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Posts Tagged ‘Tex Ritter’

Woolstock, Iowa

Posted by graywacke on July 8, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2280; A Landing A Day blog post number 710.

Dan:  Just like my last post (Idalia and Joes, Colorado) – AYKM?  Iowa makes eight, count ‘em, eight OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 760 to 765.  This just ain’t right.

Check out “About Landing (Revisited” to understand the above.  (Or not, your choice .  . . )

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Hmmm.  Looks like a lot of towns were ignored when I settled on only Woolstock.  More about that later.

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of the White Fox Creek, which makes its way to the Boone River (first hit ever!).  The Boone heads south, and discharges to the Des Moines River (11th hit):

landing 3a

Zooming back a little, and we see that the Des Moines (after briefly forming the boundary between Iowa and Missouri), discharges to the MM (892nd hit).

landing 3b

So, it’s time for my spaceflight in to central Iowa.  Click Here, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

I checked out GE Street View, and here’s the look I could get at my landing spot:

ge sv landing map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

I went a few miles to the southwest to get this Street View shot of the White Fox Creek:

ge sv drainage

Just like my last landing in east-central Colorado, I’ve managed to find a pretty-much hookless area.  Look at all the towns on my local landing map!  Of course, I checked them all out, and all I could come up with was in the Wiki entry for Woolstock, where it said that a notable native son was George Reeves.

From Wiki, about George:

George Reeves (1914 – 1959) was an American actor. He is best known for his role as Superman in the 1950s television program Adventures of Superman.

His death at age 45 from a gunshot remains a polarizing topic; the official finding was suicide, but some believe that he was murdered or the victim of an accidental shooting.

Oh my.  The Superman TV show started in 1952.  I was two, and my family didn’t own a TV.  We got our first TV in 1955, and I’m sure I started watching Superman soon thereafter (until the show ended in 1958).   I suspect I watched many reruns back in the day as well.

Here’s the intro, which is totally familiar to me:

 

Here’s a screen shot of a small portion of Google Images for George Reeves:

superman images

And a GE Panoramio shot of his birthplace in Woolstock (by jzsni):

pano jzsni george birthplace

Just thinking about Superman reminded me of one of my all-time favorite songs, “Superman’s Song,” by Crash Test Dummies.  Here’s the music, with the words below.  Please give this your attention!

 

Tarzan wasn’t a ladies’ man
He’d just come along and scoop ’em up under his arm, like that
Quick as a cat
In the jungle

Clark Kent, now there was a real gent
He would not be caught sittin’ around in no junglescape,
Dumb as an ape,
Doing nothing

Chorus:
Superman never made any money
For saving the world from Solomon Grundy
And sometimes I despair the world will never see
Another man like him

Hey Bob, Supe had a straight job
Even though he could have smashed through any bank
In the United States, he had the strength, but he would not

Folks said his family were all dead
Their planet crumbled but Superman, he forced himself
To carry on,
Forget Krypton,
And keep going

Chorus

Tarzan was king of the jungle and Lord over all the apes
But he could hardly string together four words: “I Tarzan, You Jane.”

Sometimes when Supe was stopping crimes
I’ll bet that he was tempted to just quit and turn his back on man,
Join Tarzan in the forest
But he stayed in the city, and kept on changing clothes
In dirty old phonebooths till his work was through
And nothing to do but go on home

Chorus

If you loved the song like me, you’ll want to check out the official video.  Here ‘tis, with an intro by the lead dude, Brad Roberts:

 

This got me to thinking about my all-time favorite song posted on ALAD:  Tex Ritter’s Froggy Went a Courtin’, from my December 2013 Carthage, Texas post (Tex was a native son).  This is a gratuitous opportunity to post it again. Here’s the pertinent excerpt from that post:

Then I stumbled on “Froggy Went a Courtin” and just loved it.  I searched high and low for the lyrics, but couldn’t find the words that fit this You Tube version.  So I did the best I could (the “fee fime oh” verses were all transcribed by me!)

 Anyway, here it comes . . . (the following to be said with an exaggerated hillbilly accent) . . the pee-ess  de ree-sis-tunce.



Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, uh, huh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, oh, hoh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride
Sword and a pistol by his side
Uh, huh . . . hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Well he went up-a to Miss-a Mousie’s door and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Went up to Miss-a Mousie’s door, hoh
Went up-a to Miss-a Mousie’s door
She said get away you been here before,
Uh, huh . . . ohmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, uh, huh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, oh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee
Well he said Miss Mousie, ‘Will you marry me’
Uh, huh,  hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm.

Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf, uh, huh
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf
If you want anymore you can sing it yourself
Uh, huh, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Kimbo kymbo hey-ho gee-roh
Hey come a rattrap, pollywinkle lolly bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

I LOVE THIS!   I’ve listened to it 20 times.  I made sure I got the lyrics just right. . .

 So this froggy song is an old folk song, and I mean old.  Wiki (and other sources) have it as a Scottish folk song originating in 1548.

The song has been covered by countless artists, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Burl Ives, the Brothers Four, Elvis Presley, Bruce Springsteen, and Bob Dylan.

Tex Ritter’s rendition of this song will forever remain one of my all-time favorites . . .

I checked out many GE Panoramio shots near my landing, but I had to wander quite a ways off (about 25 miles to the northeast) to find one I deemed worthy of posting (by Jeromeburg):

pano jeromeburg

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Drakesboro, Kentucky

Posted by graywacke on February 16, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a once or twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2156; A Landing A Day blog post number 584.

Dan:  Today’s landing marks the 44th straight western / midwestern landing (but at least it’s a USer). . . KY; 22/28; 3/10; 22; 150.2.

OK, I have to spend a little time on this lack-of-eastern-landings thing.  Check out this Google Earth (GE) shot:

GE US map

See the north-south yellow line I drew?  Believe it or not, there are 181 landings shown on the map.  How many are east of the yellow line?   A measly 14.  14 out of 181 is only 7.7%.

Now let’s look at the area east of the line vs. west of the line.  This is a pretty easy exercise for me (since all of the state areas are of course in my landing spreadsheet).  Note that I split both Kentucky and Tennessee in half (close enough). 

So, the area east of the line is 561,549 square miles, and the area of the lower 48 is 3,119,994 square miles.  Doing the percentages:  18% of the area is east of the line.

Another way of looking at it:

The landing density for the east is 561,549 square miles divided by 14 landings = 1 landing per 40,110 square miles.

The landing density for the west is 2,558,445 square miles divided by 167 landings = 1 landing per 15,320 square miles.

7.7% of landings in 18% of the area?  Landing densities of 15,000 vs. 40,000? What gives?  Well, I can certainly tell you that over the last 181 landings, the entire eastern U.S. is severely US (Under Subscribed).

And how about 44 landings in a row that haven’t touched the east?  I’ll do the statistics:  Each landing, I have a 0.82 chance of a western / midwestern landing.  Raise that number to the 44th power (and then take the inverse) and I get one chance in 6,197 that I would not land east of the yellow line for 44 straight landings!!!   Phew. . .

So, what do you think?  Since I spent all of this time and effort, my next landing will be in the east?  Maybe . . .

Finally.  Moving right along, here’s my regional landing map:

 landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Wow.  Kind of looks like I landed right in Pond Creek!   I think I’m going to need to look a little closer via Google Earth (GE) to see if I actually landed in the creek.  First, I’ll start with my GE spaceflight in:

 

Now, I’ll zoom in very closely, and son-of-a-gun, if I didn’t actually land in Pond Creek!  So, here’s my watershed analysis:

 GE Pond Creek

I landed in Pond Creek; on to the Green River (9th hit); on to the Ohio R (133rd hit); to the MM (846th hit).

I found a GE Panoramio shot (by RD Anthony) of a car ferry on the Green River about five miles east of my landing.  The ferry is docked on the far side of the river:

pano RDAnthony

So.  I checked out Drakesboro, and found this in Wiki:

Drakesboro is a 5th-class city in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky.  [I wonder if they have an inferiority complex, wishing that one day they’ll be a fourth class city . .  ]  The population was 627 at the 2000 census. Incorporated in 1888, the city was named for early pioneer William Drake.

Nothing much there.  But then, it went on to say this:

The Four Legends Fountain

Constructed in 1992, the Four Legends Fountain honors four pioneers of the “thumb picking” style of guitar playing often associated with Bluegrass music: Kennedy Jones, Ike Everly, Mose Rager, and Merle Travis.  All four have close ties to Muhlenberg County.  Merle Travis is considered a native son of Drakesboro.

FYI, “thumb picking” involves the use of a plastic guitar pick that fits on the thumb.  Besides the thumb, most of the other picking is done by the index finger.  

After a fairly extensive search, I could find one and only one picture of the Four Legends Fountain.  Here it is, a photo by Carey Gough, from Institute193.org:

 institute 193.org foundtain

See the four guitars on the four poles?

Merle Travis is far and away the most famous of the four (and he’s Drakesboro’s own).  Ike Everly is the father of the famous Everly Brothers (featured in my Central City & Rockport KY post of June 2014).  Kennedy Jones actually pioneered the thumb picking style; the other three legends all claimed to have been strongly influenced by “Jonesey.”  Mose Rager gets more attention shortly. 

So, here’s a short video of Merle where he really shows off his thumb picking style:

 

One of my favorite musicians is an acoustic guitar player name of Tommy Emmanuel.  I’ve seen Tommy in concert maybe 5 or 6 times (including a road trip to Ottawa!).  Anyway, Tommy is a great admirer of Chet Atkins and Merle Travis. 

Here’s a You Tube video of Tommy playing Merle Travis’ Guitar Rag.  In Tommy’s intro (which I’ve transcribed below), get this:  he talks about Merle Travis, Mose Rager and Drakesboro Kentucky!!

 

The guy that inspired Chet Atkins was a man named Merle Travis.  And he had a great style; he wrote great songs.  This is one of my favorites of Merle’s.  It’s written about a guy named Mose Rager who opened a barber shop in Kentucky – Drakesboro Kentucky.  And he didn’t cut much hair because he used to sit and play the guitar all day and draw a big crowd, his shop was always full, but no one was getting a haircut.  And legend has it that Mose was a lady killer, and the ones he didn’t kill he crippled up pretty bad.  And so, (laughter) and he had this uh, magnetic attraction; and the people couldn’t resist him.  And he played with a great groove.  Anyway, this is a song about him.  It’s called The Guitar Rag written by Merle Travis.

Well, way down in ol’ Kentucky
There’s a fella mighty lucky
By the way he makes a guitar moan
Hangin’ round, singin’ round a country store
Just pickin’ like a chicken, or pickin’ up corn

And every gal in the county, gathers all around him
Well he’s got rhythm in his bones, yea
My feet start scootin’, the shuffle and drag
Every time I hear the rhythm of the guitar rag

He gets a moanin’ tone, he gets grumble and groan
When he gets pickin’ and pluckin’ the thing
He can make a deacon do the buck-and-wing

All the fat and skinny does a little shimmy
And their heads starts wiggle and wag
My feet start scootin’with the shuffle and drag
Every time I hear the rhythm of the guitar rag

He gets a moanin’ tone, he gets a grumble and groan
Well, he can make a jackrabbit run in the ground
And he can make the Deacon lay the good book down

All the fat and skinny does a little shimmy
And their heads start to wiggle and wag
My feet start scootin’with the shuffle and drag
Every time I hear the rhythm of the guitar rag

My feet start scootin’with the shuffle and drag
Every time I hear the rhythm of the guitar rag

So good ol’ Mose had a barbershop in Drakesboro.  Anyway, I found this short Mose Rager You Tube video:

 

Almost always, I close my post with some GE Pano photos.  Not this time (I could really find any pretty shots any place close to my landing, except the Green River ferry shot).  So I’m close this post a little differently.

A little research showed me that Merle Travis recorded a number of albums with Tex Ritter.  I featured Tex on my 2013 Carthage TX post.  For that post, I found Tex’s version of “Froggy Went A-Courtin,” and painstakingly transcribed the words.  As I said in that post “I LOVE THIS SONG.”

Enjoy!

 

Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, uh, huh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, oh, hoh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride
Sword and a pistol by his side
Uh, huh . . . hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Well he went up to Miss-a Mousie’s door and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Went up to Miss-a Mousie’s door, hoh
Went up-a to Miss-a Mousie’s door
She said get away you been here before,
Uh, huh . . . ohmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, uh, huh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, oh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee
Well he said Miss Mousie, ‘Will you marry me’
Uh, huh,  hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm.

Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf, uh, huh
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf
If you want anymore you can sing it yourself
Uh, huh, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Kimbo kymbo hey-ho gee-roh
Hey come a rattrap, pollywinkle lolly bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

 

That’ll do it.

 KS

Greg

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Carthage, Texas

Posted by graywacke on December 3, 2013

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now more-or-less a twice a week blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean in the first paragraph), please see “About Landing,” (and “Abbreviations” and “Cryptic Numbers”) above.

 Landing number 2066; A Landing A Day blog post number 493.

Dan –  Wow.  Four USers  in a row and on the verge of breaking back down into the 140s, thanks to this landing in . . . TX; 150/181; 4/10; 150.1.  Here’s my regional landing map:

 landing1

My local landing map shows my proximity to (where else?), Carthage:

 landing2

Here’s my streams-only map:

 landing3

As is evident, I landed in the watershed of Irons Bayou, which flows to the Sabine R (17th hit).  As you may or may not know, the Sabine spends quite a bit of its course as the boundary between TX & LA.  But, as you can see by checking out the following map, this happens a bit south of my landing:

 landing4

Here’s my Google Earth (GE) shot, showing (as the Carthage website proudly proclaims) that Carthage is “nestled deep in the piney woods of East Texas.” 

 GE 1

Carthage also declares itself the “Gas Capital” of the United States.  See all of those little clearings in the woods?   Gas wells. . . .

 In fact, Carthage is home to the annual “East Texas Oil & Gas Blast,” which includes (to quote the Carthage website): “Live Music All Day. Door Prizes. Free Children’s Area. Arts & Crafts Vendors. Car Show. Baking Contest. Costume Contest. Lots of Fun!”

 But the big story in Carthage TX is country music.  In fact, Carthage is the home of the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame.  From Wiki:

 texas-country-music

The Texas Country Music Hall of Fame, formerly the Tex Ritter Museum, honors those who have made outstanding contributions to country music and were born in the state of Texas. In the center of the exhibit area, a replica of a 1930s theater marquee reminds visitors of the role of country music in film. A juke box nearby allows visitors to select the country songs that they wish to hear played while touring the museum.

The marquee serves as the entrance to the Tex Ritter Museum. A native of Carthage, Ritter was one of the first singers inducted into the hall of fame when it was established in 1998. There is also a museum exhibit on Ritter’s son, John Ritter.

Just a quick word about John Ritter.  He was the star of TV’s “Three’s Company,” which I more-or-less regularly watched from 1977 – 1984.  He played Jack Ritter, who platonically shared an apartment with two gorgeous young women. 

 Threes-Company

He tragically died of heart problems at age 54 in 2003. 

 Before moving on to John’s dad Tex, it turns out that a second Country Music legend was born in Carthage:  Jim Reeves.  From Wiki:

 Jim Reeves (1923 – 1964) was acountry music singer-songwriter. With records charting from the 1950s to the 1980s, he became well known as a practitioner of the Nashville sound (a mixture of older country-style music with elements of popular music). Known as “Gentleman Jim”, his songs continued to chart for years after his death. Reeves died in the crash of a private airplane that he was piloting. He is a member of both the Country Music and Texas Country Music Halls of Fame.

Jim+Reeves+-+Good+'N'+Country+-+LP+RECORD-478711

I’ll be honest:  Jim’s a ballad crooner; a little too smooth (and corny) for my taste.  I spent some time on YouTube, looking for one of his songs that I actually liked, and came up with Billy Bayou:

 

 “Billy Bayou” has a grand total of 590 views on You Tube.  This compares with “Welcome to my World” (obviously a much more mainstream Jim Reeves song) with over two million views:

 

 Now, moving on to Tex Ritter.  From Wiki:

 Woodward Maurice Ritter (1905 – 1974), much better known as Tex Ritter, was an American country music singer and movie actor popular from the mid-1930s into the 1960s.

Tex+Ritter++The+Singing+Cowboy 

Tex is much more to my taste.  In fact, before my landing, I had heard of him, but knew nothing of him or his music.  Now, I’m a total Tex Ritter fan!!!

I’m going to start with a hilarious song about booze and drunkenness –  the kind of song that just wouldn’t make it today. 

 The words are below, so you can read along:

 

 Jack o’ Diamond, Jack o’ Diamond and I know you of old
You’ve-a robbed-a my poor pockets of silver and gold
It’s a whiskey, you villain, you’ve-a been my downfall
You’ve kicked me, you’ve cuffed me, but I love you for all

And it’s a whiskey, rye whiskey, whiskey I cry
If I don’t get rye whiskey, well, I think I will die

Oooh ah  ooooh, etc. etc.

It’s a-beefsteak when I’m hungry rye whiskey when I’m dry
Greenback when I’m hard up, heaven when I die
I’ll-a go to yonder holler, and I’ll build me a still
I’ll give you a gallon for a five dollar bill

Whiskey, rye whiskey, whiskey, I cry
If a tree don’t fall on me, I’ll live ‘til I die

Oooooh ah ooooh, etc. etc.

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck
I’d dive to the bottom and never come hup (I meant to say “up”)
Now the ocean ain’t whiskey, I ain’t a duck
I’ll play Jack o’ Diamond and trust to my luck

Whiskey, rye whiskey, whiskey I cry
If the whiskey don’t kill me, I’ll live ‘til I die

Ooooh, etc.

Here’s a funny clip (from the 1936 movie “Song of the Gringo”) featuring Rye Whiskey, which you can watch if you’ve a mind to . . .

Then I stumbled on “Froggy Went a Courtin” and just loved it.  I searched high and low for the lyrics, but couldn’t find the words that fit this You Tube version.  So I did the best I could  (all of the “fee fime oh” versus were all transcribed by me!)

 Anyway, here it comes . . . (said with an exaggerated hillbilly accent) . . the pee-ess  de ree-sis-tunce.

 

Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, uh, huh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, oh, hoh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride
Sword and a pistol by his side
Uh, huh . . . hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Well he went up to Miss-a Mousie’s door and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Went up to Miss-a Mousie’s door, hoh
Went up-a to Miss-a Mousie’s door
She said get away you been here before,
Uh, huh . . . ohmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, uh, huh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, oh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee
Well he said Miss Mousie, ‘Will you marry me’
Uh, huh,  hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm.

Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf, uh, huh
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf
If you want anymore you can sing it yourself
Uh, huh, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Kimbo kymbo hey-ho gee-roh
Hey come a rattrap, pollywinkle lolly bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

I LOVE THIS!   I’ve listened to it 20 times.  I made sure I got the lyrics just right. . .

 So this old froggy song is an old folk song, and I mean old.  Wiki (and other sources) have it as a Scottish folk song originating in 1548.

 The song usually has some verses about Miss Mousee getting permission from Uncle Rat, but Tex decided to have none of that.  The song has been covered by countless artists, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Burl Ives, the Brothers Four, Elvis Presley, Bruce Springsteen, and Bob Dylan.

 I’ll close with this Panoramio shot (by RGRiff3471) of the Sabine River, taken about 5 miles north of my landing:

 sabine river rgriff3471

That’ll do it.

 KS

 Greg

 

© 2013 A Landing A Day

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