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Archive for July, 2016

Mount Washington, New Hampshire

Posted by graywacke on July 30, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2285; A Landing A Day blog post number 715.

Dan:  As my regular readers would strongly suspect, this is my first New Hampshire landing since I changed my random lat/long methodology.  Of course, NH is a USer, although because it’s so small, my Score didn’t drop much (from 752 to 750).  Curious, but don’t have a clue about “USer” and “Score?”  Check out “About Landing (Revisited),”  Not curious, just keep reading.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

 

And my local landing map:

landing 2a

I’ll zoom in a little, just to show that there are many named peaks here in the Presidential Range:

landing 2b

We all remember Presidents Tom, Field & Willey.  And wait, you can’t fool me!  Ben Franklin was never a president!

Because I’m in a topographically-dramatic area (and topography controls drainage, even though drainage created topography), I’ll jump right in to my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight.  Click HERE, and enjoy a rare trip to New England (and then hit your back button).

Here’s an oblique GE shot looking north past my landing towards Mount Washington:

ge1

It’s obvious I landed in the watershed of the Dry River (first hit ever!).  Before I go to streams-only maps, here’s another GE shot, this one looking from near the peak of the mountain south towards my landing:

ge2

To chase my drainage downstream from the Dry River, here’s a streams-only StreetAtlas map:

landing 3a

As you can see, when it’s not dry, the Dry discharges to the Saco (3rd hit).  Zooming back, you can see that the Saco makes its way across Maine before discharging directly into the Atlantic Ocean:

landing 3b

Returning to GE, I was looking for a Street View shot of the Dry.  There’s no bridge over the Dry, but there’s Street View coverage right along the river about 4 miles from my landing, showing where the Dry enters the Saco.

ge sv dry map 4 mi from landing

The Orange Dude sees the Dry (straight ahead); the Saco is coming in from the left:

ge sv dry

I traveled about 8 miles south of my landing for another look at the Saco:

ge sv saco map

Here’s what the Orange Dude sees:

ge sv saco

Moving right along . . . not only is this my first NH landing since I changed my random lat/long selection method (a mere 69 landings ago), this is my first NH landing since I began blogging (a huge 715 landings ago)!  In fact, my last landing in NH was landing 1532 (2285-1532 = 753 landings ago).

How cool is it that this initial ALAD NH landing allows me to feature Mount Washington? 

Anyway, my first thought was more-or-less as follows:   “Everyone knows that Mount Washington is the highest mountain east of the Mississippi.  I wonder what the second highest mountain is?”

 I found a USA Today website that said:

The highest peaks east of the Mississippi all reside in the Blue Ridge province of the Southern Appalachians, most notably in the Black and Great Smoky mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee.

Say what?  How could that be?  I checked the elevation of Mount Washington:  6,288.  And then I looked at the top ten, going from #1 (Mount. Mitchell) at 6,684 through #10 at 6,410. 

Oh my!  Mount Washington isn’t even in the top 10 east of the Mississippi!  I’m a geographer and a geologist, and I’ve been clueless my entire life!  I’m eating both crow and humble pie.  My only excuse is that I’ve never been to the Smokey Mountains.

Once I regained my equilibrium, I wanted to see where Mount Washington ranked.  After a lengthy internet search, I could find no comprehensive list, ranking all mountains east of the MM.  However, I did find a list entitled “South Beyond 6,000” (only showing southern mountains above 6000 feet).  I got down to #15, Waterrock Knob at 6292.  #16 is Roan High Knob at 6285. 

So.  Mount Washington at 6288 is the 16th highest mountain east of the Mississippi.

But wait!  Wiki says that Mount Washington is “the most prominent” peak east of the Mississippi.  I assume that “prominent” means that if you’re in the vicinity of the mountain, it’s prominence is a measure of how dramatically it arises from the surrounding landscape.  Like Mount Rainier, the most prominent mountain in my personal experience.

Wiki has a technical discussion of “topographic prominence,” but it seemed quite opaque and non-intuitive, so I won’t bother with it. 

Moving right along to the weather.  I was generally aware (as you might be also) that Mount Washington holds (held?) the record for the highest wind speed.  From Wiki:

Mount Washington once held the world record and still holds the Northern Hemisphere and Western Hemisphere record for directly measured surface wind speed, at 231 mph, recorded on the afternoon of April 12, 1934.

A new wind speed record was discovered in 2009: on April 10, 1996, Tropical Cyclone Olivia had created a wind gust of 254 mph at Barrow Island off the coast of Western Australia.

Funny how the record was “discovered.”  I take it that no one had bothered to look at some electronically-recorded measurements stored on a data logger.

Anyway, Wiki goes on to say that hurricane-force wind gusts are recorded on the summit an average of 110 days per year!!

How about temperatures?  Take a close look at the following table:

Untitled

AYKM?  The all time record high temp is 72!?!  The warmest month of the year (July), has an average high temp of 54?!?

This is one cold place.  And with the wind, one can only imagine the wind chills.

Time for some GE Pano shots of (what else?) Mount Washington.  I’ll start with this one by Taoab:

pano taoab

And check out this springtime shot by ®mene of the mountain looking past (what else?) the Mount Washington Hotel.  Think it’s a little colder up on the mountain?

pano ®mene

Moving a little closer to my landing, here’s a shot by Neil-Thompson taken just up the hill from my landing (which is somewhere off to the left).  That’s the Dry River valley to the left and in the distance.

pano Neil-Thompson

I’ll close with this shot by Jim Salge, taken between my landing and Mount Washington. 

pano jim salge

 

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

 

 

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Richwood, West Virginia

Posted by graywacke on July 24, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2284; A Landing A Day blog post number 714.

Dan:  After a brief sojourn to UServille, it’s back to OSers (11 of my last 12 landings), with today’s West Virginia landing.  Yes, I’ve landed in WV one other time since I changed my random lat/long methodology.

If the last paragraph is a head scratcher, check out “About Landing (Revisited),” above.  If you have no itch to scratch, just keep reading . . .

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

My watershed analysis is based on three streams-only maps.  I’ll start with this one:

landing 3a

It shows that I landed in the watershed of Manning Branch; on to the Laurel Creek.  Zooming back a little, we can see that the Laurel discharges to the Cherry River (first hit ever!), on to the Gauley R (2nd hit):

landing 3b

OK, so I have to zoom back one more time so we can see that the Gauley makes its way to the Kanawha (13th hit), on to the Ohio (139th hit):

landing 3c

Of course, the Ohio joins the MM (895th hit).

You’ll never guess what comes next.  OK.  So you (and every other regular reader) guessed.  Well, here’s my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight to SE WV.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

There was no worthwhile GE Street View coverage for my landing, but I did find coverage for the Cherry River:

ge sv cherry r map

Here’s what the Orange Dude sees (looking downstream):

ge sv cherry r down

And upstream:

ge sv cherry r up

Moving right along . . . before I checked out Richwood, I noticed this Panoramio shot while perusing GE:

ge nancy hart grave

The Panoramio picture of Nancy Hart’s grave is less than inspirational, but I went to Wiki where they had a better one:

wiki grave

I wasn’t thrilled with the Wiki article about Nancy, but found CivilWarWomenBlog, with a post about Ms. Hart by Maggie MacLean.  Quite the lady, that Nancy Hart.  Here are some excerpts (most of the post, actually) – it’s a little long, but well worth the read:

Nancy Hart, a Confederate spy and soldier, was born in 1846, in Raleigh, North Carolina. When she was an infant, her family moved to Tazewell, Virginia.

In 1853, Nancy and her family moved in with her sister and brother-in-law, Mary and William Clay Price. In the next six years, Nancy lived in the wilderness of Roane County, Virginia—now West Virginia. She became an excellent shot with a rifle and an expert rider.

After the Civil War began, western Virginia became a dangerous place. The citizenry held divided loyalties—some pro-Confederate and many pro-Union. Neighbors, friends, and families were separated by their opposing beliefs.

William Price didn’t volunteer for service, but he aided the Confederate army when he could. In October 1861, a party of Union soldiers rode into the Prices’ yard. They announced that they were taking William to the town of Spencer for questioning. William never made it to Spencer. He was found three days later, shot in the back.

This fueled Nancy’s hatred for the Union cause. Three days later, she joined the Moccasin Rangers—a group of pro-Southern guerrillas led by Perry Conley. Nancy Hart rode at the head of the column with Perry for about two years, during 1861 and 1862, throughout the central counties of western Virginia.

[She rode at the head of the column!  Either she impressed Perry greatly, or . . .]

She carried messages between the Southern Armies, traveling alone by night and sleeping during the day. She also saved the lives of many wounded Confederate soldiers by hiding them with sympathizers.

Nancy posed as a farm girl and peddled eggs and vegetables to the Yankees in order to spy on them. She scouted isolated Federal outposts in the mountains and reported their strength, population, and vulnerability to General Stonewall Jackson. Nancy led Jackson’s Cavalry on several raids against Union troops.

[Her resume is getting quite impressive!]

After Perry Conley was killed by Union troops in the summer of 1862, the Moccasin Rangers disbanded and Nancy married Joshua Douglas.  They moved into the mountains of Nicholas County, near the Confederate lines, where she continued to carry information to the regular forces while passing as an innocent country girl.

Later that same summer, a large reward was offered for Nancy’s capture. She was recognized, captured and held prisoner in Summersville WV in the upstairs portion of a dilapidated house, with soldiers quartered downstairs and a sentry with her at all times.

While in captivity, she was photographed:

wiki nancy hart

One evening, Nancy grabbed the pistol from her naive young guard, and shot him dead with a single shot. She leapt out a second-story window into a clump of tall jimson weeds, stole a horse, and escaped behind Confederate lines.

[Wow.]

About a week later at 4:00 am, Nancy returned to Summersville with 200 Confederate cavalrymen. The Rebel troops came storming up the road, overran the pickets located about a quarter of a mile from the headquarters, and entered the streets of the town without opposition. The officers and soldiers were caught sleeping and fell an easy prey.

After setting fire to three houses,destroying two wagons, and taking eight mules and twelve horses, the raiders retreated, taking their prisoners with them. Nancy had her revenge.

Nancy faded out of the picture as an active partisan after that incident, but it is more than likely that she lent a helping hand, whenever possible, until the end of the war. She knew that a rope awaited her if captured again

After the war, Nancy and her husband settled down on a mountain farm near Richwood and there they passed the rest of their lives.

Nancy Hart Douglas died in 1913 (outliving her husband by 8 years), and was buried on Manning’s Knob, a mere half mile from one of the “landing” locations associated with the world-famous blog, “A Landing A Day.

There you have it.  Moving on to Richwood.  After perusing Wiki, the only thing that caught my eye was this:

Richwood calls itself the “Ramp Capital of the World” and hosts a large festival every April in honor of the pungent wild leek.

Ramp?  Pungent wild leek?  This requires research!

Well, I didn’t have to look any further than the town’s website.  Here’s a screen shot of part of the website:

website page

And this, also from the website:

website page2

Continuing:

Ramps (wild leeks, part of the Ramson family of plants) are the first green things to show their heads in spring in the Appalachian woodlands and are found in the rich woodlands of upper elevations. They taste somewhat like an onion with a garlicky flavor and a strong odor. The plants grow about a foot tall and, when eaten, a strong odor emanates from the skin of the ramps gourmand.

[Wait a sec!  The skin of the ramps gourmand (i.e., the eater), stinks?  I can only imagine what the festival smells like . . .]

At the Festival, the “little stinkers” will be served with ham, bacon, fried potatoes, brown beans and cornbread.

The website has a couple of videos.  First, here’s a Ramp Festival feature on a local TV news show (WCHS, Charleston)7:

And then, here’s a video on how to harvest ramps:

The website had links to numerous recipes;  I selected this quick and easy one by Emeril Lagasse (on the Food Network website):

Ingredients

2 pounds ramps, trimmed and cleaned

1/4 pound apple-smoked bacon, julienned*

Salt and black pepper

Directions

In a large pot bring 2 quarts of salted water to a boil and add ramps. Cook until tender, about 4 minutes. Transfer to an ice bath and remove when chilled. Drain on paper towels.

In a skillet cook bacon until crisp. Using a slotted spoon, transfer bacon to a paper towel to drain. Add ramps to bacon fat in skillet and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Sauté until lightly caramelized and serve immediately, garnished with reserved crispy bacon.

       *I’m no foodie, so I had to look up “julienne.”  It means to cut into short, thin strips.

Next time I see ramps at the market, I’ll have to pick some up . . .

I’ll close with this GE Pano shot by by Niro, taken about 12 miles SE of my landing.  And, no, there is no typo in the previous sentence.  The photographer’s handle is “by Niro.”

pano by niro

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

 

 

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Moultrie, Georgia

Posted by graywacke on July 20, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2283; A Landing A Day blog post number 713.

Dan:  Phew.  Finally.  Thanks, Georgia.  Not only are you an OSer, but you’re a first-time landing since I changed my random lat/long methodology.

My Score went down (from 773 to 747), a step in the right direction on what should be an inexorable march to a small number, asymptotic to zero.

Check out “About Landing (Revisited),” to answer most questions you might have about the above.  Still have more questions?  Then check out good ol’ “About Landing.”

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

I can tell you right off that Sigsbee and Funston are totally hookless (even though I like both names). 

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of the Ochlockonee River (3rd hit):

landing 3

The not-so-mighty Ochlockonee makes its way south through the Florida Panhandle to the G of M.

I’m anxious to get a look at the Ochlockonee, so it’s time for my Google Earth (GE) trip from the outer fringes of the atmosphere to a rural patch of S Georgia.  Click HERE, then hit your back button.

I figured there was just about a zero chance for Street View coverage on the little road near my landing.  Well, it may have been just about a zero chance, but obviously not a 0.0 chance!  Check it out:

ge sv landing map

 

And here, peeking between the bushes visible on the above shot, is what the Orange Dude sees:

ge sv landing

I had him turn 90o to show you the road that the Googlemobile driver decided to photograph:

ge sv landing 2

Makes one wonder . . . are the Google drivers paid by the hour, and do they make their own decisions about coverage?  Not far west of here, the road dead ends . . .

As mentioned above, I wanted to get a look at the Ochlockonee, and it turns out that I could get a look just a couple of miles west:

ge sv ochlock map

And here’s what the Orange Dude sees:

ge sv ochlock

Just for the heck of it, I went down river to Moultrie to get another look (and to prove to myself and my readers that this is, in fact, the Ochlockonee River):

ge sv ochlock moultrie

OK, OK.  So the sign’s a little tough to read . . .

So anyway, on to Moultrie – a pretty big town by ALAD standards (pop 14,300).  The town was named after William Moultrie, Revolutionary War hero.  Very briefly, from Wiki:

William Moultrie (1730 – 1805) was a planter and politician who became a general from South Carolina in the American Revolutionary War. As colonel leading a state militia, in 1776 he prevented the British from taking Charleston.  Fort Moultrie [and Moultrie GA] was were named in his honor.

I found Moultrie to be pretty much hookless, with the exception of two native sons.  I’ll start with Ron O’Quinn, an old-school DJ of some repute.

There’s not too much to say, really.  He started out on the radio in Moultrie, and he developed that 1960s fast-talking DJ shtick.  He spent some time doing pirate radio off the coast of England.  While there, he met the Beatles, and actually got to know them quite well.  In fact, he toured with them on their last US tour. 

He has a particular claim to fame.  Wiki states the following:

During his time at Radio England, O’Quinn accompanied The Beatles on their 1966 U.S. Tour. It is O’Quinn who coughs in the studio during the count-in to Taxman.[citation needed]

I usually don’t bother with things like “citation needed,” but in this case, it has led to a debate on whose cough made it to the recording.  Listen closely to the very beginning of Taxman (written by George Harrison on Revolver) and you can hear it. 

Because many people are obsessed with all things Beatles, I actually found a lengthy on-line chat (Amazon customers) where several people were debating whether the cough belongs to Ron O’Quinn or George Harrison.

But hey!  Ron himself thinks the cough is his.  One of the chatters referenced a blog (People Like Us, highlighting people from East Central Georgia), with the following Ron O’Quinn quote:

“Because of the notoriety our radio stations received in Europe, I was invited to meet The Beatles at the London offices of Nems Enterprise. The meeting went well and a few days later I was asked if I wanted to attend a recording session at Abbey Road. I did, of course, and while there cleared my throat, coughed actually, on the Tax Man song.”

Time to move on to another Moultrie native son, Jimmy Bryant. From Wiki:

Jimmy Bryant (1925 – 1980) was a prominent American session guitarist. He was billed as “The Fastest Guitar in the Country”.

He teamed up with one Speedy West on the following You Tube video.  These guys can really rock!  Make sure you stick with it.  The second half is awesome.

 

And here’s a funky (and rather racy) clip from the 1963 movie “The Skydivers,” featuring our hero Jimmy Bryant, with his group the Night Jumpers.

 

I discovered a white marble elephant that graces the grave of one W. F. Duggan of Moultrie (in a Moultrie cemetery).  He was one of the founders/operators of the Duggan Brothers Circus (based on some Ancestry.com info).  Evidently, the elephant was a statue of W. F.’s favorite pachyderm.  In addition, I found this little August 1934 newspaper article from the Southern Missourian:

southern missourian newspaper, august 1934

Cape Giradeau, eh?  Well, it’s a pretty big town (pop 38,000) in SE MO.  I wonder how the locals pronounce it?  I’m guessing GEER-ah-doe.  Let me see . . .

Well, one source says jer-ARE-doe.  Another, GEE-rah-dah. And yet another, jer-AH-doe (specifically, no “r” in the 2nd syllable).  And how about Jeer-are-DUE?.  Jer-ARE-doe gets a second vote.  OK.  I’ll stick with the winner, Jer-ARE-doe.

In closing, I’ll share this GE Pano shot by Ross Sims of the aforementioned white elephant.

pano ross sims

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Clinton, Arkansas

Posted by graywacke on July 16, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2282; A Landing A Day blog post number 712.

Dan:  The streak continues:  Arkansas makes ten, count ‘em, ten OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 769 to 773.  This just ain’t right.

Check out my most recent post for some insight to what I’m talking about.  For even more insight, check out “About landing (Revisited)” above.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map (about 6 miles from Clinton):

landing 2

Note that I practically landed on Route 95 (certainly not the Route 95 I’m familiar with).  Street View alert!  Street View alert!

My local landing map clearly shows that I landed in the watershed of the South Fork of the Little Red River (first hit ever!).  Zooming back, here’s a streams-only shot:

landing 3

The S Fork discharges to the Little Red (4th hit); on to the White (27th hit); on to the MM (894th hit).

It’s time to hold on tight to the yellow push pin (especially when temperatures rise during the encounter with the upper atmosphere), as we’ll travel from the near reaches of outer space to the near reaches of my landing.  Click HERE for the trip.

Here’s an oblique Google Earth shot of the immediate vicinity of my landing:

ge 1

And I repeat:  Street View alert! 

Well, sure ‘nuf, there is Street View coverage along Route 95.  I plunked the orange dude down right next to my landing, and here’s what he sees:

ge sv landing

I remember back in the day (OK, maybe three or four years ago), when Google Earth Street View would actually show my push pin when it was close.  Alas, those days are gone . . .

Here’s a GE Panoramio shot by Hogey of the S Fk of the LIttle Red River near Clinton:

pano Hogey, S Fk little red r at clinton

I landed less than five miles from Clinton, so of course I checked it out first.  Doh!  Pretty much hookless.  I expanded my landing map to check out other towns:

landing 2a

This whole area is pretty touristy, which automatically makes it less interesting to me.  And I found the towns also pretty much hookless.  So, back to Clinton (which itself is pretty much touristy).

For example, Clinton is the home of the National Championship Chuckwagon Races.  From chuckwagonraces.com:

National-Championship-Chuckwagon-Races-Clinton-AR

The Chuckwagon Races started out as a Labor Day party for a few friends by Dan and Peggy Eoff. Not one to just sit around at a party, Dan came up with the idea of racing chuckwagons to add something to the party, and his notion of an exciting Labor Day party has mushroomed into the world’s largest chuckwagon race.

Each year, the National Champions in each division take home silver buckles and share in over $25,000 in prizes.  Dan recalls, “We had eight wagons and 200 people showed up one Sunday evening and next year promoted it a little, had 16 wagons and just kept promoting it and it’s got real big. One year, some 30,000 people attended.”

Of course, now there’s live music along with plenty o’ food & drink and souvenirs . . .

I often find things to write about by checking out the GE Panormio shots in the vicinity.  Using this technique, I found another rather touristy (but much more interesting) feature near Clinton:

ge 2

Here’s a Street View shot of the sign directing motorists.  I love the ! . . . 

ge sv bridge

Here are my two favorite Pano shots of the bridge.  First this, by Violetta (aka vetaAL):

pano violetta aka vetaAL

And then this, by ELFHampton (from the same location):

pano ELFHampton

And then I found a very interesting July 2011 article by Suzi Parker (Reuters).  Here are a few excerpts:

It’s not every day that a 3-million-year-old natural sandstone bridge hits the auction block.

But on Friday morning about 20 people gathered at the base of the 120-foot-long bridge for the sale of a legendary Ozark tourist stop.

The first bid, from an unidentified woman in the crowd, was for $100,000. Less than 15 minutes later, it was Jack Smith, an elderly Navy veteran from Conway, Arkansas, who bought the bridge, gift shop, log cabin museum, moonshine still, and 101 acres of forest for $207,900.

The attraction, about 65 miles north of Little Rock, has been called a natural wonder because of its arching rock formation that was used as a wagon bridge by pioneers.

For years, and even today, barn roofs along Highway 65 are painted with advertisements luring tourists down a winding road to see the “world wonder where nature is still the boss.” A covered wagon greets visitors at the entrance.

The bridge has been in the hands of one family since 1973, when Garner Johnson bought the scenic site.

Johnson and his son Bill ran the business until their deaths about 10 years ago. Another son, Royce, now operates it, but he and his two brothers, Wayne and Harold, said they were ready to retire.

“A person can make a living with this property,” Royce Johnson said. “It’s still very successful and, at times, it can get really crazy with tourists.”

Joe David Rice of the Arkansas Tourism Director told Reuters:  “Our hope is that it’s bought by a creative and ambitious entrepreneur who can make it an exciting destination for travelers in the Ozarks.”

I checked out some on-line visitor reviews.  From Trip Advisor (April 2016), this 5-star review:

It is only about a mile in from the highway on this really pretty switchback road through the forest. The guy working there told you the history, which I liked. Made it more alive. It is a small trail but so beautiful. There was two interesting cabins to look through. It took us about 45 minutes to casually look through the whole thing and it was an awesome stretch break on a long trip. I would recommend stopping –  it was the best $5 I’ve spent in a long time.

Oh, OK.  Here’s a pretty funny 2-star review
from Yelp (June 2012):

It costs $5 to look at a rock. The rock looks like a bridge.  It’s neat, but you can’t get any closer than what you would see in a picture, so it’s hardly worth paying.  You don’t get to walk on it or even get near it.  I imagine the fear is that a couple of bubbas would take a late night drinkin’ trip here and try to jump up and down until the rock came tumblin’ down.  So they guard it so you can’t do that, or anything fun near or around it.

There’s a little guard shack disguised as a gift shop in front of it where you pay the man.  After you’ve completed your 5 minute tour ($1 per minute while you’re there), you can go back to the gift shop and buy hillbilly emblazoned junk, but you’re probably not going to because you’re gonna be just as disappointed as I was by this carnival type gimmick.

I’m not saying this isn’t a great greater wonder, but for a 150 yard trail and a little tutorial shack on how to make moonshine, I’ve seen far better for less than $5.

The bathroom had running water – that was cool (but not worth $5).

So anyway . . . of course, I checked out Scotland, AR (just 5 miles SW of my landing), but could find nothing of interest . . . until, that is, I was looking for a Pano shot to close out the post.  I found this, by Hogey (the same photographer who shot the picture of the S Fk of the Little Red River in Clinton), of the erstwhile Scotland Post Office:

pano Hogey Scotland P.O.

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

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Kaw City, Webb City and Whizbang, Oklahoma

Posted by graywacke on July 12, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2281; A Landing A Day blog post number 711.

Dan:  I’ll use the same words I used in my last two posts: AYKM?  Oklahoma makes nine, count ‘em, nine OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 765 to 769.  This just ain’t right.

In fact, I’m going to present the following table, which shows the states listed in order from most undersubscribed (those states where I haven’t landed enough, based on the state’s area; i.e., the negative numbers) to the most oversubscribed (conversely, those states where I’ve landed too often, based to the state’s area; ie. the positive numbers):

Montana -33
Utah -28
Nebraska -25
New Mexico -25
Florida -21
Nevada -21
Georgia -19
Illinois -18
Wisconsin -18
North Carolina -18
Alabama -17
Louisiana -17
New York -16
Virginia -14
Tennessee -14
Kentucky -13
Maine -12
Kansas -11
South Carolina -10
Washington -8
Maryland -4
Michigan -4
Massachusetts -3
Vermont -3
New Hampshire -3
New Jersey -3
Connecticut -2
Wyoming -1
Delaware -1
Rhode Island -1
Mississippi 0
Pennsylvania 1
Ohio 2
Minnesota 3
Idaho 3
Indiana 4
West Virginia 7
Missouri 8
Arkansas 13
North Dakota 23
Arizona 24
Texas 35
Oklahoma 39
California 39
Colorado 43
Iowa 43
Oregon 45
South Dakota 52

 

My last nine landings have been:  CO, SD, IA, AZ, CA, CA, CO, IA and OK.  See what I mean?  All, large positive numbers.  Hmmmm . . . makes one suspicious about the randomness of the random lat/long generating program I use . . .

I mean, really!  How about landing in some of the states at the top of the list?  We’ll just have to wait and see what the Landing God wants to do . . .

Check out “About Landing (Revisited” to understand the above.  (Or not, your choice .  . . )

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

And yes, I did add “Whizbang” to the above map.  More about that later.

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of the Arkansas River (122nd hit), which makes its way to the MM (893rd hit).  Incidentally, the Arkansas is in a solid 6th place on my list of river hits.

And now it’s time to ride the yellow push-pin in from outer space (courtesy of Google Earth).  Click HERE, hold on tight, then hit your back button.

I don’t have much of a Google Earth Street View shot of my landing, but here’s where I can get a look at the lake:

ge sv lake map

And what the orange dude sees:

ge sv lake

We’ll take a quick look at Kaw City and Webb City before focusing on Whizbang.

Kaw City, from Wiki:

Kaw City was named for the Kanza Indians, called the Kaw by locals.

In 1902, the original Kaw City was founded as a farming community in the fertile oxbow bend of the Arkansas River.  By statehood in 1907, it had 486 inhabitants.

It became a booming oil town in 1919, when ‘black gold’ was discovered nearby.   The population jumped to 1,001 in 1930.

[Not 1000.  1001.]

The majority of the town was overcome by a flood in 1923, and then devastated again by the Great Depression.

In the late 1960s, the Army Corps of Engineers constructed Kaw Dam on the Arkansas River. The original town site went underwater permanently in 1976, when the gates of the Kaw Dam closed.

Many buildings in Kaw City were moved to the town’s present location on high ground near the lake. When the water in the lake is exceptionally low, some of the foundations of the old structures can still be seen just above the water.

Enough Kaw City. How about Webb City?  Wiki:

Webb City (pop 62 in 2010).   Webb City post office opened in 1922.

Horace Webb founded the town in 1910 as an agricultural community.  But the history of Webb City is inexorably linked to oil.

Webb City was located at the northern end of the Burbank Oil Field, discovered in 1920. All mineral rights in Osage County were owned by the Osage tribe.   Although the oil find brought a degree of prosperity, Webb City never developed into a modern town. Water was scarce and there was no electricity. The business district had unpaved streets and most of the buildings were built of wood frame and false fronts.

The town began to decline in the late 1920s, as the oil boom faded. In 1928, it was heavily damaged by a tornado, and many of the businesses did not rebuild. The decline continued through the Great Depression. Its high school closed in 1944.

The 1930 census (the first census taken in Webb City) showed 493 residents. The population has declined thereafter.

Here’s a You Tube video about the town (from Oklahoma Ghost Towns):

 

But now for the pee-ess de ree-sis-tahnce.  Whizbang.  Amazingly, I couldn’t really figure out exactly where the town was  (the location on my local landing map is my best guess).  Wiki said it was 1.5 miles north and 1.5 miles west of Shidler (so, about 2 miles NW of town?).  And, there are no GE Pano shots showing any ruins.  Oh, well.

After checking out a couple of You Tube videos, I realize I needn’t say anything about the town; I’ll just let you see for yourself:  From Oklahoma Ghosttowns:

 

Here’s an OETA (Oklahoma Educational TV) story from Oklahoma News:

 

Time for the only GE Pano shot I could find that was worthy of posting.  (By the by, for such a large lake, there is a total dearth of Pano shots showing Kaw Lake.)  Anyway, I found this, by RoadHunter, taken about 12 miles north of my landing:

pano roadhunter

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Woolstock, Iowa

Posted by graywacke on July 8, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2280; A Landing A Day blog post number 710.

Dan:  Just like my last post (Idalia and Joes, Colorado) – AYKM?  Iowa makes eight, count ‘em, eight OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 760 to 765.  This just ain’t right.

Check out “About Landing (Revisited” to understand the above.  (Or not, your choice .  . . )

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Hmmm.  Looks like a lot of towns were ignored when I settled on only Woolstock.  More about that later.

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of the White Fox Creek, which makes its way to the Boone River (first hit ever!).  The Boone heads south, and discharges to the Des Moines River (11th hit):

landing 3a

Zooming back a little, and we see that the Des Moines (after briefly forming the boundary between Iowa and Missouri), discharges to the MM (892nd hit).

landing 3b

So, it’s time for my spaceflight in to central Iowa.  Click Here, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

I checked out GE Street View, and here’s the look I could get at my landing spot:

ge sv landing map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

I went a few miles to the southwest to get this Street View shot of the White Fox Creek:

ge sv drainage

Just like my last landing in east-central Colorado, I’ve managed to find a pretty-much hookless area.  Look at all the towns on my local landing map!  Of course, I checked them all out, and all I could come up with was in the Wiki entry for Woolstock, where it said that a notable native son was George Reeves.

From Wiki, about George:

George Reeves (1914 – 1959) was an American actor. He is best known for his role as Superman in the 1950s television program Adventures of Superman.

His death at age 45 from a gunshot remains a polarizing topic; the official finding was suicide, but some believe that he was murdered or the victim of an accidental shooting.

Oh my.  The Superman TV show started in 1952.  I was two, and my family didn’t own a TV.  We got our first TV in 1955, and I’m sure I started watching Superman soon thereafter (until the show ended in 1958).   I suspect I watched many reruns back in the day as well.

Here’s the intro, which is totally familiar to me:

 

Here’s a screen shot of a small portion of Google Images for George Reeves:

superman images

And a GE Panoramio shot of his birthplace in Woolstock (by jzsni):

pano jzsni george birthplace

Just thinking about Superman reminded me of one of my all-time favorite songs, “Superman’s Song,” by Crash Test Dummies.  Here’s the music, with the words below.  Please give this your attention!

 

Tarzan wasn’t a ladies’ man
He’d just come along and scoop ’em up under his arm, like that
Quick as a cat
In the jungle

Clark Kent, now there was a real gent
He would not be caught sittin’ around in no junglescape,
Dumb as an ape,
Doing nothing

Chorus:
Superman never made any money
For saving the world from Solomon Grundy
And sometimes I despair the world will never see
Another man like him

Hey Bob, Supe had a straight job
Even though he could have smashed through any bank
In the United States, he had the strength, but he would not

Folks said his family were all dead
Their planet crumbled but Superman, he forced himself
To carry on,
Forget Krypton,
And keep going

Chorus

Tarzan was king of the jungle and Lord over all the apes
But he could hardly string together four words: “I Tarzan, You Jane.”

Sometimes when Supe was stopping crimes
I’ll bet that he was tempted to just quit and turn his back on man,
Join Tarzan in the forest
But he stayed in the city, and kept on changing clothes
In dirty old phonebooths till his work was through
And nothing to do but go on home

Chorus

If you loved the song like me, you’ll want to check out the official video.  Here ‘tis, with an intro by the lead dude, Brad Roberts:

 

This got me to thinking about my all-time favorite song posted on ALAD:  Tex Ritter’s Froggy Went a Courtin’, from my December 2013 Carthage, Texas post (Tex was a native son).  This is a gratuitous opportunity to post it again. Here’s the pertinent excerpt from that post:

Then I stumbled on “Froggy Went a Courtin” and just loved it.  I searched high and low for the lyrics, but couldn’t find the words that fit this You Tube version.  So I did the best I could (the “fee fime oh” verses were all transcribed by me!)

 Anyway, here it comes . . . (the following to be said with an exaggerated hillbilly accent) . . the pee-ess  de ree-sis-tunce.



Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, uh, huh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, oh, hoh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride
Sword and a pistol by his side
Uh, huh . . . hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Well he went up-a to Miss-a Mousie’s door and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Went up to Miss-a Mousie’s door, hoh
Went up-a to Miss-a Mousie’s door
She said get away you been here before,
Uh, huh . . . ohmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, uh, huh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, oh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee
Well he said Miss Mousie, ‘Will you marry me’
Uh, huh,  hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm.

Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf, uh, huh
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf
If you want anymore you can sing it yourself
Uh, huh, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Kimbo kymbo hey-ho gee-roh
Hey come a rattrap, pollywinkle lolly bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

I LOVE THIS!   I’ve listened to it 20 times.  I made sure I got the lyrics just right. . .

 So this froggy song is an old folk song, and I mean old.  Wiki (and other sources) have it as a Scottish folk song originating in 1548.

The song has been covered by countless artists, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Burl Ives, the Brothers Four, Elvis Presley, Bruce Springsteen, and Bob Dylan.

Tex Ritter’s rendition of this song will forever remain one of my all-time favorites . . .

I checked out many GE Panoramio shots near my landing, but I had to wander quite a ways off (about 25 miles to the northeast) to find one I deemed worthy of posting (by Jeromeburg):

pano jeromeburg

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Joes and Idalia, Colorado

Posted by graywacke on July 4, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2279; A Landing A Day blog post number 709.

Dan:  AYKM?  Colorado makes seven, count ‘em, seven OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 757 to 760.  This just ain’t right.

Check out “About Landing (Revisited” to understand the above.  (Or not; your choice .  . . )

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of Spring Creek, flowing on to the South Fork of the Republican River (2nd hit):

landing 3a

The stippled blue water course just east of my landing (although not labeled) is also Spring Creek.

Zooming back quite a bit:

landing 3b

The S Fk of the Republican goes (unsurprisingly) to the Republican River (24th hit), on to the Kansas (62nd hit); to the Missouri (413th hit); to the MM (891st hit).

It’s time to fasten your seatbelt, and rapidly descend from outer space right to my landing location.  Click HERE to do just that.

Street View coverage near my landing is non-existent.  I wanted to get a look at Spring Creek, but no luck.  Here’s Street View coverage for the S Fk of the Republican:

ge drainage map

There’s a long bridge over the “river,” but here’s the only view with a little of what appears to be water:

ge drainage

I had the orange dude spin around to get a more complete view of the “river.”  Click HERE to check it out.

Before discussing my titular towns, let me zoom out a little for a slightly-more-expanded landing map:

landing 2a

At first my focus was to the south, where the towns are closer to my landing and there are more of them (including the substantial town of Burlington (pop 4,250).  But these towns are incredibly:

aa-hookless

The towns to the north are not much better.  This is my most hookless landing in recent memory – which gives me the opportunity to let my readers know that I never – absolutely never – reject a landing location because I can’t find anything to write about.  The show – er, I mean blog – must go on.

So what is there to say about Idalia (pop 88)?  This, from Wiki:

There are multiple stories of how the name of the town came to be, but the two most prominent are that it was named after the wife of an early settler, Mrs. Edaliah Helmick. The other story is that it was named after the combined names of Ida Hill and Lehia Means.

As is my wont, ALAD will weigh in on the debate.  The first option, about Idalia being named after Edaliah.  I vote a big thumbs down on this one.  If the lady’s name is Edaliah, then the name of the town would be Edaliah!   Having a town named after you is an honor, but the honor loses its luster if they can’t remember how to spell your name (or, insult you by saying that the way your name is spelled just doesn’t cut it. . . )

Plus, my last name it Hill, and I’m all for Cousin Ida and her good friend Lehia combining their names (more or less) and ending up Idalia . . .

Moving on to Joes.  Cool name, but I could find nothing about the name origin.  However, I did find this, from Wiki:

In 1929, the Joes High School basketball team won the Colorado state basketball championship, defeating teams from much larger Colorado towns such as Fort Collins and Denver. The Joes team then traveled to Chicago to participate in a national championship. The smallest school in the tournament, the “Wonder Boys” advanced to the semifinals before losing to Classen High School of Oklahoma City.

The success was notable given the small size of the school. Author Nell Propst, in his book The Boys From Joes (1988) noted that the ten-man basketball team represented half of the male enrollment in the school, which in 1929 numbered 20 boys and 16 girls. Their 1921 high school lacked a gymnasium, forcing the team to practice on a gravel court outside. The school’s coach, Lane Sullivan, knew little about the sport of basketball and gained most of his knowledge from a book he obtained from a college basketball coach in Kansas.

Joes was a repeat Colorado state champ in 1930.

Amazing.  A school with 20 guys comes up with a great b-ball team!

Here’s the book cover (from Amazon.com):

41zdEDd8NvL._SX261_BO1,204,203,200_

There are three Amazon reviews of the book (all 5-star).  Here they are:

amazon reviews

Enough of E-Cen Colorado trivia. It’s time for some GE Panoramio shots.

First this, by Caleb-Shultz, taken about 11 miles N of my landing.

pano caleb-shultz

Keeping with the 11-miles-from-my-landing theme (which includes the distance to the bridge over the South Fork), here’s an artsy shot by James Phillip Dickerson, taken about 11 miles SE of my landing:

pano james phillip dickerson

I’ll close with this by Giu Ann, taken (of course) about 11 miles SW:

pano giu ann

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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