A Landing a Day

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Posts Tagged ‘Lund NV’

Lund, Nevada

Posted by graywacke on May 23, 2018

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I use an app that provides a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”

I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town or towns I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. 

To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2402; A Landing A Day blog post number 836.

Dan:  Today’s lat/long (38o 46.808’N, 114o 57.666’W) puts me in east central Nevada:

My local landing map:

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of the White River (2nd hit), which appears to dead end:

However, with research and perseverance, I discovered the truth:

The White does in fact dry up completely, but maintains a topographical presence as the Pahranagat Wash; 2nd hit; (not identified on Street Atlas maps; thus my hand-drawn approximation) and which, I am sure, actually flows after heavy rains.  Pahranagat Wash has topographic continuity with the Meadow Valley Wash; 7th hit; (which is identified on Street Atlas).

Meadow Valley Wash has topographic continuity with the Muddy River (8th hit); which, somewhere beneath Lake Mead, joins up with the Virgin River (14th hit); which (also beneath Lake Mead), joins up with the Colorado River (183rd hit).

Get all of that?  You may wonder (as I do myself):  why do I spend so much time and effort to absolutely nail down my watersheds?  My only answer is:  that’s what I do . . .

Considering how far out in the boonies I am, I have excellent Google Earth (GE) Street View coverage:

And here’s what the OD sees:

While I was hanging out in GE, I snapped this oblique shot of my landing:

And zoomed back to get this broader perspective, looking across the White River Valley:

It’s time for true confessions:  I featured Lund in a 2011 post.  Not surprising, considering how isolated the town is.  Anyway, from that post:

Here’s info on Lund, from Wiki:

Lund was named for Anthon Lund, a prominent historical figure from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS, more commonly known as Mormons).  Lund was settled in 1898 on land that the US government had given the LDS as recompense for land that had been confiscated under the Edmunds-Tucker Act.  The population of Lund as of 2005 is 156.

So, I need to check out the Edmunds-Tucker act.  From Wiki:

The Edmunds–Tucker Act of 1887 was passed in response to the dispute between the US Congress and the LDS Church regarding polygamy.

The act punished the LDS Church on the grounds that they fostered polygamy. The act prohibited the practice of polygamy and punished it with a fine of from $500 to $800 and imprisonment of up to five years.   The act was enforced by the U.S. marshal and a host of deputies.

The act:

  • Directed the confiscation by the federal government of all church properties valued over a limit of $50,000.
  • Required an anti-polygamy oath for prospective voters, jurors and public officials.
  • Annulled territorial laws allowing illegitimate children to inherit.
  • Required civil marriage licenses (to aid in the prosecution of polygamy).
  • Abrogated the common law spousal privilege for polygamists, thus requiring wives to testify against their husbands
  • Removed local control in school textbook choice.

Pretty amazing history!  I guess polygamy didn’t quite fall under constitutional religious freedom . . .

As is typical, I found out a little more this time around.  From GreatBasinHeritage.com:

Part of the confiscated properties were large herds of Nevada cattle, which were turned over to three non-Mormon Nevada ranchers.  In 1893, the Edmund Tucker Act was declared unconstitutional and a resolution to restore the confiscated church property was introduced. No action was taken on this until 1896, by which time the cattle herds were severely reduced from poor management, bad investments, and severe winters. The three ranches were obliged to turn over everything they owned as replacement of the cattle they had lost, giving the Mormons the remaining cattle, horses, equipment, and a large piece of land (including Lund) to begin colonizing.

Here’ a Wiki shot of Joseph Smith Leavitt and family, early settlers in Lund.  (Gee.  I wonder who he was named after.) 

I see mom & dad and 7 or 8 kids – it looks to me like the woman on the left might not be one of the kids . . .

As per usual with the lousy pictures now available on GE, I didn’t have much to pick from.  So, here’s a picture by DeCall Thomas of Certified Welding Services Corp, showing what I presume is one of their welds on a electric transmission tower out in the White Valley:

And now, back to my original Lund post:

I’ll close with a picture from Lund, looking south.  As a central New Jerseyan, I must admit that I would love to see mountains in the distance . . .

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2018 A Landing A Day

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Lund and Preston, Nevada

Posted by graywacke on March 11, 2011

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (then every-other-day blog and now a one-to-three-times a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

Dan –  How cruel the LG can be!  Setting me up with a wonderful run of 5 USers in a row, only to be followed up by four OSers, with today’s landing in . . . NV; 77/70; 5/10; 7; 155.9.

Here’s my landing map, showing my proximity to Preston and Lund:


Here’s a broader view:


Here’s my GE shot, showing a vivid, varied desert landscape:


I landed in a valley between two mountain ridges, as shown in this oblique GE shot (looking west):


Here’s a truly wonderful Panaramio shot looking east across my landing valley:


I landed in the White Rock Ck (my 34th watershed with “rock” or “rocky” in its name); on to the Cattle Camp Wash; on to Steptoe Ck; on to Tailings Ck; on to Duck Ck; on to Goshute Lake.  This is the fourth time I’ve landed in the Goshute Lake watershed.  Water that flows into Goshute Lake does not flow out . . .

All I could find about Preston was from Ghosttowns.com:

The town of Preston grew out of a Mormon settlement founded in 1876.  The settlement began to grow rapidly after 1898 with the building of its first store and a post office. With the beginning of the 1900s, a sawmill, and a combination social hall—church, and a four-room cement school were built.

Preston has maintained a serene existence as ranching community through the decades. Preston still has a stable population of about 50. Submitted by: HBC

I stumbled on TheEdje blogspot.com, about a road rally that was held around Preston and Lund.  Here’s a picture, with the caption below:


The view standing on the eastside of Highway 318 looking South from Preston, Nevada toward Lund.  Highway 318 tracks along the westside of the Eagan Mountain Range at the northern end of the rally course down to the Pahroc Mountain Range near Hiko. Image Credit: Edmund Jenks (2008)

Here’s info on Lund, from Wiki:

Lund was named for Anthon H. Lund, a prominent historical figure from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS, more commonly known as Mormons).  Lund was settled in 1898 on land that the United States government had given the LDS as recompense for land that had been confiscated under the Edmunds-Tucker Act.  The population of Lund as of 2005 is 156.

So, I need to check out the Edmunds-Tucker act.  From Wiki:

The Edmunds–Tucker Act of 1887 was passed in response to the dispute between the United States Congress and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) regarding polygamy.

The act disincorporated LDS Church on the grounds that they fostered polygamy. The act prohibited the practice of polygamy and punished it with a fine of from $500 to $800 and imprisonment of up to five years.   The act was enforced by the U.S. marshal and a host of deputies.

The act:

  • Directed the confiscation by the federal government of all church properties valued over a limit of $50,000.
  • Required an anti-polygamy oath for prospective voters, jurors and public officials.
  • Annulled territorial laws allowing illegitimate children to inherit.
  • Required civil marriage licenses (to aid in the prosecution of polygamy).
  • Abrogated the common law spousal privilege for polygamists, thus requiring wives to testify against their husbands
  • Removed local control in school textbook choice.

So, based on the Wiki history of Lund presented above, the Edmunds-Tucker Act must have also granted the LDSers some compensation for the confiscation of church property.  Amazingly interesting history.

I’ll close with a picture from Lund, looking south.  As a central New Jerseyan, I must admit that I would love to see mountains in the distance . . .


t’ll do it. . .

KS

Greg

© 2011 A Landing A Day

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