A Landing a Day

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Scranton, Pennsylvania

Posted by graywacke on May 3, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2264; A Landing A Day blog post number 694.

Dan:  After three OSers, I hit a state with zero landings since I changed my random lat/long procedure.  I go way back with Pennsylvania – my family roots are in Belvidere NJ (just across the Delaware River from PA); I went to college in PA (Lafayette in Easton); my summer jobs while in college were in the Poconos and my first real job was in Bethlehem.  I currently live in Jersey pretty close to the Delaware, so forays into PA are common.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of Gardner Creek; on to the beautiful Susquehanna (22nd hit):

landing 3

The Susquehanna (of course), discharges into the Chesapeake Bay.

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) space flight in to NE Pennsylvania.  Click HERE, enjoy the flight and hit your back button.

The yellow landing push pins are for all of my landings since January 2013.  See that there are only two in Pennsylvania?  And see how close they are?

The nearby landing is my April 4, 2015 Nanticoke landing.  What a great post!  When I’ve said that in the past, I might have been exaggerating a little, but not this time!  It has a fair dose of geology, covering water gaps and anthracite coal; but it also features an other-wordly abandoned all-concrete town.  Check it out – you’ll enjoy it, and it’ll give you some good background for today’s post.

I have good GE SV coverage:

ge sv landing map

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

I was able to get a SV look of Gardner Creek, just before it discharges into the Susquehanna:

ge sv creek map

And here’s the view:

ge sv creek

I found this GE SV shot of the Susquehanna some miles south of my landing (in Pittstown):

ge sv river

I headed over to GE Panoramio to get this view of the Susquehanna, taken much closer (just west) of my landing by Tom Lutkowski:

pano Tom Lutkowski

So, of course I researched Scranton, looking for a hook (beyond the anthracite coal mining, already featured in my Nanticoke post).  But nothing really jumped out at me.  OK, so according to Wiki some pretty famous people have a Scranton connection:  Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton (the Rodham’s are from Scranton, and she lived nearby for some time as a kid), B.F. Skinner (the famous psychologist) and one of the Woolworth brothers (co-founder of Woolworth’s). 

But I’m burned out on politics, and I’ve never been one for esoteric psychology, and don’t really care about Woolworths.  But what caught my eye (as I was reading about the anthracite coal mining history of the region, was this (from Wiki):

The Knox Mine Disaster of January 1959 virtually shut down the mining industry in Northeastern Pennsylvania, and it never recovered. The event eliminated thousands of jobs as the waters of the Susquehanna River flooded the mines.

Oh my.  The river broke in to an underground mine?  Sounds terrible . . .

As a geologist, I like cross sections, so I’ll start with one (from the Mine Safety & Health Administration):

mine safety and health administration x section

They were mining the Pittston Bed, going from right to left (east to west) on the cross section (the black portion of the bed was never mined).  As you can see, the bed sloped up towards the river.  It actually caved in just east of the river bank, but obviously enough soil caved in that the river came rushing in.

Here’s what it looked like (courtesy the Pittston Progress):

pittstown progress 1

The built a new rail siding so that rail cars could be run into the hole (with the hopes of plugging it):

pittstown progress 2

pittstown progress 3

This effort was to no avail. 

I found a video (from JP Videos) that you simply MUST WATCH:

 

From Wiki:

Eventually, an estimated 10 billion gallons of water filled the mines. Ten people were indicted in the disaster’s aftermath, including the mine superintendent, Robert Dougherty, owner Louis Fabrizio, secret owner August J. Lippi who was also the president of District 1 of the United Mine Workers, and three union officials. These six served jail time.

I was only 8 when this happened, so I have no memory of it.  But it’s possible that I was watching the Huntley Brinkley Report with my parents, when this news story was covered . . .

Time for some GE Panoramio shots.  I’ll start with this, of Falling Springs Reservoir a couple of miles south of my landing, by AcidAlias:

pano bradnowell

And just downstream from Falling Springs Reservoir is the Falling Springs Waterfall, by PaWaterfalls:

pano PaWaterfalls

I’ll close with shot of the top of the mountain just northeast of my landing, by Brad Nowell:

pano acidalias

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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Colorado City, Arizona

Posted by graywacke on April 29, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2263; A Landing A Day blog post number 693.

Dan:  This landing in AZ marks  my third OSer in a row (and my third landing in AZ since changing my random lat/long procedure).  As always, an OSer pushes my Score higher (in this case, from 886 to 891).  No clue what I’m talking about?  Check out the tab “About Landing (Revisited).

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

I’ll be using Google Earth (GE) to track my drainage, so it’s time for my GE spaceflight in to to NW Arizona.  Click HERE, fasten your seat belts, and enjoy the trip (and then click your back button).

My drainage pathway was pretty obvious on GE:

ge ft pierce wash

I knew the drainage way was called the Fort Pierce Wash thanks to this Street Atlas map:

landing 3a

This was my 3rd hit for the Fort Pierce Wash; on to the Virgin R (12th hit).

As you can see below, the Virgin makes its way to the Colorado (177th hit) via Lake Meade:

landing 3b

I wanted to check out the Fort Pierce Wash a little, but all I could find was a watershed map from the USEPA.  For reference, the distance from St. George to Springdale is about 30 miles, so it looks like the watershed is about 35 miles x 50 miles, or 1,750 square miles:

us epa ft pierce watershed map

The nearest GE Street View shot of the wash is way the heck up in Utah near St. George.  Here’s ‘tis:

ge sv ft pierce

While perusing GE, I noticed a very interesting portion of the Wash (in the upper left portion of the GE drainage shot from the beginning of this post).  Here it is, with the location of a Panoramio photo highlighted:

ge ft pierce 2

And here’s the photo, by Acroskey:

pano acroskrey

As dry as it is now, it’s hard to imagine all of the stream flow needed to carve the canyon.  Most of the erosion probably happened during the much wetter most recent glacial epoch . . . 

Fort Pierce itself is in Utah, about a half hour outside of St. George.  Here’s a little history from SouthwestBackCountry.wordpress.com:

Fort Pierce is a fort that saw no action. It was constructed in 1866 to protect livestock and to protect the springs located just below the fort. The rock walls were originally 8 feet high. There was no top on the fort and 16 port holes in the wall gave the inhabitants a good crossfire in all directions should the fort be attacked by Indians, which it never was.

And a pic:

l_6bb78f07248f412e9ad43289a95cde67

Moving right along.  The only town in the vicinity of my landing (see my local landing map above) is Colorado City (pop 4,800).  Cane Beds hardly exists.  I opened up Wiki and was immediately intrigued:

Colorado City, formerly known as Short Creek (still sometimes called “The Creek,” was founded in 1913 by members of the Council of Friends, a breakaway group from the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church, aka the Mormons). The Council of Friends membership desired a remote location where they could practice plural marriage (polygamy), which had been publicly abandoned by the LDS Church in 1890.

The article then goes on to talk about Warren Jeffs and the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Chris of Latter Day Saints (FDLS), which is the leading branch of Mormon-based polygamy.  Warren (who’s in jail for the rest of his life after being convicted of two felony counts of child sexual assault) remains the Prophet of the FLDS Church.  Evidently, the FLDS Church has a membership of 7,000 – 10,000, quite a few of whom live in the Colorado City / Hildale area (Hildale is just across the state border in Utah).  Many others are in Eldorado TX, the site of an FLDS temple.

Back to Wiki for this tidbit:

The Colorado City/Hildale area has the world’s highest incidence of fumarase deficiency, an extremely rare genetic condition which causes severe intellectual disability. Geneticists attribute this to the prevalence of cousin marriage between descendants of two of the town’s founders, Joseph Smith Jessop and John Y. Barlow.  At least half the double community’s roughly 8,000 inhabitants are descended from one or both.

Phew.  I dutifully Googled FLDS Church History and spent a lot of perusal time, including watching an entire ABC News 20/20 report on the FLDS.  Pretty compelling stuff.  Click HERE if you want to watch it (there are some parts not suitable for all audiences). 

Enough!  Time for some GE Panoramio shots.  I’ll start with this one, entitled “Hell’s Rainbow,” shot in (of all places) Colorado City (by Joe Pledger):

pano joe Pledger sunset hell's rainbow

I’ll close with this great photo (the most positive part of this entire post), taken just three miles of my landing by John Gillett:

pano john gillett 3 mi s sundog

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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Blanca, Blanca Peak and the Great Sand Dunes, Colorado

Posted by graywacke on April 25, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2262; A Landing A Day blog post number 692.

Dan:  This is my 3rd landing in Colorado since I changed my random lat/long procedure.  No surprise, CO is an OSer, and my Score went up from 881 to 886.

Not a clue what I’m talking about?  Check out the tab “About Landing (Revisited).”

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

As you’ll see when we get to Google Earth (GE), there are no discernible streams close to my landing.  But I’m sure that I landed in the watershed of the Rio Grande (46th hit):

landing 3

Of course, the Rio Grande becomes the border between Tex & Mex on its way to the G of M.

It’s time for my GE spaceflight in to S-Cen Colorado.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip and then hit your back button.

Here’s a GE shot showing the two geological features that I’ll be writing about (and more importantly, showing pictures of):

ge 1

I maneuvered GE into a low angle position, looking east past my landing towards Blanca Peak:

ge 2

And then I reversed things, looking past Blanca Peak towards my landing:

ge 3

Pretty dramatic eh?

Here’s my GE Street View (SV) coverage:

ge sv landing map

And here’s what the orange dude sees.

ge sv landing

I had to go way south to find SV coverage of the Rio Grande:

ge rio sv map

And here’s the view (looking downstream):

ge rio sv

Before talking about mountains and sand dunes, I’ll hit the town of Blanca.  Sorry Fort Garland (named after a 19th century Indian-fighting outpost), but I found your town hookless.

I’ll start with this great shot of Main Street, Blanca, in 1910 (from the town website):

blanca 1910

I positioned GE SV in about the same position on Main Street.  The large building visible in 1910 is still there in the current shot (it’s the first building on the right, mostly hidden by the trees):

blanca same view today

Wiki has a bizarre entry under “History.”  Here it is, in its entirety:

The town, named for Blanca Peak, was founded in August 1908 from a land lottery in the San Luis Valley of south central Colorado. It was incorporated in 1909.

In the mid-1990s Polish settlers set up shop at the Red Rocks General Store selling liquor, beer, polish sausages, and other eastern European goods. Blanca is the region’s main supplier of bilberry syrup.  Blanca is known for elk hunting and alpine trout fishing.

I don’t know what to think about the mention of the mid 1990s Polish settlers. . .

Moving on to Blanca Peak.  Geologically, it’s a huge hunk of granite that’s part of the Sangre de Cristo Range, and tops off at elevation 14,351 feet. 

Here’s a little factoid from Wiki:

Blanca Peak is higher than any point in the United States east of its longitude.

I won’t argue with that. Time for some GE Panoramio shots of the mountain.  I’ll start with this, by Charles Baxter:

pano blanca charles baxter

By IGHook:

pano blanca ighook

By Pat Plampin:

pano blanca pat plampin

And finally, by ArdenZ:

pano blanca ardenz

Time to move a little north and check out Great Sand Dunes National Park.

I’ll start with a short video I found on the town website of nearby Alamosa (located about 20 miles west of Blanca):

 

Enough background?  I think so.  Time for some Pano shots.  I’ll start with this, by Kathaneni:

pano dunes kethaneni2

Kathaneni got a little closer:

pano dunes kethaneni

Here’s the stream that runs along the base of the dunes (talked about in the video; the one you have to cross after you park your car), by rblekicki:

pano dunes rblekicki

And here’s a close-up of the eroding edge of the stream (by Wild Panoramic):

pano dunes wild panoramic

Sand and mountains, take 1 (by Peter Connolly):

pano dunes peter connolly

And I’ll close with sand and mountains, take 2 (by koikecolousa:

pano dunes koikecolousa

Spectacular area, spectacular photography.

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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Mountain, North Dakota

Posted by graywacke on April 19, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2261; A Landing A Day blog post number 691.

Dan:  Like Colorado and California (my last two landings), this was my second hit since I changed my random lat/long procedure (44 landings ago).  But unlike Colorado & California, 2 hits pushes ND into OSer territory (it’s about the fact that ND is smaller than CO & CA).  Confused?  Probably only you, Dan and Jordan and I really understand).

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map (showing that I am very local to Mountain):

landing 2

As you can see in the above map, I landed right next to Cart Creek (and obviously in the Cart Creek watershed).  My StreetAtlas map doesn’t show the actual path of Cart Creek, so I had to go to Google Earth (GE).  It showed that Cart Creek heads southeast.  Here’s a StreetView map with the approximate course of Cart Creek drawn in by yours truly:

landing 3

As you can see, Cart Creek discharges into the North Branch of the Park River (1st hit ever!); on to the Middle Branch of the Park River (1st hit ever!); on to the Park River (1st hit ever!); on to the Red River of the North (47th hit).

As you recall from only 8 landings ago (when I last landed in ND and also in the Red River watershed), the Red flows on to the Nelson R (65th hit), and eventually to Hudson Bay.

Time for my GE space flight in to NE ND. Click HERE, enjoy the trip, then hit your back button.

Here’s a GE shot showing SV coverage:

ge sv landing map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

Cart Creek crosses the north-south road through Mountain just east of my landing, but there’s really nothing to see (maybe there’s a long culvert, the ends of which cannot be seen from the road).  The Creek doesn’t come into its own until about 10 miles downstream:

ge sv cart ck map

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv cart ck

Let me go back to my extremely-local landing map:

landing 2

For a teeny town, there are some interesting street name phenomena here.  For example, one might live on the corner of Main & Main (Street & Avenue, of course), or the corner of 2nd & 3rd.  And by the way, while there’s a 2nd Avenue, there’s no 1st or 3rd Avenues (verified by Google Maps).

And I see a Hill Street.  Maybe someone felt a little sheepish about naming the town “Mountain,” when there’s no such thing anywhere in Northeast ND!

Let’s see what Wiki has to say about Mountain:

The community was the destination of many Icelandic immigrants who began arriving about 1878.  Mountain was laid out in 1884.  The city was named on account of its lofty elevation.  A post office called Mountain has been in operation since 1881.

OK, I guess I need to look and see if there’s a “mountain” (or any other lofty elevation) anywhere close to Mountain.  I’ll cruise around the vicinity using GE and their elevation tool. 

Well, here are some elevations I marked on the map:

ge elev

It’s pretty obvious – the land slopes up from east to west, with the slopes getting much steeper west of town (near the county line).

So, it looks like the steeper slopes are wooded. I’ll zoom back and take a broader look:

ge woods

 

By using the GE elevation tool, I could see that the steepest slopes are consistently along the north-south strip of woods, which makes sense, since back in the day, the steep slopes weren’t good for farming (and didn’t get cleared).

So, I’m a geologist, and I’m sure that something must be going on that some geologist or other has figured out.  So, after a bit of an internet search, I found a USGS geologic map of Cavalier County – the county just west of Mountain.  Here’s a portion of the geologic map:

geo 2

The dark-colored geologic unit (which seems like it lines up with the woods/steeper slopes) is Unit 5.  Here’s what the key on the map says about Unit 5:

geo 1

I’ll go back to GE.  I made the GE shot below line up with the geologic map from above.  Use the jog in the county line as a point of comparison:

ge geo

I love it.  Want to know why there’s a north-south slope west of town?  Ask a geologist.  I’m sure the guy who made the geologic map can tell the whole geologic story – like why there’s a geologic unit that trends north-south, and why it has caused the steep slope.

Here’s a low angle oblique GE shot looking west past Mountain and past my landing.  Don’t see much in the way of mountains, eh?  You can just see the woods (and the slope) near the county line in the far distance.

ge 3

Here’s another low-angle oblique GE shot looking west much closer to the slope:

ge 2

There’s the slope!  Anyway, here’s my bottom line:  There is no reason for Mountain to be called Mountain!!  I might call it “Foot of Steep Wooded Slope, North Dakota.”

As I speculated earlier, I think that Hill Street was named by someone who felt embarrassed that the town was named Mountain, when all there is is a gentle hillside about 3 miles west of town . . .

OK, back to Wiki:

Geir Haarde, a former prime minister of Iceland, attended the Annual 2 August Celebration in 2007.

There’s an annual 2 August Celebration?  Here’s a 2007 article from the NDTourism.com:

Huge Icelandic festival this weekend in NE North Dakota

By: Heather Lemoine

This weekend is the 112th annual Deuce of August Icelandic celebration in Mountain, North Dakota.  If you aren’t familiar with Mountain, it’s a town of 130 people that more than quadruples in size with this celebration of Icelandic heritage and culture.

So why the 2nd of August?  Here are some excerpts from August2nd.com:

In 1874, Iceland had been under harsh Danish rule for hundreds of years and the people wanted their freedom. A man named Jon Sigurdsson was determined to get it for them.

Sigurdson became a member (and then president) of the Parliament in Iceland. He hammered away at the Danish government until finally, in January 1874, King Kristjan the Ninth of Denmark made the announcement that he would visit Iceland during the summer of 1874, and that he would bring a new constitution for Iceland. He decreed that the Icelandic Parliament should be called into session from August the first to the seventh.

On August the Second, he asked the Icelandic clergy to have services in every church in the land. On that day, he would hand over the New Constitution to Parliament.  Sigurdson advised the leaders to accept the constitution because it was a step in the right direction, even though it was inadequate. But he cautioned the people never to lose their desire for independence. His rallying cry was “Aldrei ad vikja” (Never let down).

A small group of Icelandic people who immigrated to Milwaukee, Wisconsin in the early 1870s held a celebration on August 2, 1874, to celebrate this event. The Icelandic community of Winnipeg held a celebration on the second of August in the year 1890 and called it, “The Day of the Icelanders.” While August the second was never declared a legal national holiday in Iceland, this day has been traditionally celebrated by Canadian and US Icelandic settlers.

Here’s a video about the Manitoba August 2nd Icelandic Celebration (held in Gimli, north of Winnipeg).  OK.  I realize I didn’t land in Manitoba, but how many August 2nd Icelandic Celebration videos are out there?

 

While perusing my landing vicinity for GE Panoramio shots, I came across this, just 3 miles north of my landing (by Dean “Burning7Chrome” Corso):

92461369

He labeled his photo “Cavalier AFS PARCS (Phased Array Radar)”.  A little Google research, and I discovered that this facility (AFS = Air Force Station) is part of our most high-tech missile detection system (and that PARCS actually stands for “Perimeter Acquisition Radar Characterization System.”

Staying with GE Panoramio photos:  I’m generally not big on miscellaneous church shots, but I found three that caught my fancy.  I’ll start with this Icelandic heritage church by TallMikeJensen:

pano tallmikejensen

Here’s another by ColdStart73620:

pano coldstart73620

And finally, this, by Scott Knox.

pano scott knox

I’ll close with yet one more view of my favorite Northeast ND geologic feature (by dixon215, taken north of Mountain, looking west):

pano dixon215

 

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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Julesburg, Colorado

Posted by graywacke on April 14, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2260; A Landing A Day blog post number 690.

Dan:  The next paragraph will be the same as the first paragraph for landing 2259 (my last landing), just changing California to Colorado (and the numbers a little): 

Colorado’s a big state with only one previous hit (since I changed my random lat/long procedure 44 landings ago).  Based on its area, it should have 1.46 hits, so it was clearly undersubscribed prior to today’s landing.  The result?  My Score dropped from 892 to 877 (a new record low). 

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

I had to use the Google Earth (GE) elevation tool to figure out my watershed, so I’ll jump right to my GE spaceflight in to NE Colorado.  Click HERE, enjoy the flight, then hit your back button.

I knew that the South Platte River was close to my landing (unnamed stream north of my landing on my local landing map), and I figured that runoff from my landing spot would head there.  But using the GE elevation tool, I realized that runoff would be heading steadily to the southeast – away from the South Platte.

I had to “travel” this way for about 50 miles before I finally found an entrenched stream:

ge watershed

So, more or less, I landed in the watershed of Frenchman (Frenchman’s? Creek; 3rd hit).  Frenchman Creek makes its way to the Republican River (23rd hit):

 

landing 3

You’ll have to trust me here:  The Republican discharges to the Kansas (61st hit); on to the Missouri (409th hit); and of course, on to the granddaddy of them all, the MM (885th hit).

GE SV coverage wasn’t all that bad, considering the out-in-the-boonies nature of my landing:

ge landing sv map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge landing sv

Of course, I had to go far, far away from my landing to get SV coverage showing Frenchman Creek:

ge frenchmans sv map

And, in spite of a huge watershed, Frenchman Creek ain’t much (as the orange dude sees it):

ge frenchmans sv

Finding my titular town was not easy.  Let me show you (once again) my local landing map:

landing 2

Towns, towns and more towns.  Each one checked out by yours truly, looking for the elusive hook.  The last town I looked at was Julesburg.  Before Julesburg, I was slipping deeper and deeper into despair.  But then, there was Julesburg.

So, Wiki starts out with a standard line, saying how Julesburg was named for a Jules Beni.  OK, so it’s a little unusual for a town to be named after a first name. 

But in Wiki, “Jules Beni” was in blue, so it was clickable.  Here’s the first line of Wiki’s Jules Beni entry:

Jules Beni (died 1861) was a western outlaw who robbed stagecoaches in the Colorado Territory.

Very interesting.  A town named after an outlaw.  But it gets better.  Back to Wiki:

Beni was involved in illegal activities linked to his trading post near Lodgepole Creek, Colorado, which was called by one Eastern journalist the “wickedest city on the plains.” By 1858, the city had grown rapidly with the addition of a stagecoach station, which was eventually named Julesburg by the townspeople in honor of Beni.

However upon Beni’s appointment as manager of the station the stagecoach lines were robbed constantly. As the robbers usually targeted specific stages carrying money and other valuable cargo, Beni soon was suspected of involvement and eventually replaced by gunman Jack Slade.

Jack Slade [working for Central Overland, a stage coach company] was tracking down horse thieves, including Jules Beni [evidently, stage coaches weren’t the only think Jules robbed].  Slade caught up with him at Julesburg, but Beni shot Slade five times. Everybody thought that Slade was dead and several angry townsfolk chased Beni out of Julesburg. When they returned, they found Slade struggling to his feet, having miraculously recovered.

Beni continued to steal horses and Slade vowed to hunt him down. Beni attempted to ambush Slade at Slade’s own ranch at Cold Springs. But Slade found out about the planned ambush and, along with some of his cowboys, captured Beni. Slade did not take Beni to authorities but instead shot him dead while he was tied to a fence post.

Slade himself met a violent end (surprise, surprise).  From Wiki:

Slade’s ferocious reputation, combined with a drinking problem, caused his downfall: He was fired by his employer, stage coach operator Central Overland, for drunkenness in November 1862.  During a drunken spree in Virginia City, Montana, he was lynched by local vigilantes on March 10, 1864, for disturbing the peace.

The wild, wild west, indeed.

Well, it’s time for some GE Panoramio shots.  I’ll start with this, by Porter1, taken about 15 miles S of my landing:

pano porter1 15 mi S

Here’s a scary storm cloud, taken by Cowboy3030 about 9 miles S of my landing:

pano cowboy3030 9 mi S

Here’s a gorgeous shot by QKC, taken about 8 miles NW of my landing:

pano QKC 8 mi SW

I’ll close with this shot of a dirt road, looking north (due north, I suspect) across the South Platte River valley, by ChrisF66:

pano chrisf66 8 mi NW

 

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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Shasta, Whiskeytown and Shasta Lake, California

Posted by graywacke on April 10, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2259; A Landing A Day blog post number 689.

Dan:  California’s a big state with only one previous hit (since I changed my random lat/long procedure 43 landings ago).  Based on its area, it should have 2.3 hits, so it was clearly undersubscribed prior to today’s landing.  The result?  My Score dropped from 933 to 892 (a new record low). 

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2a

The area between Redding and Shasta Lake is pretty developed, and you see that I landed in a neighborhood (Redding is just off the map to the south):

landing 2b

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of Boulder Ck; on to Churn Ck; on to the Sacramento River (22nd hit):

landing 3a

The Sacramento flows due south for about 170 miles before discharging into San Francisco Bay (you can take my word on this).  This was my 33rd landing where runoff ends up under the Golden Gate Bridge.

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to N-Cen California.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, then hit your back button.

The neighborhood where I landed has full GE SV coverage:

ge sv landing map

Here’s a shot of the driveway into which would need to go to visit my landing spot behind the house at 3143 Pinehaven Drive:

ge sv landing

I could find no decent Street View coverage of Boulder Creek.  The area is so urbanized that the creek has probably, for the most part, been relegated to storm sewer status.  I could find Churn Creek some distance away (southeast of Redding).  Here’s what you can see of Churn Creek from Route 44:

ge sv churn map

Redding (pop 90,000) is far and away the largest town in the area; but it ended up being pretty much hookless.

I landed in Shasta County, and found a very good write-up on the history of the county by Dottie Smith (on the Shasta County website).  I’ve taken some excerpts from her write-up (and did a little editing on the last paragraph – I hope Dottie doesn’t mind).  This is a little long, but well worth the read:

When white men began arriving in the early 1800’s, five tribes were living here, each in their own territory. They were the Achomawi, Atsugewi, Okwanuchu, Wintu and the Yana. The first white men seen by Indians were Russians who came from the north moving southward through the Sacramento River Canyon in approximately 1815.

The next white men were Spanish soldiers who traveled here from the southern missions. Then came American, British, and French trappers and explorers traveling into and through this area beginning in the late 1820s in large parties of between 50 and 100 people, which included their wives and children. The Indians’ relationship with the trappers was generally positive.

Disaster was unintentionally brought to the Indians in 1832 by John Work and his party who were unknowingly infected with either malaria or influenza. The Indians contracted the disease which resulted in a catastrophic epidemic that killed hundreds (possibly thousands) of Indians and wiped out entire villages.

Journals of later trappers told of coming upon abandoned villages whose grounds were strewn with bones and skulls. This epidemic was so severe and deadly it greatly reduced their populations and made the Gold Rush and subsequent white settlement easier to accomplish.

In 1848 gold was discovered in the tailrace of John Sutter’s sawmill. And the rest is history.

By 1849 the Gold Rush was in full swing and the ‘yellow fever’ had brought men rushing here from all around the world. Transportation was at first unavailable and nonexistent in this area, so the miners arrived here any way they could. The gold fever grew to such epidemic proportions that officers and crews abandoned their ships in San Francisco Harbor to join in the rush to the northern goldfields. The result left the harbor at San Francisco full of empty, ghostly ships, swaying and creaking to the rhythm of the waves.

Shasta soon became the commercial center of northern California. Prospectors overran the entire area, laws were nonexistent, living conditions were mostly deplorable, and housing consisted of lean-to’s, tents, and a few log cabins. Every nook and cranny was checked for gold – it could be said the miners turned the area inside out and upside down in their mad search for the elusive yellow metal.

And find gold they did, to the tune of millions of dollars worth. However, big troubles were brewing – and the Indian was to be the victim.

The thousands of newly arrived miners had one thing on their minds — find gold. In their mad search to find it, they were quickly polluting the streams that were home to the Indians’ most important food – salmon.  They were also taking over the Indians’ hunting grounds for their food, and they even began taking Indian women for their wives or concubines because there were no white women. Indiscriminate killings of hundreds of Indians began to occur, and, in addition to the killing, their homes, belongings, supplies, and food caches were intentionally destroyed.

The miners and the settlers never relented in the atrocities committed against the Indians. In 1850, the legislature passed the Indenture Act, which made it legal for white men to further exploit Indians who could now be seized and sold, children as well as adults, or held as virtual slaves as vagrants.  If they couldn’t support themselves at the end of their bondage, they could again be arrested for vagrancy and “sold” to work off the bond again. It was a never-ending cycle.

In 1854, the greatest atrocity of all was committed against them. Military reservations were established on the worst lands available (lands that the white people had not homesteaded or settled on) in counties to the south and soldiers and civilians banded together and began capturing every Indian that could be found and forcibly marched and/or transported them to the reservations.

These once-great tribes were forced to live together as prisoners-of-war in an area containing about 5,000 acres and with some who were traditional enemies. The establishment of the military reservations caused the break-up of all the tribes and was the straw that broke their backs. The Indians had been defeated, and the whites were finally victorious.

As the gold fever subsided, agriculture took hold.  In 1862 the Homestead Act was enacted to provide any citizen or first paper alien (except Indians) to claim 160 acres for $10 on the condition he or she lived on the land for five years. Many people took advantage of this opportunity.  Others, when they received title/patent to the property, sold it for a pre-arranged price.  Many of the early large ranches were developed this way. As more and more land was taken up by the homesteaders, the pressure continued to move any remaining Indians to the reservations.

The railroads were built, and when tracks reached the area of what is today Redding in 1872, work stopped – for ten years. The railroad named their temporary end-of-the-line terminal town Redding, for B. B. Redding, a railroad land agent, and began laying out their new town. Redding quickly became the busiest and most important town in Shasta County.

Looking back to the year 1832 (when disease ravaged the Indian tribes) and then ahead to the year 1872 (when the railroad reached Redding) – A PERIOD OF ONLY 40 YEARS –  an almost unbelievable change took place here….a change consisting of the complete takeover and habitation by a new race of white people who established a totally new culture (while eliminating the Indian culture) and nearly eliminated the Indian population by means of disease followed by extreme brutality.

Regular readers know that this isn’t the first time I’ve featured the plight of Indians as they came into contact with white men (and it won’t be the last).  I’m always struck by the incredible injustice of it all.

Anyway, it’s time for a few words about Shasta, Shasta Lake and Whiskeytown. Starting with Whiskeytown:

Whiskeytown was a gold mining town (max pop 1,000).  Given that the town was loaded with gold miners and saloons, I doubt there’s much mystery on the town name origin.  The remains of Whiskeytown (a ghost town) were inundated under Whiskeytown Lake (1960). 

Shasta is a gold mining ghost town (max population a whopping 3,500), a portion of which is preserved as a California State Park.  Here are some GE Panoramio shots of the park – first this by Shain Paiment:

pano shasta shain paiment

And then two in a row by Greg Nyquist:

pano shasta greg nyquist 2

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And here’s a little (a very little) about Shasta Lake from Wiki:

Shasta Lake started out as five small communities, all of which came about with the beginning of construction of Shasta Dam in 1938.  The dam was completed in 1945.

Here’s a Pano shot by LSessions of the dam:

pano lsessions

And here’s a gratuitous shot of Mount Shasta over the lake, by StarGazerHerman:

pano stargazerherman

Mount Shasta is 45 miles away.  Think SGHerman used a telephoto lens?  It’s still a cool picture . . . 

I’ll close with a couple of local GE Panoramio shots (taken less than 3 miles from my landing).  First this, by maddog56 of a small reservoir southwest of my landing:

pano maddog56

I’ll close with this shot on the Sacramento River by Mariem64:

pano mariem64

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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Jackson Center, Ohio

Posted by graywacke on April 6, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2258; A Landing A Day blog post number 688.

Dan:  Drum roll please.  It has been a long, long time, but I finally landed in Ohio.  Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

I’m so excited, I’m going to break with tradition, and jump right to my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to E-Cen Ohio.  Click HERE, enjoy this rare trip to Ohio, then hit your back button.  Pay attention to all of the other landings in Ohio. 

Just kidding. GE shows all of my landings since January 2013 (landing 1977, or 281 landings ago).  Poor ol’ Ohio is 0 for 281.  But how about before landing 1977?  Well, it turns out that my last Ohio landing was number 1809!  That makes 448 landings without landing in Ohio!  (I’m not usually big on exclamation points, but sometimes I can’t help myself!)

And yes, I did some statistics on my pre-1809 Ohio landings.  It turns out that I landed in Ohio 25 times up to and including my 1809 landing.  Divide 1809 by 25, and you’ll find out that I averaged about one Ohio landing per 75 landings!  In fact, Ohio was quite oversubscribed at that point.  Nothing like 448 straight non-Ohio landings to make it undersubscribed!  (Enough “!” already.)

So, of course my Score went down, from 954 to a new record low – 933.  Confused?  Click the above tab “About Landing (Revisited).”

So, finally, it’s time for my local landing map:

landing 2a

Obviously, more about Jackson Center in a bit.  But first, here’s my local streams-only landing map:

landing 3a

You can see that I landed in the watershed of the Little Muchinippi Creek; on to the Muchinippi Ck; on to the Great Miami River (3rd hit).  Muchinippi sounds like someone’s hitting the bottle a little too often . . .

Zooming way back, here’s the story:

landing 3b

You can see that the Great Miami discharges to the Ohio (137th hit); on to the MM (883rd hit).

Here’s a GE map showing Street View (SV) coverage of my landing:

ge landing sv map

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge landing sv

Going a little further afield, here’s a SV map showing where I could get a look at the Muchinippi Creek:

ge stream sv map

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge stream sv

I close the post with a nice shot of the Great Miami River, so you’ll have to wait to get a look . . .

So there must be a hook in Jackson Center, or it wouldn’t be my titular town, right? Right.  Although I’m not particularly fond of corporate hooks, it turns out that Jackson Center is the home of the one and only Airstream trailer factory.  There’s just something about an Airstream that sets it apart and warms the cockles off one’s heart. 

Quick diversion.  Here’s what Wiki has to say about the etymology of the expression I just used:

17th century, unknown, possibly due to resemblance of cockle shells to hearts.  Alternatively, may be corruption of Latin cochleae in the phrase “cochleae cordis” ‎(ventricles of heart). Possibly also inspired by mollusks opening when exposed to warmth, notably cooking.

I’ll start with this GE Street View shot of a line-up of old-time Airstream trailers parked out in front of the factory:

ge airstream

From Wiki:

Airstream is a brand of luxury recreational vehicle manufactured in Jackson Center, Ohio, USA. It is a division of Thor Industries. The company, which now employs more than 475 people, is the oldest in the travel trailer industry (it began in 1931).

Airstream trailers are easily recognized by the distinctive shape of their rounded aluminum bodies. This shape dates back to the 1930s and is based on designs created by Hawley Bowlus, who oversaw construction of Charles Lindbergh’s aircraft, the Spirit of St. Louis.

It has had its ups and downs, but is now a thriving company (especially since being bought by Thor Industries in 1980).

Here are a couple of factoids about Airstream & our space program (from Wiki):

In 1969, upon their return from the Moon, the crewmen of Apollo 11 were quarantined in a modified airtight Airstream trailer until it could be determined that there was little likelihood of their having brought back lunar pathogens with them.

For decades, NASA has used a fleet of Airstream motorhomes to transport astronauts to the launch pad. The space shuttle program used a modified 1983 Airstream Excella beginning in 1984 dubbed the Astrovan.

You ever wondered how military brass fly in a cargo plane?  From Wiki:

Airstream trailers are commonly used to transport American officials around the world. The trailers are strapped down inside military cargo planes. The trailers feature leather seats, air conditioning and climate control, wood panelling, LED televisions, surround sound, and Blu-ray players.

Just for the heck of it, here’s a screen shot of a teeny portion of Google Airstream images:

google images

I’ll close (as promised earlier) with a shot of the Great Miami River.  This was taken by Robert Maihofer II, just below the confluence with the Muchinippi Creek:

pano robert maihofer II

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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Guymon, Hooker and “No Man’s Land,” Oklahoma

Posted by graywacke on April 2, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2257; A Landing A Day blog post number 687.

Dan:  Yet another OSer (and 6 of my last 10 landings have been OSers), as I landed in OK for the third time since changing my random lat/long procedure (41 landings ago).  Check out “About Landing (Revisited)” tab if you care about what I just said but don’t understand.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

I had to use Google Earth (GE) for my watershed analysis, so it’s time for my GE spaceflight into the OK Panhandle.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, then hit your back button.

I managed to land only about two miles from a road with GE Street View coverage:

ge sv landing map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

As for my drainage:  you can tell from the above photo that it’s very flat here on the Oklahoma Panhandle.  Using the GE elevation tool, I was able to ascertain that downhill was generally to the southeast.  After traversing about 9 miles, I came to a low spot that had drainage going in, but no drainage going out.  Here’s a GE shot, with the cluster of pins being the low spot:

ge 1

And of course, here’s a close-up of the low spot:

ge 2

You can see that the elevation of the low spot (according to GE) is 3037.  You can also see that I could go all around the low spot, and everywhere find an elevation of 3045.  So if it rained and rained and rained, the low spot could fill up to an elevation of 3045, making a much bigger lake.

See the north-south line (road?) to the southwest that has a 3045 pin in it?  Just south of that point, the elevations start going down again, so that would be how the lake would drain if it filled much higher than 3045.

So I had a choice.  I could make this an internally-drained watershed, or I could follow the drainage further south (where I’d end up in the Beaver River, which drains into the Optima Lake you can see on my local landing map).

My final decision:  this is an internally-drained watershed, which is the first one for the state of OK! 

Just for the record, here’s my scorecard of internally drained watersheds:

Untitled

And yes, I did have drainage go south of the border (see “MX” above).  This happened when I landed in AZ about 3 miles north of the border, with drainage headed south.

Looking back up at my local landing map, Optima, Hough and Mouser are teeny; nothing to say about them.  I featured Hooker a while back (February 2013).  That post includes an interesting discussion of American state panhandles, an up-close look at a massive feedlot, the town of Hooker, and a huge dam that failed miserably (by failure, I mean it failed to create the lake that the designers/builders expected).  It’s a great post; check it out by typing Hooker in the search box. 

Just for the heck of it, I lifted three Hooker photos from that post.  First this, from TripAdviser.com:

hooker 1

And then this, from RoadsideAmerica.com:

hooker 2

And finally this, from Nevco.com. 

hooker 3

No comment.

So, of course I looked at Guymon.  Even though it’s a way bigger town (pop 11,500), I couldn’t find much of a hook.  I did notice that the town has a museum called “No Man’s Land Museum.”  I’ve run across that term before in reference to the Oklahoma panhandle, but never dug into it.

So here’s the story.  When Texas became part of the United States, the 37th parallel had already been established as the southern boundary of both Kansas and Colorado.  So anything north of that was off-limits for Texas (even though Texas made outrageous territorial claims including parts of NM, CO, KS and WY). 

Texas was going to enter the US as a slave state, and, according to the Missouri Compromise, no lands north of 36’ 30” could be slave.  So that left a 34-mile strip of land between Texas to the south and Colorado and Kansas to the north that, in 1850, was designated the “Public Land Strip.”  The boundary between TX and NM was also set at this time, making the Public Land Strip 170 miles long from east to west.

No one called the strip of land anything other than No Man’s Land.  The land remained No Man’s Land for a remarkable 40 years, until 1890.

In 1890, the Oklahoma Organic Act was passed, which made the panhandle part of the territory of Oklahoma.  “Organic Act?”  Wiki:

An Organic Act is a generic name for a statute used by the United States Congress to describe a territory, in anticipation of being admitted to the Union as a state.

I found a piece from HistoryNet.com entitled Bad Men in No Man’s Land.  Although I only copied some choice excerpts, this is still a little long by ALAD standards.  Obviously, I think it’s worth the read:

The first Anglo occupiers were mostly cattlemen, tough, adventurous types willing to fight anybody for free grass and water. But the cattlemen soon had rivals for this big, empty country. After passage of the Homestead Act in 1862, No Man’s Land was surveyed and laid off into townships: The boundaries were marked with little domes of zinc, called ‘pot lines.’ Kansas newspapers published rhapsodic stories of new towns and free land; the embryonic town of Beaver [about 50 miles east of Guymon] would be called the ‘new metropolis of the plains.’ Most of this stuff was pure moonshine, but it sounded good.

Most folks lived in sod houses, for wood was hard to find on those wind-swept plains. The typical’soddie’ had turf walls about 2 feet thick, with a sod roof laid across timber rafters and a mat of green branches. There was a door, of course, or maybe two, and perhaps even a couple of inside walls to create separate rooms. There might or might not be windows, and if there were, their closures were likely to be wooden shutters, since glass was scarce and expensive. All around these isolated soddies lay the empty prairie.

At first there was much hard feeling between cattlemen and settlers. The range, once clear and open, was no longer so, and there was a good deal of fence-cutting and crops eaten and trampled by stock. On the other hand, many ‘nesters’ were not above supplementing their meager diet with beef, which often belonged to somebody else.

Any collection of more than two buildings qualified as a town in No Man’s Land. ‘Most towns,’ according to one account, ‘were made up of three or four sod houses grouped around a larger sod structure housing a country stock of merchandise. Only Beaver reached the dignity of a village.

Beaver was also a major collection point for much of the riffraff of the area. Crime was rampant, including murder.  The law didn’t care about murder, because there was no law.  Criminals simply went unpunished, unless an irate citizenry could organize in time to deal with them.

Along with the hard-working nesters and cattlemen, large and small, came the grifters, the bullies and the thieves.  A persistent pest was a highly specialized breed of con man called the ‘road-trotter.’ These lowlifes filled their bellies by making specious claims on other people’s land, either occupying the claim in the owner’s absence or producing a forged instrument of title. They would generally go away if the owner bought them off.

In addition to the general run of no-goods, No Man’s Land was amply supplied with liquor sellers.. There were a good number of liquor establishments, thanks in large measure to ax-wielding Carry Nation and her Anti-Saloon League. Carry’s depredations up in Kansas had pretty well dried up the Sunflower State, and the nearest place to get a legal drink for many Kansans was No Man’s Land.

Liberal, just across the Kansas line, was an especially thirsty town. To accommodate Liberal’s taste for booze and other more intimate indoor sports, a little town popped up just over the border in No Man’s Land. It called itself Beer City.

There was nothing much in Beer City but saloons and dance halls. It never had a church or a school or even a post office. Many of the ladies of the evening who staffed Beer City’s houses commuted from Liberal, traveling between the two towns in the daily horse-drawn hack.

Predictably known as the ‘Sodom and Gomorrah of the Plains,’ Beer City knew no holidays, for its business was constant merriment. The entrepreneurs who ran the Elephant, the Yellow Snake and the other saloons advertised their town as the only place ‘in the civilized world where there is absolutely no law.’ They staged dances, horse races, boxing and wrestling matches, and Wild West shows to keep their customers amused between drinks. Some of them even furnished ‘drunk pens,’ wire enclosures in which a sodden cowboy could sleep it off without getting rolled for any money he had left.

The town had other kinds of entertainment, too, much of it unplanned and violent. There was, for example, the day on which Pussy Cat Nell, madam of the house above the Yellow Snake Saloon, ushered town marshal Lew Bush into the next world with her shotgun. The cause of their falling out is not recorded, but there is no evidence that Pussy Cat Nell’s impulsive act was regarded as worthy of censure. Besides, she ran an essential service, and Marshal Bush had been rustling on the side.

Since Beer City and its competitors were a very long way from any kind of real distillery, and since cowboys seldom cared much what sort of booze they drank, the liquor supply, such as it was, tended to come from local sources. Thus the making of white lightning became a favorite — and semirespectable — occupation for a good many residents of No Man’s Land.

In time, enthusiastic residents of No Man’s Land formed a provisional government, as they called it. They had a great seal made and used it to fire off petitions to Washington, D.C., for territorial status. They grandly called their new land Cimarron Territory, in fact, in the forlorn hope that the name and their activity would move the Congress to favorably consider their ambitions. They sent a couple of competing representatives to Washington, too, and even found some allies in Congress, but the area would remain an orphan until the Oklahoma Organic Act of 1890 made it part of brand-new Oklahoma Territory.

For many (most?) residents of No Man’s Land, the living was lonely and farming was a hardscrabble life. Wheat prices were not high enough to make much money, and the nearest railheads were still up in Kansas. There was a severe drought in 1888, and as a last straw the supply of beef and buffalo bones was nearly exhausted, and so too were buffalo and cow chips, the staple fuel. A mournful nester jingle went:

Pickin’ up bones to keep from starving,
Pickin’ up chips to keep from freezing,
Pickin’ up courage to keep from leaving,
Way out West in No Man’s Land.

Getting back to Guymon – this, from OKGenWeb:

Since 1933 the signing or the Organic Act has been celebrated in Guymon, OK. The act combined No Man’s Land and Oklahoma Indian Territory to form Oklahoma Territory on May 2,1890. The celebration (known as Pioneer Days) continues today in May with the nation’s largest outdoor professional rodeos, parades, bar-b-ques, and much more.

Here are a couple of shots of the 1934 Guymon Pioneer Day celebration (from OKGenWeb):

PioneerDay1934-1

pioneerday2-1okgenweb 1934

Wow.  A big deal, eh?

I’ll close with a couple of pictures.  First this, from the FDR Library at Marist University, of a horse-drawn scraper removing wind-blown silt from a road during the 1930’s dust bowl era:

removing drifts of soil fdr library, marist.edu

I couldn’t find much in the way of GE Panoramio shots; just this near Hooker, by Black Mesa Images:

pano black mesa images

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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Warner Valley (and Plush), Oregon

Posted by graywacke on March 29, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2256; A Landing A Day blog post number 686.

Dan:  Well, here I go again, landing in a state with multiple landings already – this is the fourth OR landing since I changed my lat/long procedure, 40 landings ago.  Of course, OR is oversubscribed (OS) and of course my Score went up (from 942 to 948).  If you’re wondering (and care) what I’m talking about, check out the tab “About Landing (Revisited),” above.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map — with a sneak preview of my site drainage (the blue arrow):

landing 2a

You can see the towns of Plush and Adel.  Trust me, they ain’t much, so I decided to feature the Warner Valley, which is the repository for any runoff leaving my landing location.

I zoomed back a little to show you that I have a little cluster of landings in this isolated patch of S-Cen Oregon (today’s is the eastern-most):

landing 2b

My watershed analysis will be Google Earth (GE) – based, so it’s time for my GE spaceflight in to S-Cen OR.  Click HERE, enjoy the flight; then hit your back button.

I don’t know if you noticed, but it looks like I landed near a drainage divide.  Take a look – the drainage on the left slopes north and the drainage on the right slopes south:

watershed 1

I backed up a little, put in some pins along the crest of the watershed, and drew a line showing the watershed boundary:

watershed

You can see that I landed in the Warner Valley watershed (barely), and therefore was able to feature the Warner Valley in this post.  By the way, I’ve featured Malheur Lake (which is part of the now-notorious Malheur National Wildlife Refuge) in two separate posts, both using Burns, Oregon as the titular town.

As you can see on my local landing map (way above), Flagstaff Lake is the lowest point in the valley; the lakes further south increase in elevation. So technically, in the event of a large-enough rainfall, runoff will end up in Flagstaff Lake.

 

When researching Warner Valley, I discovered that this part of Oregon is part of the Basin and Range geologic (physiologic) province.  I knew it included all of Nevada, but I wasn’t aware that southern Oregon lays claim to its fair share.  Here’s a map showing the extent of the province (from USGS):

usgs basin and range

And here’s a detail of Oregon (from the State of Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Resources), showing the Basin & Range, along with the other physiologic provinces in the state:

oregon geology map

Anyway, here’s what the USGS has to say about the province:

Within the Basin and Range Province, the Earth’s crust (and upper mantle) has been stretched up to 100% of its original width. The entire region has been subjected to extension that thinned and cracked the crust as it was pulled apart, creating large faults. Along these roughly north-south-trending faults mountains were uplifted and valleys down-dropped, producing the distinctive alternating pattern of linear mountain ranges and valleys of the Basin and Range province.

The upthrown side of these faults form mountains that rise abruptly and steeply, and the down-dropped side creates low valleys. The fault plane, along which the two sides of the fault move, extends deep in the crust, usually an angle of 60 degrees. In places, the relief or vertical difference between the two sides is as much as 10,000 feet.

Here’s some more info from marlmillerphoto.com:

Geologically, the mountains rise and tilt along normal fault zones, while the basins drop and tilt along the faults. A simple cross-section across several ranges is illustrated in the diagram below.

tiltedfaultblocks

Also from marlmillerphoto is this aerial shot of a typical basin and range landscape (this is from eastern Nevada):

basin and range aerial photo

You may have noticed that the USGS write-up above doesn’t actually address the underlying reason for the crustal stretching and faulting.  It turns out that as huge and as in-your-face as the Basin & Range province is, there is still controversy and disagreement among geologists about the underlying mechanisms. 

I’m happy enough with the following simple video (from The National Park Service):

 

So, the Warner Valley is a “basin” and the mountains to the east “Hart Mountain” are the “range.”  Here’s a Wiki shot of Hart Mountain:

Warner_Lakes,_Lake_County,_Oregon

 

Quite dramatic.  By the way, the next ridge to the west is 25 miles away.

Before diving into scenery photos, here’s a little tidbit from Wiki about the town Plush:

The name Plush is said to have derived from a mispronunciation of the word flush during a 19th century poker game played in the community.  Daniel Boone, a relative of the famous Kentucky pathfinder of the same name, became postmaster in 1898 and opened a general store in conjunction with the post office.

I don’t buy it.  No way someone meant to name it Flush, and they “mispronounced” it as Plush.  As I have done in other similar circumstances, I’ve concocted a story about the name origin that’s a little more realistic:

A highly dramatic poker game was set up between two of the original settlers (Settler A and Settler B).   The prize for the winner was to be able to name the town.  The two gamblers agreed before hand that the name could not have anything to do with the given name of the winner. 

So Settler A wins, thanks to a flush that won the biggest pot of the game.  He announces that the name of the town would thenceforth be “Flush.”

Settler B says “Come on, A.  That sounds like something you do when you clean out the chamber pot.  How about Plush?  There’s plenty of green out here in the valley.”  And it was so agreed.

Time for some GE Panoramio photos. And this collection, in my opinion, is spectacular.  They are shot in Warner Valley.  I’ll start with this of Hart Mountain by Chris Earle:

pano chris earle

And here’s an ethereal shot by Drew Maddox:

pano drewmaddox

And this, of the Rabbit Hills (just west of Warner Valley) by Niche Spur:

pano nichespur

And back to Hart mountain, this, also by Niche Spur:

pano nichespur2

Staying with Hart mountain, this by Oregon Natural Desert:

pano oregon natural desert

Here’s an artsy shot of one of the lakes by PRBrandon:

pano prbrandon

And this, from the top of Hart Mountain (looking SW), by RF Bolton:

pano RF Bolton - looking sw from Warner Peak

I’ll close with tis Hart Mountain shot by PJ Murphy:

pano pjmurphy

 

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

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McCall, Roseberry (and Yellow Pine), Idaho

Posted by graywacke on March 25, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2255; A Landing A Day blog post number 685.

Dan:  This is my first landing in ID since I changed my random lat/long methodology, so obviously, ID is undersubscribed (US) and my Score has lowered (from 988 to 942, a record low).  Not so obvious to you?  Check out the tab “About Landing (Revisited),” above.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Here’s my very local streams-only map:

landing 3a

As you can see, I landed in the watershed of Copeland Ck; on to Boulder Ck.  Zooming back a little, Boulder Ck makes its way to the N Fk of the Payette R (2nd hit):

landing 3b

Zooming back even more, we can see that the N Fk of the Payette makes its way to the Payette (3rd hit); then to the Snake (78th hit):

landing 3c

Of course, the Snake discharges to the Columbia (157th hit).

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight on in to W-Cen ID.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, then hit your back button.

I landed in a topographically-robust region; definitely worth a second (and third) GE look.  Here’s an oblique view looking SE:

ge 1

Pretty cool, eh?  Now, here’s a view looking east past McCall, with my landing in the far distance (about 8 miles away):

ge 2

There is no decent GE Street View (SV) coverage of my landing, so I won’t bother.  I had to go quite far afield (all the way down to Donnelly) to find a SV shot of Boulder Ck:

ge sv boulder ck map

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv boulder ck

This is a beautiful area, and I thoroughly enjoyed finding stunning scenery pictures, which of course I’ll share with you at the end of the post.  But I must admit that beyond the beauty of the area, it’s pretty much:

aa-hookless

McCall has grown to base its economy around tourists, and long-time readers know I don’t generally feature tourist attractions.  Lardo doesn’t really exist (it’s just part of McCall), although I did find a video about “moving the Lardo bridge.”  I’m not sure why they had to move the bridge, but it’s cool how they did it:

 

Not surprisingly, I’ve landed in this general area before.  One of my landings in the vicinity featured the “town” of Roseberry (which doesn’t even show up on my local landing map).  GE often shows little towns that don’t show up on Street Atlas, which is the case this time as well:

ge 3

I’ll lift some excerpts from my February 2010 Roseberry post:

On to Roseberry.  I lifted the following from Our Life on Wheels (by Jerry & Suzy).  Click HERE for their travel blog.

01-roseberry

Roseberry, Idaho, is a town that used to be a town but isn’t any more because the railroad went a different direction [it went through Donnelly].  Roseberry, founded by Finns, used to be the biggest town in the Long Valley region of Idaho. Now it’s mostly a memory … and a major project of Frank and Kathy Eld. Frank has been working for 39 years to rebuild (focusing on the town’s Finnish heritage), to restore, and revitalize Roseberry, ever since he graduated from college. Kathy operates the Roseberry General Store and Museum while Frank rebuilds.

The store:

02-roseberry-store

The church & museum:

10-church-and-museum

One of the few remaining Finn houses:

15-finn-cabin

For a little more history, I found this from IGoUGo.com, by Wildcat Diane:

Roseberry, Idaho is an old Finnish settlement near Donnelly, Idaho. The Finns settled here in the late 19th century after fleeing the oppressive Russian empire who occupied Finland at the time. It is a source of local pride and a part of Idaho history and of who settled it.

The Finns had fled Russian-dominated Finland in the late 19th century because the czarist government wanted to eliminate the Finnish way of life and make Finland a part of Russia. The Finns fled to the United States and settled in Idaho because Idaho reminded the Finns of home with its mountains and open fields that were suitable for their agricultural way of life.

Update:  The whole kit and caboodle (aka the town of Roseberry) has been sold to the Long Valley Preservation Society, which is continuing to maintain and upgrade the historic town.  Very cool.  There’s a new website for Roseberry; it features this picture of a 1911 Fourth of July parade in Roseberry:

4th july

Moving right along, I’ll expand my landing map a little:

landing 2b

See Yellow Pine?  It’s about 20 miles east of my landing.  Yellow Pine has a long and storied history with my whole landing experience.  Here’s a rundown of Yellow Pine-related landings:

Untitled

 

I really recommend the post for landing 2119.  Just enter yellow pine into the search box and check it out.

Anyway . . . it’s time for some pretty pictures.  I’ll start with this shot from along the Payette River looking west (from a post on Virginia Tech geophysical surveys):

LongValleyID

From mountainsofexperience.com, the McCall waterfront:

mountains of experience mccall winter 2011

Now it’s time for GE Panoramio shots, all within 5 miles of my landing (and but one of lakes).  First this, by CKMcDonald of Boulder Lake, just a mile south of my landing:

pano ckmcdonald boulder lake 1 mile south

Here’s another Boulder Lake shot, by the same photographer:

pano ckmcdonald boulder lake 1 mile south 3

What the heck – the third in a series . . .

pano ckmcdonald boulder lake 1 mile south 2

And another lake shot, by M Kuskie:

pano mkuskie

And another, this one by Merritt Glenn:

pano merritt glenn

(I wonder how many times Merritt Glenn has said, “two Rs, two Ts and two Ns?”)

I’ll close with this, of a lovely mountain meadow by JLJohnson:

pano j l johnson

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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