jack,” performed by an older Ray (1996, at age 66) on Saturday Night Live:

 

I’ll get back briefly to the Econfina.  It empties into the Gulf, not cutting through a sandy beach, but instead making it’s way through an extensive wetland zone.  Here’s a GE shot:

GE 2

And a Pano shot (by kcureton) of what it looks like along the river:

pano joec

And another (by a full-blooded Italian from Rome, Stefano Gramitti Ricci) of a house just a couple miles upstream:

pano stefano gramitto ricci

I’ll close with a couple of Pano shots much closer to my landing (with a couple of miles), both by Ken Badgley.  First, a barn:

pano ken badgley

And then, this great old 30s-vintage car:

pano ken badgley 2

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »