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Posts Tagged ‘Manti Utah’

Manti, Utah

Posted by graywacke on February 5, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a once or twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2153; A Landing A Day blog post number 581.

Dan:  Today’s landing marks the 41st  straight western / midwestern landing (and an OSer to boot). . . UT; 77/60; 3/10; 19; 149.8. 

Ouch.  149.8.  One more OSer, and my Score will be back over 150, for the first time since nearly a year ago (landing 2088, 1/30/14, Score 150.4).  Oh well . . .

Here’s my regional landing map, showing one of those smack-dab-in-the-middle-of landings:

 landing 1

My local landing map:

 landing 2

Here’s my Google Earth (GE) trip in:

 

I’ll stick with GE for a while.  Here’s a groundlevel view looking north from my landing:

GE ground view looking n

Here’s an oblique shot, looking east up the valley past Manti to my landing.

GE Manti oblique with landing

I moved closer (still looking east).  Mysteriously, my landing symbol became smaller:

GE oblique looking e up Manti valley

Here’s a shot from the top of the ridge looking west past my landing:

GE oblique looking west

Here’s my watershed analysis:

 landing 3

As you can see, I landed in the watershed of South Creek; on to the San Pitch River (3rd hit); on to the Sevier River (11th hit).  The poor Sevier River dries up (and is used for irrigation) before it makes it to a dry lake bed . . .

As we were zooming into my landing on GE, perhaps you noted a nearby landing just to the north.  That was landing 2027 (May 2013), my Ephraim UT post.  There wasn’t much to say about Ephraim, and it being just up the road from Manti, I checked out Manti for something to write about.  Surprise, surprise, I ended up with a Mormon angle (featuring the Manti Temple and the Angel Moroni).  For all of you who want to learn about Manti’s temple and Mr. Moroni, type “Ephraim” in the search box and go at it!

So, while searching for a hook, I noticed that Manti (pronounced “MAN-tie”) was named by Brigham Young after a city mentioned in the Book of Mormon.  No big news there.  But I also noticed that Manti is a type of dumpling in Turkish and Central Asian cuisine.  Here’s what the School of Russian & Asian Studies has to say about Manta:

MANTI

More Than Just Another Dumpling

By Josh Wilson with Andrei Nesterov

Manti are steamed dumplings consisting of ground meat and spices in an unleavened pastry shell. Manti are a popular dish across Central Asia, Pakistan, Northern China, Turkey, and Russia.

They are considered native to Central Asia, but are also thought to have descended from a still-older Chinese dish.  It is likely that the recipe originated with the Uighurs in China, who have long prepared a dish called “mantau,” a name which, in their language, means “bread prepared in steam.”

Here’s a screen shot of a Google Images page for Manti dumplings:

 wiki manti dumplings

Another disambiguation of Manti (according to Wiki) is the name of a constructed language (actually Mänti).  OK, so I had to check this out as well.  From Wiki:

Mänti is a constructed language that Daniel Tammet has created. The word ‘Mänti’ comes from the Finnish word for ‘pine tree’ (mänty).

So who’s Daniel Tammet?  This is where it gets interesting.  From Wiki:

Daniel Tammet  (born 31 January 1979) is an English writer, essayist, translator, and autistic savant. His 2006 memoir, Born on a Blue Day, about his life with high-functioning autism and savant syndrome, was named a “Best Book for Young Adults” in 2008 by the American Library Association.  He has written two other books, Embracing the Wide Sky (2009) and Thinking in Numbers (2012).  His books have been published in 20 languages.

Tammet holds the European record for reciting pi from memory to 22,514 digits in five hours and nine minutes on 14 March 2004.

He has been “studied repeatedly” by researchers in Britain and the United States, and has been the subject of several peer-reviewed scientific papers.  Professor Allan Snyder at the Australian National University has said of Tammet: “Savants can’t usually tell us how they do what they do. It just comes to them. Daniel can describe what he sees in his head. That’s why he’s exciting.”

In his mind, he says, each positive integer up to 10,000 has its own unique shape, colour, texture and feel. He has described his visual image of 289 as particularly ugly, 333 as particularly attractive, and pi, though not an integer, as beautiful. The number 6 apparently has no distinct image; yet what he describes as an almost small nothingness, opposite to the number 9 which he calls large, towering, and quite intimidating.  In his memoir, Tammet states experiencing a synaesthetic and emotional response for numbers and words.

Tammet is a polyglot. In Born On A Blue Day he writes that he knows ten languages: English, Finnish, French, German, Lithuanian, Esperanto, Spanish, Romanian, Icelandic and Welsh.  In ‘Embracing the Wide Sky’, Tammet writes that he learned conversational Icelandic in a week and then appeared on an interview on Kastljós on RÚV speaking the language.

If you haven’t seen Mr. Tammet before, I suggest you watch the following clip from the Letterman show:

 

And here’s a video that features his feat of learning Icelandic in one week:

 

Very intriguing fellow.  If you want to learn more, there are numerous other You Tube clips as well as plenty of info accessible by a Google search.  OK.  Back to Utah.

If you scroll back up to my local landing map, you can see “Manti Canyon Road” and “Skyline Drive.”  These are dirt / gravel /rock roads accessible only in the summer.  Here’s a GE Panoramio shot by MNL77 showing Skyline Drive in the right foreground, just east of my landing:

 pano MNL77

Here are a couple of more shots from Skyline Drive, also by MNL77 (with the second one showing what I think is Manti Canyon Road):

 pano MNL77 (2)

pano MNL77 (3) 

And another one from Skyline Drive, this by RManni (with a bit of his motorcycle showing):

 pano RManni

I’ll close with this lovely shot (also taken just east of my landing) of a July snowfield, by SPDean:

 pano last one by SPDean

That’ll do it.

 KS

Greg

 

© 2014 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Ephraim, Utah

Posted by graywacke on June 24, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much an every-other-day blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2027; A Landing A Day blog post number 445.

 Dan –  Drat!  Thwarted once again!  From getting below 150, that is, due to this OSer landing in . . . UT; 70/56; 5/10; 11; 150.9.  Here’s my regional landing map, showing that I couldn’t have landed more centrally in Utah:

 landing 1

My closer in landing map shows my proximity to Ephraim, which is just up the road from Manti:

 landing 2

My GE shot shows a hilltop landing spot:

 ge 1

Here’s oblique GE shot looking east toward the Wasatch Range:

 ge 2 looking east past landing

Drainage at my landing is a little vague.  But using the GE elevation tool, I was able to ascertain that a drop of rain from my landing would work its way through Ephraim, and on to an unnamed low spot in the agricultural area west of town:

 drainage to low spot

So, what about Ephraim. Well, since I’m smack dab in the middle of Utah, I figured there’d be a Mormon angle.  Hmmm .. .

 From OnLineUtah.com:

Since the 1850s, Sanpete County’s history has revolved around the rivalry of its four leading towns–Mt. Pleasant, Gunnison, Manti, and Ephraim. Ephraim, long portrayed as the epitome of “the Utah farm village,” refused to concede primacy of place to its nearest competitor, even though Manti captured both the county seat and one of Utah’s first four Mormon temples. In the 1950s, Ephraim finally eclipsed all its rivals in size and two decades later passed the Census Bureau’s magic 2,500 mark to become Sanpete’s only urban place.

Way to go, Ephraim!  Just ‘cause Manti got the temple . . .

 Speaking of the Manti temple, here’s a shot from LDSChurchTemples.com, showing the the prophet Moroni in the foreground:

 manti-mormon-temple8

Moroni,eh?  It looks like he was both an angel as well as a warrior/prophet. 

From Wiki:

The Angel Moroni was an angel that visited Joseph Smith, Jr. on numerous occasions, beginning in September 1823.  According to Smith, the angel was the guardian of the golden plates, which Latter Day Saints believe were the source material for the Book of Mormon, buried in a hill near Smith’s home in western New York. Moroni is an important figure in the theology of the Latter Day Saint movement, and is featured prominently in Mormon architecture and art.  Three Witnesses besides Joseph Smith also reported that they saw Moroni in visions in 1829, as did several other witnesses who each said they had their own vision.

Moroni is thought by Latter Day Saints to be the same person as a Book of Mormon prophet-warrior named Moroni, who was the last to write in the golden plates.  The book states that Moroni buried them before he died after a great battle between two pre-Columbian (i.e., American) civilizations.  After he died, he became an angel, and was tasked with guarding the golden plates, and with eventually directing Joseph Smith to their location in the 1820s.  According to Smith, he returned the golden plates to Moroni after they were translated and as of 1838 the angel Moroni still had the plates in his possession.

Phew.  And all of these things Mormon not long after my West Point IL landing, located near an early Mormon settlement (Nauvoo) and near where Joseph Smith was killed (Carthage).

 I’ll finish up some GE Panoramio photos taken from Black Mountain (aka Little Mountain),which is the promontory upon which I landed.  First, this of the Wasatch Range in winter (Mt. Nebo, in particular), taken by none other than BratFace:

 pano brat face mt nebo from landing

I’ll close with a similar shot, taken in the summer, by the one and only StrongBadReggie:

 strongbadreggie from landing to mt nebo

 That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

 

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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