A Landing a Day

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Garrison, Utah

Posted by graywacke on October 5, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Landing number 2216; A Landing A Day blog post number 644.

Dan:  I tend to complain when I land in this OSer state because of the out-of-whack frequency of my landings here in . . . UT; 85/61; 5/10; 2; 149.9.  But I won’t complain this time. . . .

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

How about that!  Another out-in-the-boonies landing in UT or NV!  Oops.  I said I wouldn’t complain.  I think I’ll just get on with my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to west-central UT.  Click on the link and then hit the back button after viewing:

//screencast-o-matic.com/embed?sc=coj1rufyRa&w=820&v=3

My watershed analysis will be done courtesy of GE, because my Street Atlas map doesn’t show any streams anywhere close.  Here’s a closer-in view of my drainage path:

GE landing 3a

And here’s the extended view:

GE landing 3b

Which shows that a hypothetical raindrop that falls on my landing would make it all the way to the Great Salt Lake Desert, and then to the Great Salt Lake (assuming a mammoth rain event like the once-every-thousand-year storm).  This is my 21st landing in the Great Salt Lake watershed.

You can see by my landing map that I have little choice but to feature Garrison.  Baker is in NV (and I already featured Baker in an excellent June 2010 post).  But let me tell you, there’s not much to say about Garrison.  I did find a pretty good website (GreatBasinHeritage.org) that at least gives me some information:

The first settlers in the area that would later become known as Garrison were youngsters. Daniel Gonder was only 19 when he arrived in 1861 and decided to settle on Snake Creek. Willard Burbank was only 17 when he decided to settle in Burbank Meadows. They chose land near creeks that could be used for irrigation. Ike Gandy came to Snake Valley before he was 20 and George Samuel Robison arrived when he was only 13. It was only through sheer grit that these young men would carve out a living and become well-known family names in the valley.

Garrison was named for Emma D. Garrison who was the first postmaster. The first post office was established December 2, 1886.

In 1922, Otto Meek convinced his friend who was a Hollywood film director to use Snake Valley as the set for a movie about pioneers crossing the plains.

The film is considered to be the first full length epic motion picture western ever made and it became a classic. It was called “The Covered Wagon” and it was filmed by Paramount Pictures.

The flat benchland just south of Garrison was selected as the primary site for filming (although other locations in Utah and Nevada were also used). Preuss Lake was selected to serve as the North Platte River.  Nearly everyone in the Valley was hired to work on the set.

The movie follows two covered wagon caravans through desert heat, mountain snows, Indian attacks and starvation.  Human interest is provided by a love triangle as pretty Molly must choose between Sam, a brute and Will, the dashing captain of one of the caravans with a skeleton in his closet.

Here’s an old movie poster (from Wiki):

The_Covered_Wagon_poster

Here’s a GE Panoramio shot (by qfl247) of Preuss Lake, looking west to give you a feel for the setting of the movie:

pano preuss lake qfl247

I found a 9-minute You Tube clip from the movie.  It’s funny how it talks about starting in Missouri, but then showing tall mountains in the background that look like the area south of Garrison.

 

As usual, I’ll close with some shots near my landing.  Here’s a GE Pano shot by jcfz taken about 6 miles southeast of my landing:

pano jcfz

About seven miles due south is Crystal Peak.  I lifted this shot of the peak from my Black Rock UT post (August 2009), when I landed about 20 miles east of here.  As typical for my earlier posts, I didn’t bother to give anyone credit for the photo:

crystal-peak

Here’s a Pano shot by Janice Gee taken on the flank of the mountain:

pano Janice Gee

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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