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Archive for March, 2009

Bridgewater, New York

Posted by graywacke on March 31, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – Oh, all right, so, after my incredible USer string, I now have two OSers in a row. First (of course) MT, now, my most common NE OSer . . . NY; 34/28; 7/10; 25; 163.0.

So, I landed in the Beaver Ck watershed (29th uniquely-named Beaver watershed); on to a new river, the Unadilla, on to the Susquehanna 17th hit); underneath the I-95 bridge near Havre De Grace MD; and on to the Chesapeake Bay.

Here’s a pretty shot of the Unadilla:

unadilla

Here’s my landing map, showing proximity to Bridgewater :

landing34


And, a broader view:

bridgewater_ny

A little history:

BRIDGEWATER was founded in 1797. The surface is uneven, consisting of the valley of the west branch of the Unadilla, which runs through it from north to south, and the adjacent hills. This valley is known as “Bridgewater Flats.” These Flats are celebrated for their fertility and are highly cultivated. In the north-east part is a quarry of excellent limestone, for building purposes. The quarry extends over some 300 or 400 acres, and lies about thirty feet higher than the flats opposite.

The valley of the West Branch of the Unadilla River has been filled to a great depth with glacial drift (i.e., glacially-deposited sediments), and no rock is found within a great depth from the surface. Cedar swamps extend along many of the streams.

Bridgewater contains two churches and about. 300 inhabitants.

Here’s a cool round barn in Bridgewater:

round-barn-in-bridgewater

And an old farm:

old-farm-near-bridgewater

Just outside of Bridgewater is Chittning Pond:

chittning-pond1

Gatesdale Dairy Bar used to be in Bridgewater. Check out their catchy sign:

gatesdale

Here’s a little history on the sign:

The Gatesdale Diner was originally the Gatesdale Dairy Bar. Its previously flashing milk bottle sign is from 1941 when the place opened. The bottle once had “Gatesdale” painted in script. In 2006, they closed and the building was taken over by Dominick’s Italian Bistro. The sign was repainted to represent a wine bottle pouring into a glass.

Here’s the latest version:

dominicks

KS

Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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Opheim, Montana

Posted by graywacke on March 29, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – Well, after this incredible string, I’ll give you just one guess as to which OSer reared its ugly head to ruin the party. Of course, you know who (or is it whom?) I’m talking about . . . MT; 103/81; 7/10; 24; 162.5.

I landed in the E Fk Snow Coulee watershed; on to the Snow Coulee; on to the Middle Fk Porcupine Ck; on to the Porcupine Ck; on to the Milk R (10th hit); on to the Missouri.

Here’s my landing map, where, as you can see, I landed near a bunch of little towns: Opheim, Glentana, Richland, Peerless and Larslan.   (FYI, I landed near Peerless in July 08, and it just happened to be a day when you were over at my house, witnessing the landing . . .)

landing33

It looks like Opheim is the largest, so here’s a broader view featuring Opheim (pop 111):

opheim

Here’s a sunrise along the Canada/US border near Opheim (courtesy Lynn Andrews, photo.net):

sunrise-at-opheim

From a collection of grain elevator photos comes this wonderful picture of grain elevators near Glentana:

glentana_mt_d05102621

Here’s a picture of Opheim, heading into town on Route 24:

entering-opheim-on-rt-241

Here’s a picture of the Opheim railroad depot:

opheim-depot

Just south of Opheim is an unusual business (unusual for a Jersey guy like me):

granruds_indexart_05

granruds_indexart_06

Welcome to Granrud’s Lefse Shack
Proud makers of delicious home-made style,

Norwegian potato lefse since 1977.
Located in Northeast Montana just outside of Opheim.
We have proudly been making lefse for 31 years.

When tradition demands the best.

From Wiki:

Lefse is a traditional soft Norvegian flatbread. Tjukklefse or tykklefse (thick lefse) is thicker, and often served with coffee as a cake.
Lefse is made out of potato, milk or cream (or sometimes lard) and flour, and cooked on a griddle. Special tools are available for lefse baking, including long wooden turning sticks and special rolling pins with deep grooves. There are significant regional variations in Norway in the way lefse is made and eaten, but it generally resembles a flatbread, although in many parts of Norway, especially Valdres, it is far thinner.

800px-rakfisk

A lefse topped with rakfisk served with potatoes, onion and sour cream.

Back to the Granrud’s Lefse Shack website:
If you happen to be driving about one mile south of Opheim, Montana, you’ll find Granrud’s Lefse Shack. People come from all over to tour our unique operation and sample our lefse hot off the grill. Our season starts up in the fall and runs into April. Come by some time to watch and taste.

Good potatoes are the most important ingredient for making fine lefse. A blend of red and white potatoes (about 1000 pounds a day) are brought in from the potato bin. Dry land potatoes are used for a special reason. The Lefse Shack uses about 84,000 pounds of potatoes every season.

After the potatoes are cooked, they are put into a giant mixer with the other ingredients and beaten until smooth and silky. These are by far the best tasting mashed potatoes one can ever taste! The potatoes are then scooped into six quart buckets which are set on racks to cool down a bit before refrigerating.

The potatoes are now cooled down and ready to be made into lefse. So into another mixer they go with some flour. They are mixed up, then stuffed into the tubes. It takes just the right amount of flour and mixing time for this station. The dough can get too sticky or dry if not mixed right. From the tubes, the dough is spread on the griddle for cooking!

You can go to Granrud’s website and actually order your own lefse!  (Click HERE.)  I think maybe I’ll give it a shot and report back . . .

KS

Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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Galt, Missouri

Posted by graywacke on March 29, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – I’m pinching myself to see if this is real. Six, count ‘em six, USers in a row . . . MO; 38/39; 8/10; 23; 162.0. Here’s my updated SCORE graph:

score2

That’s four new low Scores in a row. The last time that happened was in the summer of ’07.

Here’s my landing map, which shows that I landed near Galt (and not too far from Trenton):

landing32

Anyway, I landed in the No Creek watershed. No Kidding. No Creek! What a strange name; sort of like there’s a watershed with no creek in it. But of course, there is a creek: No Creek. Who’s on first?

I can imagine a little settlement on the banks of the creek, named, of course, No. Hmmmm, we’re in Missouri, so the town would be No MO.

Anyway, the No flows to the Honey Ck; on to the Thompson R (3rd hit); on to the Grand (5th hit, making the Grand the 130th river with 5 or more hits); on to the Missouri.

Here’s a broader view, featuring Galt (pop 275):

galt1

I’ve gotten a little behind with ALAD, so, with my apologies to those of you who prefer a more robust investigation into local lore and history, I’m going to share with you the only item I could find about Galt, which is a picture of a bus token:

bus-token-from-galt

It’s hard to imagine a town as tiny as Galt having it’s own bus line and token.

I’ll close with a bit of a stretch.  There was an artist by the name of Charles Franklin Galt, and in 1920, he painted a piece entitled “Winter in Missouri.”  Ergo, it came up on my Google image search.  Anyway, here ’tis:

pictureaspx
KS

Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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Arenzville, Illinois

Posted by graywacke on March 28, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – Wow. Let the good times roll! Five, count ‘em five, USers in a row. And, for the third landing in a row, of course, a new record low SCORE. The latest is . . . IL; 30/31; 7/10; 22; 162.6.  As long as I’m setting records, I’m going to show you the graph:

score1

I landed in the Prairie Ck watershed, on to the Indian Ck, on to the Illinois R (15th hit); on to the MM.  This marks the 8th watershed with “Prairie” in the stream name (not counting any duplicates). This makes Prairie the 49th stream name that has 8 or more unique streams with that name. (Eight is my lower limit to make the list of “Common Stream Names.”) For the 19th time, I landed in a watershed with the stream name of Indian (not counting any duplicates).

Here’s my landing map:

landing31

As you can see, I landed near Beardsville (largest town, pop 5800); Virginia, pop 1700; and Arenzville, pop 400.

Here’s a broader view, featuring the closest of the three towns, Arenzville:

arenzville

Here’s a picture of Arenzville back in the day (when I suspect it had more than 400 people):

arenz3

Here’s a fairly recent aerial photo of Beardstown, showing the Illinois River:

aerialbtown

I found some wonderful pictures of the Green family from Arenzville. Here they are:

Here are the parents:

williamtheresagreen-arenzville

William Jackson Green and Theresa Cire Green
Arenzville, Cass County, Illinois

Here are the daughters:

greensisters

Front Row: Florence Edith Green Kloker and Alice Katherine Green Hamm
Back Row: Dora Emelia Green Hamm, Lillian Adelaide Green Wood and Annie Green

I assume that Annie got married at some point. but who knows?  And here’s a family shot:

green-family-arenzville

Family of William and Theresa Cire Green of Arenzville, Cass County, Illinois
Front row: William Jackson Green and Theresa Katherine Cire Green
Back row from left to right: Dora Emelia Green Hamm, Alice Katherine Green Hamm, Richard “Dick” Green,
Florence Edith Green Kloker, Edgar Green, Lillian Adelaide Green Wood, Annie Green and Charles William Green.

Annie’s not married for this picture, either.  Anyway, I get the feeling that William Sr. was quite the character.

KS

Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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Tecopa, California

Posted by graywacke on March 27, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – Well, the records keep on a-falling . . . CA; 79/90; 6/10; 21; 163.2.  What with two record lows in a row, I think it’s time to show you a graph of my SCORE.  Note that I marked when ALAD was launched. We’ll see if this latest breakthrough has legs. Anyway, here’s the graph:

score

I landed in the Amargosa River watershed (3rd hit).  The Amargosa meanders into Death Valley, where it (I guess appropriately) dies.  Here’s a picture of the watershed.  Tecopa is on the northward-flowing leg, not far south of Death Valley.

amagosa_river

Here’s a picture of the mighty Amargosa at Tecopa:

800px-amargosa_river_at_tecopa_1


Anyway, I landed less than 4 miles south of my Pahrump NV landing (January 15th), which is amazingly close. Since I’ve already done Pahrump, I’ll do Tecopa, as shown on this landing map (today’s is the southern-most):

landing30

Here’s a broader view:

tecopa

So, Tecopa – from the tecopa.com:

“Tecopa” comes from a Paiute word meaning wildcat. The Tecopa Hot Springs have been a source of healing since time immemorial, used by Shoshone, Paiute, and intertribal travelers and traders.

A large Native community called Yaga was located just east of the springs, at least through the 1930’s. For thousands of years, the area was traversed by a major trading route. With the arrival of the Spanish, this route later became known as the Old Spanish Trail between Santa Fe and Los Angeles.

When mining communities expanded, a treaty agreement was reached with Paiute Pawinavi Tecopa, a renowned negotiator, about shared use of the hot springs, so that everyone could continue to benefit from their healing powers. This agreement specified separate gender bathing, open hours, no pollutants and no charge for use. The agreement has been honored by everyone from the mid-1800s until November 1, 2004, when Inyo County administration sub-leased the springs to a private corporation.

Unfortunately, the BLM now holds that a private corporation charging a fee is still “public use”, and most local residents boycott the current regime.

Here’s a picture of Paiute Tecopa (in the middle):

tecopa2

Here’s a picture of one of the hot springs:

hot-mud2

Here’s a lovely picture (from a website about “layered” photography (www.pbase.com/pnd1/layered_image), with the photographer’s caption below:

tecopa-cemetery

Death Valley’s Black Mountains loom over the lonely cemetery at nearby Tecopa. I structured this landscape as a seven-layer image. The base layer holds the burying ground, with its stark white crosses, a small vase of flowers, and an incongruous empty beer bottle. The cemetery fades into a transitional layer of desert grasses, which in turn gives way to a layer of trees and farmland. The Tecopa wetlands make up the fourth layer, which move us back into the huge valley at the base of the mountains. The mountains lift us up towards the sky in the sixth layer, while the white cloudscape in the final layer echoes the white in the crosses below.

KS

Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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Richfield, Idaho

Posted by graywacke on March 26, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – Oh my! Drum roll please!! It was on a cold and dreary day, December 13th, 2008 that I last set a record low SCORE. On that day, my new record low SCORE was 164.0. Today, March 26th (Greenwich Mean Time), I landed in a USer, which gave me a new record low SCORE. Here are the details:

Today, I landed in . . . ID; 41/46; 5/10; 20; 163.9.  As every true-blue follower of ALAD knows, it is inevitable that my SCORE will decrease through time, and that eventually, after perhaps millions of landings, it will actually approach ZERO.

So, here’s my landing map:

landing29

And, a broader view:

richfield

I landed in the watershed of a new river, the Little Wood, which joins up with the Big Wood to form the Malad (3rd hit); on to the Snake (62nd hit).

From the town’s website:

Though small in area and population, what Richfield lacks in size and wealth is more than made up for in heart and history.

Alberta was the original name chosen for the area but in 1908, the name was changed to Richfield, presumably to entice prominent businessmen and investors.

The city sprang up around several tent towns that appeared along the railroad in the late 1800s. The town was christened in 1907 and the tents were replaced by shacks and wooden buildings. In 1907, the Idaho Irrigation Company held a land opening in Richfield. In less than a week, almost 10,000 acres of farm ground and more than 100 lots in town had been sold.

Due to its location along the railroad route, Richfield quickly became the shipping point for all material to be used in the construction work on the irrigation system and Magic Reservoir. This added to a huge growth in population.

Since that time, the population has fluctuated a great deal and many businesses have come and gone. The area has always been dependent on the agricultural industry and has either prospered or suffered depending on agricultural economy.

Today the City of Richfield has a population of 420 and at least that many live in the surrounding areas. The oldest business in Richfield is Pipers Grocery Store. It was established in 1939 by Joe and Helen Piper and is still thriving today and is owned by Grandson Mike Piper.

All Richfield residents, both past and present, have been and continue to be, fiercely loyal to the little town. Many who have moved out of the area return annually to visit old friends and reminisce. They can be overheard saying that the best years of their lives were spent in Richfield. Once dubbed the Biggest little town in Idaho, Richfield remains big in the hearts of all who have passed through.

Usually, I kind of suffer through the small town website self-glorification. But somehow, Richfield rings true.

Richfield has annual chariot races.  Here’s a picture:

chariot3

And, Richfield has at least one wonderful old barn:

barn-richfield

KS

Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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Van Horn, Texas

Posted by graywacke on March 25, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – How sweet it is, when the LG decides that today is one of those Lone Star kind of days . . . TX; 116/148; 5/10; 19; 164.5.  Here’s my landing map:

landing28

And a broader view.

van-horn

For the second time, I landed in the Wild Horse Ck watershed. The Wild Horse just kind of peters out in the West Texas desert, going nowhere that I can see (i.e., an “Internal” watershed landing).

So, you can see from my landing map that I landed near Van Horn. Something jumped out at me right away about Van Horn. From Wiki:

On Friday, November 10, 2006, the Wall Street Journal reported that Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of amazon.com, had acquired 290,000 acres of land 25 miles north of Van Horn to house his fledgling space tourism company, Blue Origin.  Blue Origin is expected to start commercial operations as early as 2010, aiming for 52 launches per year from the Van Horn, Texas facility.

From the Blue Origin website, here’s a picture of the prototype vehicle (this isn’t just a nose cone, it’s the whole thing):

pic1

If you go to the website you can a see a couple of videos of an actual test launch.

http://public.blueorigin.com/letter.htm

It’s actually pretty cool.

From the Van Horn town website comes this picture:

body1

From Lone Star Internet:

Van Horn grew from a wayfaring stop on the historic Bankhead Highway and Old Spanish Trail from San Antonio to California in the mid 1800’s. Still a primary road junction of I-10 (U.S. 80), U.S. 90 and Texas 54.

John Madden, colorful television football broadcaster, designated Chuy’s Restaurant for his “Haul of Fame”. Madden frequently crisscrosses the country in his bus to broadcast games and stops at Chuy’s in Van Horn two or three times a year. Just before Super bowl Weekend, he annually names his “All-Madden Team”. Plaques and photos of inductees hang in the Chuy’s restaurant at 1200 West Business Loop 10.

Here’s an enthusiastic TripAdvistor review of Chuy’s in Van Horn:

I live in Phoenix, where there are more Mexican restaurants than there are McDonalds! I know of a lot of good places, but nowhere have I eaten better green chile chicken enchiladas than at Chuys! They were just the right amount of spicy, and the sauce was delicious!  They brought my beer with a frozen mug, not chilled, frozen!  Beer Slushie!  It was the perfect end to a long hard drive!

chuys

chuys1

What the heck, here’s a picture of good ol’ John:

john-madden-thumb

KS
Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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Dayton, Washington

Posted by graywacke on March 24, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – Well, I landed in the “State of Snake” today. Odds are, I landed in ID, right? But we all know that odds are funny things, because I landed in . . . WA; 39/39; 5/10; 18; 165.1.

Two new rivers, the Little Tucannon, which flows to the Tucannon, which, of course, flows to the Snake (61st hit); on to the Columbia.

Here’s my landing map:

landing27

And a broader view:

dayton

First, a little landing business. Remember a while back when I changed my thinking about 4/10 USers being good? Well, I’m now to the point where I have to move the whole concept up to 5/10. If I average 4/10, my Score no longer goes down. (If you read “About Landing,” it says that 4/10 is a positive USer rate that will result in a lower Score.)

This all has to do with the ratio between the OSers and the USers. For years, that ratio was about 4/10 for USers. As long as that was the case, my Score moved down more for USers than it moved up for OSers. But now, the ratio is about 50/50 (notice all of those former WBers?), and the score moves up and down about equally.

If you don’t have a clue what that’s all about, don’t worry.

Back to my landing. As you can see, I landed near Dayton. From the town’s website:

Rich in history, this area was originally explored by Lewis and Clark who camped on the Patit Creek just east of Dayton on their return in 1806. At that time Dayton’s Main Street was a racetrack for regional Indian Tribes. The first settlers in 1859 and by 1872 the town had been platted, named, and the post office was established.

Between 1880 and 1910, prosperous businessmen (including Jacob Weinhard who founded a brewery) and farmers built themselves large impressive homes, commercial, and public buildings. Today 90 of these are on the National Register of Historic Places and include two districts.

Dayton boasts the oldest train depot in the state (1881) and the oldest working county courthouse (1887). Both have been lovingly restored to their original splendor. Natural wonders such as Palouse falls and the Blue Mountains are within an easy drive.

Here’s a picture of the above-mentioned Palouse Falls (with the caption below):

palouse-falls

Out in the middle of what some people consider “nowhere” is Palouse Falls. The Palouse River wanders among wheat fields, cattle ranches and dry canyons until it suddenly takes this plunge over basalt cliffs.
Here are pictures of the train depot and the courthouse (with captions below):

dayton-depot

The Dayton Train Depot was built in 1881 and is the oldest surviving passenger train station in the state. The Depot has been beautifully restored and is now a museum.

courthouse

Columbia County Courthouse was completed in 1887 in beautiful Italianate architecture at a cost of $38,069.00. This building is the oldest working courthouse in the state.

Here’s kind of an interesting photo (caption below):

jolly-green-giant

I saw this on a steep embankment west of Dayton, Washington. Dayton’s major employer is the Seneca Foods asparagus cannery. Seneca Foods is part of the Green Giant Foods company and the Jolly Green Giant is its logo. So, they constructed a 300-foot high Jolly Green Giant on a steep embankment west of town which was too steep to be farmed, even by Dayton area farmers who are known for some of the most vertically farmed land in the country.

So, The Tucannon River. Here’s a picture of the Tucannon River at it’s mouth – That’s the Tucannon flowing in to the Snake from the top of the picture:

tucannon_river_at_mouth_coe

Surprise, surprise . . . Lewis and Clark were here. From their journal entry of May 3, 1806:

We set out at an early hour, and crossed the high plains, which we found more fertile and less sandy than below; yet, though the grass is taller, there are very few aromatic shrubs. After pursuing a course N. 25° E. for twelve miles, we reached the Kinnooenim [Tucannon River]. This creek rises in the southwest mountains [Blue Mountains], and though only twelve yards wide, discharges a considerable body of water into Lewis’s river [Snake River], a few miles above the narrows. Its bed is pebbled, its banks low, and the hills near its sides high and rugged; but in its narrow bottoms are found some cottonwood and willow.
I never realized that the Snake was called “Lewis’s River.” I thought that Meriwhether did most of the writing, but evidently Mr. Clark wrote the above.

Here’s another view of the mouth of the Tucannon:

confluence

And a nice view of the Tucannon River Valley itself:

tucannon-valley

KS
Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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McCook, Nebraska

Posted by graywacke on March 23, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – Unable to break out, I might as well hit an old-fashioned WBer . . . NE; 51/43; 5/10; 17; 165.8.  For the 18th time, I landed in the Republican River watershed, on to the Kansas (52nd hit); on to the Missouri.

Here’s my landing map:

landing26

As you see, I landed between the larger town of McCook (pop 8,000), and the smaller town of Culbertson (pop 600).
Here’s a broader view:

mccook

Keeping a not-so-wonderful string alive, I’m once again having trouble finding anything of particular interest about my landing site.  Once again, I’m sure that McCook and Culbertson and great towns; once again, I’m having trouble find my hook.


Note from the landing map how close I landed to the Republican River. Let me check it out. I’ll start with a pretty NE Republican River picture:

republican-river

Here’s something that Wiki says about the Republican:
The river was named after a branch of Pawnee Indians known as “the Republicans.”

Wait a second!!! Pawnee Indians known as the Republicans!!! You’ve got to be kidding me!!!
I just checked a second reference, and they said basically the same thing!  Anyway, here’s a cool aerial shot of a barn in Culbertson . . .

barn-culbertson-101802-a004_2

KS


Greg

© 2009 A Landing A Day

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Monticello, Arkansas

Posted by graywacke on March 22, 2009

First timer? In this once-a-day blog, I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48). I call this “landing.” I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near. I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location. To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is and what the various numbers and abbreviations mean), please see “About Landing,” above.

Dan – Well, for months and months, my Score seems to be revolving around 165/166. So, yesterday, I was 165.9, so today I go a little lower with this USer . . . AR; 23/29; 6/10; 165.2. For the 2nd time, I landed in the Bayou Bartholomew watershed, on to the Ouachita (8th hit); on to the Black 9 (also 8th hit); on to the Red (39th hit); on to the Atchafalaya (your favorite river, with its 45th hit).

I landed near Monticello. Here’s my landing map:

landing20

Here’s a broader view:

monticello

All right. Monticello is GD. There’s a U of Arkansas branch there, but I can’t find anything of interest to the general ALAD readership.  Anybody from Monticello or environs out there who can clue me in to something interesting about your town or area? Please do . . .

OK, so here’s the local website says:

Nestled in the rolling hills of Southeast Arkansas, you’ll find Monticello, the region’s fastest growing city. Here you will discover educational opportunities, hunting in thousands of acres of pine and hardwood forests, fishing and recreational boating in Lake Monticello, and fun for the family during the annual Rough and Ready Days Festival each spring. You may just want to take a leisurely stroll down Main Street and view the pride of our past in the National Historical District, or tour the Drew County Museum. We are proud of our quality school systems, exceptional health care, active youth programs, diversified and expanding industry and a growing retail economy. We are Monticello!

You know what? I have no doubt that Monticello is a wonderful town and a wonderful place to live!!!  But, I need an angle!! A hook!!!  Something of general interest!!!

Well, here’s a beautiful picture of sisters at sunset in front of Monticello Lake. The caption is below the photo:

sisters-at-sunset

Today’s awesome photograph comes to us from Arkansas photographer, Matt Terry, of Terry’s Photography. In the photographer’s own words:  “I took this picture at Lake Monticello in Monticello, AR. This was captured at sunset on Sunday, October 1, 2006. The sky was unbelievable and I used a Canon 20D with a 50mm lens to shoot this scene. There was an off camera Canon 580 flash mounted on a tripod and diffused with an umbrella triggered by the Canon st-e2. You can see more of my work at http://www.terrysphotography.biz.”
This comes from a WordPress blog with many cool photos. Click here.  Anyway, that’ll do it . . .

KS


Greg

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