A Landing a Day

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Imnaha and Joseph, Oregon

Posted by graywacke on February 4, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2244; A Landing A Day blog post number 672.

Dan:  For the third time since I straightened out my random lat/long landing procedure (just 28 landings ago), I’ve landed in . .  OR.  Check out the “About Landing (Revisited)” tab above to see what I’m talking about . . . 

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Because Google Earth (GE) provides a great shot of my watershed, I’ll jump to my GE spaceflight in to NE OR.  Click HERE, enjoy the ride, then hit the back button.

While the topography is not entirely obvious while looking straight down, here’s an oblique GE shot, looking north down the valley of Lightning Creek:

ge 1 looking n up lightning ck

Here’s my streams-only map, showing that the Lightning Creek makes its way to the Imnaha R (first hit ever!); on to the Snake (77th hit).  Trust me on this:  the Snake joins up with the Columbia (156th hit):

landing 3a

Here’s a Wiki shot of the Imnaha passing through Imnaha:

wiki imnaha river (by finetooth)

And a GE Pano shot of the same river by TBlackburn:

pano inmaha river tblackburn

What a great spot!

Here’s a GE shot of where the Imnaha joins up with the Snake:

ge 2 imnaha meets the snake

 

And here’s a Pano shot of the Snake by Tom Ringold just 5 miles east of my landing:

pano tom ringold snake 5 mi

As you can tell by the above river shots, I landed in a spectacularly beautiful area, but I think I’ll save additional scenery shots for the end of this post. 

Looking back at my local landing map, you can see that I landed closest to the town of Imnaha.  Both the town and the river were named after a chief Imna.  Imnaha (according to Wiki) means “land of Imna.”  Imagine that – “ha” must mean “land of.”  Illinois’ translated slogan:  Ha Lincoln.

Wiki says that Imnaha is best known as the gateway to the Hat Point scenic overlook, providing a spectacular of the Snake River and Hell’s Canyon.  Hat Point lies a mere 2 miles from my landing and will figure prominently in the scenery portion of this post.

So I checked out Enterprise (no hook) and then Joseph.  Joseph rang a bell with me and lo and behold, I featured Joseph in a July 2010 ALAD post.  Because I really liked that post (and because I’m lazy and recovering from open heart surgery), I’ll generously lift verbiage from that post (and don’t ever, ever forget the “i” in verbiage).

As already noted, I landed near the town of Joseph.  At first glance, I thought maybe Joseph was named after Joseph Smith.  Northeast Oregon is quite a ways from Salt Lake City, and I didn’t think the Mormons were big in Oregon, but who knows.  After all, I landed near Pima AZ, formerly called Smithville and named after Joseph Smith.  Pima AZ is a whopping 546 from Salt Lake City, while Joseph OR is only 418 miles away.

So, back to Joseph OR.  As you may suspect by now, it was not named after Joseph Smith.  In fact, it was named after a Chief of the Nez Perce Nation, Chief Joseph.  I found Chief Joseph to be fascinating; please read the following closely to appreciate the compelling story.  I’ve done some editing, but the following is generally from Wiki:

chiefjoseph

Chief Joseph (1840 – 1904) was the chief of the Wal-lam-wat-kain (Wallowa) band of Nez Perce.  For his principled resistance to the removal of his people to a reservation, he became renowned as a humanitarian and peacemaker.

Joseph the Younger succeeded his father as chief in 1871.  Before his death, the latter counseled his son:

“My son, my body is returning to my mother earth, and my spirit is going very soon to see the Great Spirit Chief. When I am gone, think of your country. You are the chief of these people. They look to you to guide them. Always remember that your father never sold his country. You must stop your ears whenever you are asked to sign a treaty selling your home. A few years more and white men will be all around you. They have their eyes on this land. My son, never forget my dying words. This country holds your father’s body. Never sell the bones of your father and your mother.”

Chief Joseph commented “I clasped my father’s hand and promised to do as he asked. A man who would not defend his father’s grave is worse than a wild animal.”

The Nez Perce suffered many injustices at the hands of settlers and prospectors, but out of fear of reprisal from the US military, Joseph never allowed any violence against them, instead making many concessions to them in hopes of securing peace.

Summarizing a lengthy Wiki passage:  after much tactically maneuvering & negotiations, the U.S. Army demanded that the Nez Perce relocate to a reservation in Idaho.  Joseph decided that peace was more important than his dying fathers’ wishes, but other, younger Nez Perce chiefs wanted to fight.  I’ll pick up the story here, from Wiki:

With 2,000 U.S. soldiers in pursuit, Joseph and other Nez Perce chiefs led 800 Nez Perce towards freedom at the Canadian border.  For over three months, the Nez Perce outmaneuvered and battled their pursuers traveling 1,600 miles (2,570 km) across Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana.

General Howard, leading the opposing cavalry, was impressed with the skill with which the Nez Perce fought, using advance and rear guards, skirmish lines, and field fortifications. Finally, after a devastating five-day battle during freezing weather conditions with no food or blankets, Chief Joseph formally surrendered.  Here are the words attributed to Chief Joseph at the formal surrender:

“Tell General Howard I know his heart. What he told me before, I have it in my heart. I am tired of fighting. Our chiefs are killed; Looking Glass is dead, Too-hul-hul-sote is dead. The old men are all dead. It is the young men who say yes or no. He who led on the young men is dead. It is cold, and we have no blankets; the little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are—perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children, and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.”

His speech brought attention – and therefore credit – his way. He earned the praise of General William Tecumseh Sherman and became known in the press as “The Red Napoleon“.

Joseph’s fame did him little good. By the time Joseph surrendered more than 200 of his followers had died. His plight, however, did not end. Although he had negotiated a safe return home for his people, four hundred of the Nez Perce were taken on unheated rail cars to Fort Leavenworth in eastern Kansas to held in a prisoner-of-war campsite for eight months.  Toward the end of the following summer the surviving Nez Perce were taken by rail to a reservation in the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) for ten years.  Many of them died of epidemic diseases while there.  Finally they were returned to a reservation around Kooskia, Idaho.

In 1879 Chief Joseph went to Washington, D.C. to meet with President Rutherford B. Hayes and plead the case of his people. Finally, in 1885, Chief Joseph and his followers were allowed to return to the Pacific Northwest, although many, including Chief Joseph, were taken to the Colville Indian Reservation in NW Washington, far from both the rest of their people in Idaho and their homeland in the Wallowa Valley.

In his last years Joseph spoke eloquently against the injustice of United States policy toward his people and held out the hope that America’s promise of freedom and equality might one day be fulfilled for Native Americans as well. An indomitable voice of conscience for the West, he died in 1904, still in exile from his homeland.  According to his doctor, he died “of a broken heart.”

Here’s a shot of the Chief with his family.  I don’t blame them for not smiling.

400px-chief_joseph_and_family

Back to the here and now . . .

As promised, let’s take a look around my landing spot. Here’s a GE shot, looking SE past my landing towards Hat Point in the forground, which provides a spectacular overlook down into the Hell’s Canyon stretch of the Snake River:

ge 3 lookout etc

I’ll finish up with three GE Pano shots taken from Hat Point.  I’ll start with this one of the Point itself, by Niek Bouwen:

pano niek bouwen

Here’s a lovely overlook shot by Aaron Litt:

pano aaron litt

But the prizewinner is this, by Jason Abbott:

pano jason abbott

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Little River, Arkansas

Posted by graywacke on February 1, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2243; A Landing A Day blog post number 671.

Dan:  After an Arkansas landing, what do I do?  Why, I landed once again in . . . AR!  Of course, this makes my Score go up (from 1123 to 1126).  Have no clue what I’m talking about?  Check out my Grand Rapids Post.  Don’t care?  Just continue reading!

So this was my 57th double (where I landed in the same state two times in a row).  This was the second double for Arkansas, the first being landings 516 and 517 (August 2004).

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my very local landing map:

landing 2a

 

Obviously, (based on the title of this post), there will be more about Little River coming up (and more about the peculiarly-named Left Hand Chute).

Zooming back a little, here’s a not-so-local landing map:

landing 2b

As it turns out, my watershed analysis is very central to this entire post, so I think I’ll jump first to my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to NE AR.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and then hit your “back” button.

I have excellent GE Street View (SV) coverage; here’s a map:

ge landing sv map

 

And here’s what the orange dude sees.

ge landing sv

Look back up at my local landing map and you’ll notice the “town” of Little River.  It would be a fair guess that I’m featuring that town for this post.  Fair guess, but wrong.

Let’s use GE to take a closer look at this thriving metropolis:

ge little river town

I won’t bother showing you a closer-in look, but there are five or six homes there.  The town has no internet presence at all.  Nothing in Wiki, no entry on the Encyclopedia of Arkansas website (which is a great website with lots of detail).  So what’s going on?

Well, as mentioned above, this post turned on my watershed analysis.  So here’s my typical local streams-only map:

landing 3a

So, I landed in the watershed of the Left Hand Chute of the Little River.  As you can see, with just a little poking around, I discovered that there is also a Right Hand Chute of the Little River.  But zooming back (and losing a lot of waterway detail), it sure looks like the Left Hand Chute of the Little River doesn’t do what might be expected:

landing 3bb

 

It doesn’t hook up with the Right Hand Chute; in fact, the Right Hand Chute seems to have disappeared altogether, replaced by the nattily-named “Ditch 2”; and there is no plain ol’ Little River anywhere to be seen. 

Mysteriouser and mysteriouser . . . 

So what the heck.  I took the plunge and Googled “Left Hand Chute Little River.”  I saw that the Encyclopedia of Arkansas had an entry entitled “Little River (Northeast Arkansas).”  Google being Google, I knew that the article must reference that pesky Left Hand Chute somewhere.  And it did.

Here are some excerpts:

The Little River starts in southeast Missouri, and flows southward.  After crossing the Missouri-Arkansas state line, it enters the Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge near Manila. Running a length of 148 miles, the Little River is a tributary of the St. Francis River.

Before the New Madrid Earthquakes of 1811–1812, the Little River was a swift, free-flowing stream. In the twenty-first century, it is not much more than a series of stagnant mud holes due to the channeling and ditching of the Little River Drainage District.

Wow.  This is really getting interesting.  The Little River is (or was) 148 miles long, but lost its identity because of the New Madrid Earthquakes?  This is getting my geological juices flowing!  Continuing:

Before the 1811–1812 earthquakes, the Little River was fed by the Whitewater River.  Flatboats traveled and traded up and down the Little River and made connection to the St. Francis River.

However, the three major earthquakes of 1811–1812 changed that. Travel by flatboats to and on the Little River became impossible, and the connections to the St. Francis River had also disappeared. Falling trees and caving banks had blocked the river and bayous connecting them. Natural depressions made by the quakes soon filled with water, forming lakes and swamps.

Water could no longer move smoothly downstream through the Little River channel. The flow was forced out of the channel and spread through the hardwood forest lining the river bank. Yearly spring floods forced the water deeper into the woods. What had been small area of lowlands became major wetlands.

Between 1914 and 1929, the Little River Drainage District was formed to drain an area ninety miles long and ten to twenty miles wide. This was accomplished by digging 958 miles of ditches and building 304 miles of levee.

The area is heavily channeled, with the Little River losing most of its identity.  The floodway leaving the Big Lake area is roughly one mile wide enclosed by ten-foot levees.

Finally!  Here comes the reference to the Left Hand Chute:

Running through the floodway are waterways that include various numbered ditches as well as the Left Hand Chute of Little River and the Right Hand Chute of Little River.

Well there you have it.  Being the watershed nerd that I am, I rolled up my sleeves to get a closer look.  Using the Streams Only feature of StreetAtlas, I found a couple of stretches of stream that were actually identified as “Little River.”  The stretches didn’t connect with each other, so I added some blue lines (and added the location of New Madrid for reference):

landing 3d

Peculiarly, it looks like the very upstream portion of the Little River actually connects with another stream or river.  Hey.  That’s not how nature works, so I took a closer look:

landing 3e

So the Whitewater River (which, as mentioned in the Encyclopedia  of Arkansas article, flows to the Little River) seems to begin very closer to a waterway labeled “Headwaters Access,” whatever the heck that is.  Wow.  Thanks to the earthquakes, this is one screwed up watershed.

Going back to my landing area.  The E of A article mentioned 958 miles of canals and ditches.  Here’s a patch of said waterways near my landing:

landing 3b

Before I forget, this is my first landing in the Little River watershed.  The Little (sort of) discharges to the St. Francis (5th hit, making the St. Francis the 162nd river on my list of rivers with 5 or more hits).  Here’s a map showing the St. Francis discharging into the MM (879th hit):

landing 3c

Before focusing on the New Madrid Earthquakes, here’s a GE map showing SV coverage for the Left Hand Chute:

ge sv left hand map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv left hand

So now you know my hook (the New Madrid Earthquakes) and how I found it.  I immediately had the feeling that I had never featured the New Madrid Earthquakes on this blog, and a quick search proved that out.  It’s about time!

I’ll start with a USGS map showing the earthquake zone:

100628.New.Madrid.EQ usgs

From Wiki, here’s a quick rundown on the series of quakes in 1811 and 1812:

  • December 16, 1811 (2:15 a.m.); (mag. 7.5 -7.9) epicenter in northeast Arkansas.
  • December 16, 1811 (aftershock) (8:15 a.m.); (mag. 7.4) epicenter in northeast Arkansas. This shock followed the first earthquake by five hours and was similar in intensity.
  • January 23, 1812 (9:00 a.m.); (mag. 7.3 -7.6) epicenter in the Missouri Bootheel.
  • February 7, 1812 (3:45 a.m.); (mag. 7.5 -8.0) epicenter near New Madrid, Missouri. New Madrid was destroyed. In St. Louis, Missouri, many houses were severely damaged, and their chimneys were toppled. Uplift along a segment of the ruptured fault (now known as the Reelfoot fault) created temporary waterfalls on the Mississippi at Kentucky Bend, created waves that propagated upstream, and caused the formation of Reelfoot Lake by obstructing streams in what is now Lake County, Tennessee,

To keep us all oriented, here’s a map showing Reelfoot Lake:

landing reelfoot lake

What an amazing sequence.  Four very large earthquakes (just one termed an aftershock), all about the same magnitude, all very powerful.  It’s hard to imagine the damage and chaos that this same series of earthquakes would cause today.

Here are some great eye-witness descriptions (from Wiki):

John Bradbury was on the Mississippi on the night of December 15, 1811, and describes the tremors in great detail in his Travels in the Interior of America in the Years 1809, 1810 and 1811.

After supper, we went to sleep as usual: about ten o’clock, and in the night I was awakened by the most tremendous noise, accompanied by an agitation of the boat so violent, that it appeared in danger of upsetting … I could distinctly see the river as if agitated by a storm; and although the noise was inconceivably loud and terrific, I could distinctly hear the crash of falling trees, and the screaming of the wild fowl on the river, but found that the boat was still safe at her moorings.

By the time we could get to our fire, which was on a large flag in the stern of the boat, the shock had ceased; but immediately the perpendicular banks, both above and below us, began to fall into the river in such vast masses, as nearly to sink our boat by the swell they occasioned … At day-light we had counted twenty-seven shocks.

Pretty intense, eh?  And the riverbanks all collapsed into the river!

Eliza Bryan in New Madrid, wrote the following eyewitness account in March 1812.

On the 16th of December, 1811, about two o’clock, a.m., we were visited by a violent shock of an earthquake, accompanied by a very awful noise resembling loud but distant thunder, but more hoarse and vibrating, which was followed in a few minutes by the complete saturation of the atmosphere, with sulphurious vapor, causing total darkness. The screams of the affrighted inhabitants running to and fro, not knowing where to go, or what to do—the cries of the fowls and beasts of every species—the cracking of trees falling, and the roaring of the Mississippi— the current of which was retrograde for a few minutes, owing as is supposed, to an irruption in its bed— formed a scene truly horrible.

As a geologist, I should roll up my sleeves and try to understand the underlying geologic setting of the New Madrid Seismic Zone.  But what I should do and what I actually do are not always aligned.  I’ll settle with this brief (and vague) Wiki write-up:

The underlying cause of the earthquakes is not well understood, but modern faulting seems to be related to an ancient geologic feature buried under the Mississippi River alluvial plain, known as the Reelfoot Rift. The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is made up of reactivated faults that formed when what is now North America began to split apart during the breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia (about 750 million years ago). Numerous faults were created along the rift. The resulting fault system failed but has remained as an aulacogen (a scar or zone of weakness) deep underground.

That’s enough for me!

It’s time to put a wrap on this post.  Here’s a GE shot near my landing showing numerous Pano shots up near Big Lake):

ge pano shot map

I picked three for your viewing pleasure.  I’ll start with this shot of a cypress tree by Duckman870:

pano duckman870

And then this watery vista by RedCloudSky:

pano redcloudsky

I’ll close with a sunset shot, also by RedCloudSky:

pano redcloudsky2

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Parkdake and Hamburg, Arkansas

Posted by graywacke on January 27, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2242; A Landing A Day blog post number 670.

Dan:  Phew.  After five landings in a row in repeat states, I finally landed in a new one . . . AR, lowering my Score from 1155 to 1123 (a new record low).  Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Here’s my local streams-only map:

landing 3a

As you can see, I landed in the watershed of the Big Bayou (2nd hit); on to the Boeuf River (5th hit, making the Boeuf the 161st river on my list of rivers with 5 or more hits).

Note that I’m not far from the Mississippi (less than 20 miles).  As you’ll see, a drop of water at my landing makes to the Gulf of Mexico without ever saying hello to the MM.  Zooming back a little, and can see that the Boeuf discharges into the Ouachita (12th hit):

landing 3b

Here’s the whole picture:

landing 3c

The Ouachita makes its way to the Black (13th hit); on to the Red (61st hit); and on to the most melodic sounding river, the Atchafalaya (68th hit).

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight on in to SE AR.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and then hit your “back” button.

My GE Street View coverage isn’t very good, as I can’t get closer than 3 miles to my landing spot.  As it turns out, I decided to double up.  I put the orange dude on a bridge over the Big Bayou, so here’s my landing SV shot combined with my local stream SV shot:

ge sv landing map

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

So, of course I checked out all of the little towns in the general vicinity of my landing.  I couldn’t find much, but not much will just have to do. 

From the Encyclopedia of Arkansas about Parkdale, this unexpected story of a lawless mob taking the law into its own hands:

In the early part of the twentieth century, Parkdale became notorious for violent crimes, including murders. One citizen later said, “Parkdale was terrible. There were a bunch of outlaws. It was a shoot-up town….There was a rough and rowdy white element here. It was wild.”

[Interesting that the quoted citizen had to make sure that his readers knew that there was a rowdy white element. . . ]

One of the most unusual crimes in Parkdale was the lynching of Ernest Williams, an African-American man, in June 1908. A group of African-American women had organized a league to enforce better moral conduct, and Williams had evidently not complied with their standards. Consequently, they seized him one evening, dragged him to a telegraph pole on the outskirts of Parkdale, and hanged him. His body was not discovered by local authorities until the next morning, and no one was ever charged with the crime.

Wow.  If ever a crime was going to go unpunished, this sounds like this would be the one.  Time to move over the Hamburg, proud I am sure of their native son Scottie Pippin.  Most of us know that Scottie playing for the Chicago Bulls during the Michael Jordan era.  Anyway, here are some excerpts from Wiki:

Scottie Pippen was born in 1965 in Hamburg, Arkansas, the youngest of 12 children born to Ethel and Preston Pippen.  Scottie’s mother was 6 feet tall and his father was 6’1″; all of their children were tall with Scottie being the tallest. His parents could not afford to send their other children to college. His father worked in a paper mill until a stroke paralyzed his right side, prevented him from walking and affected his speech.

Pippen attended Hamburg High School. Playing point guard, he led his team to the state playoffs and earned all-conference honors as a senior, playing at a modest height of 6’ 1’’. He was not offered any college scholarships. Pippen played his college ball at the University of Central Arkansas in Conway, but did not receive much recognition until the end of his college career.  He kept growing while in college, eventually reaching 6’8″.  As a senior, his per game averages of 23.6 points, 10 rebounds, 4.3 assists and near 60 percent field goal shooting earned the attention and respect of NBA scouts.

No one could have guessed that a 6’ 1” guard who managed to succeed as a walk-on at the University of Central Arkansas would end up being a legitimate NBA star.  My guess is that you already know all you care to know about Scottie Pippin.  In the unlikely event that you want to learn more, you are on your own.

Here’s a shot of three stars of the great 1996 Bulls team:  Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippin and Dennis Rodman.

scottie-pippen-1996-bulls

I was tempted to say something about Dennis Rodman and North Korea, but decided not to bother beyond the modest sentence you’re now reading.

Anyway, it’s time to put a wrap on this post.  Consistent with my difficulty in finding decent hooks, I came up pretty empty on my GE Panoramio photo search.  I’ll close with this sunset shot over a cotton field, taken by OtterGreer a few miles NW of my landing:

77172086

 

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Cody, Wyoming

Posted by graywacke on January 22, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2241; A Landing A Day blog post number 669.

Dan:  As is obvious from the title of this post, I landed in . . . WY.  This is the fifth state in a row that has been a repeater since I changed my lat/long landing procedure 25 landings ago.  Bottom line:  my Score continues to rise instead of falling (as it must inevitably do), moving from 1151 to 1155.

Anyway . . . here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of Buck Creek, on to the Shoshone R (2nd hit):

landing 3a

Zooming back, one can see that the Shoshone makes its way to the Big Horn (19th hit); on to the Yellowstone (55th hit); and on to the Missouri (406th hit):

landing 3b

Of course, the Missouri is part of the watershed of the MM (878th hit).

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) space flight in to NW Wyoming.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip and then hit your back button.

Staying with Google Earth, here’s a shot showing Street View coverage:

ge sv landing map

Even though it’s a ways away, I have a clear shot of my landing and Heart Mountain.  Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

Speaking of the orange dude, I had to take him all the way south to Cody to get a look at the Shoshone River which passes through a cool water gap on its way to Cody:

ge sv shoshone

Staying with the Shoshone, here’s a GE Panoramio shot of the river between my landing and Cody (by Elifino 57):

pano elifino57

So.  Cody’s a substantial city (pop 10,000, making it the 11th most-populous city in WY) and it’s only 9 miles away.  So, Cody it is. 

While I’ve heard of Cody and I’m pretty sure I knew that Buffalo Bill’s last name was Cody, but I didn’t realize the connection between the man and the town.  Until now.  I think I’ll jump right to the Cody Wyoming story before presenting some interesting tidbits about BB’s life.  From Wiki:

Cody first passed through the area that was to become Cody in the 1870s. He was so impressed by the development possibilities from irrigation, rich soil, grand scenery, hunting, and proximity to Yellowstone Park that he returned in the mid-1890s to start a town. The town was incorporated in 1901.

In November 1902, Cody opened the Irma Hotel, which he named after his daughter. He envisioned that a growing number of tourists would be coming to Cody via the recently opened Burlington rail line. He expected that they would proceed up the Cody Road along the North Fork of the Shoshone River to visit Yellowstone Park. To accommodate travelers, Cody completed construction of the Wapiti Inn in 1905 along the Cody Road.

He owned about 8,000 acres of land around Cody and ran about 1,000 head of cattle.  He operated a dude ranch, pack horse camping trips, and big game hunting business at and from his ranch. In his spacious ranch house, he entertained notable guests from Europe and America.

So who was this guy?  I seem to remember something about a Wild West Show.  Well, here are some Wiki tidbits:

Born in Iowa in 1846, moved to Kansas in 1853.

Father Isaac was staunch anti-slavery activist, was harassed for his stance; was stabbed twice with a Bowie knife after making an anti-slavery speech.

Isaac spent time away from home for his own safety. His enemies learned of a planned visit to his family and plotted to kill him on the way. The young Cody, despite his youth and being ill at the time, rode 30 miles to warn his father.

Cody’s father went to Cleveland, Ohio to organize a colony of thirty families to bring back to Kansas, in order to add to the anti-slavery population. During his return trip he caught a respiratory infection which, compounded by the lingering effects of his stabbing led to Isaac Cody’s death in April 1857.

At age 13, he joined Johnston’s Army as an unofficial member of the scouts assigned to guide the United States Army to Utah, to put down a rumored rebellion by the Mormon population of Salt Lake City.

According to Cody’s account in Buffalo Bill’s Own Story, the Utah War was where he first began his career as an “Indian fighter”:

Presently the moon rose, dead ahead of me; and painted boldly across its face was the figure of an Indian. He wore this war-bonnet of the Sioux, at his shoulder was a rifle pointed at someone in the river-bottom 30 feet below; in another second he would drop one of my friends. I raised my old muzzle-loader and fired. The figure collapsed, tumbled down the bank and landed with a splash in the water. “What is it?” called McCarthy, as he hurried back. “It’s over there in the water.” “Hi!” he cried. ‘Little Billy’s killed an Indian all by himself!’ So began my career as an Indian fighter.

At the age of 14, in 1860 Cody was struck by gold fever, but on his way to the gold fields, he met an agent for the Pony Express. He signed with them, and after building several stations and corrals, Cody was given a job as a rider.

When he was 17, he enlisted as a Private in the Union Army, Kansas Cavalry.  He served two years.

Here’s a picture of him at 19:

Buffalo_Bill_age_19

He moved to Rochester NY and got married.  He had four children, two of whom died young while still in Rochester.

In 1867 he moved back west, and hunted buffalo for the railroad. This was when he got his nickname “Buffalo Bill.”  Cody is purported to have killed 4,282 buffalo in eighteen months, (1867–1868).

He was then a scout for the Army during various Indian wars.  He scouted for Indians and fought in 16 battles.

The legend is born

In 1869, Cody met Ned Buntline who wrote a story published in the New York Weekly which was based on Cody’s adventures (largely made up by Buntline). Then Buntline published a highly successful novel, Buffalo Bill, King of the Bordermen. Buntline wrote many other sequels from 1870s through the early part of the twentieth century.

Here’s an 1875 picture (likely his most-dudely time of life):

Buffalo_Bill_Cody_ca1875

And an 1880 shot (still quite dudely):

220px-Buffalo_Bill_Cody_by_Sarony,_c1880

In 1883, Cody founded “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West”, a circus-like attraction.  With his show, Cody traveled throughout the United States and Europe.

Shows typically began with a parade on horseback, with participants from horse-culture groups that included US military, foreign military, cowboys, American Indians, and performers from all over the world in their best attire.  Turks, Gauchos, Arabs, Mongols and Georgians, displayed their distinctive horses and colorful costumes. Visitors would see feats of skill, staged races, and sideshows. Many historical western figures participated in the show. For example, Sitting Bull appeared with a band of 20 of his braves.  Annie Oakley and Wild Bill Hickok also appeared.

Performers re-enacted the riding of the Pony Express, Indian attacks on wagon trains, and stagecoach robberies. Some shows ended with a re-enactment of Custer’s Last Stand, in which Cody portrayed General Custer.  More commonly, the finale was a portrayal of an Indian attack on a settler’s cabin. Cody would ride in with an entourage of cowboys to defend the family.

Here’s an 1890 shot of Buffalo Bill with Sitting Bull and friends:

1024px-Buffalo_Bills_Wild_West_Show,_1890

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West toured Europe eight times, the first four tours between 1887 and 1892, and the last four from 1902 to 1906.

Here’s a wistful shot of Bill (1903).  If Springsteen were around, Bill would be humming “Glory Days”:

Buffalo_bill_cody 1903

And a poster advertising the show (about the same timeframe):

Adventures_of_Buffalo_Bill

Cody died in 1917 at his sister’s home in Denver.  He was baptized into the Catholic Church the day before his death.

Phew.  Close call for Buffalo Bill’s immortal soul.

Philosophy

As a frontier scout, Cody respected Indians and supported their rights. He employed many, as he thought his show offered them good pay with a chance to improve their lives. He described them as “the former foe, present friend, the American”, and once said, “Every Indian outbreak that I have ever known has resulted from broken promises and broken treaties by the government.”

Many Indian family members traveled with the men, and Cody encouraged the wives and children of his Indian performers to set up camp – as they would in their homelands – as part of the show. He wanted the paying public to see the human side of the “fierce warriors”; that they had families like any other, and had their own distinct cultures.

There you have it.  I bet that you now know more about Buffalo Bill Cody than you did a few minutes ago.

Time for some GE Pano shots of Heart Mountain.  First this, looking east by BroxTopD:

pano broxtopd

I’ll close with this shot taken just north of my landing (looking west), by K. Stahley:

pano K. Stahley

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Alkali Lake and Wagontire, Oregon

Posted by graywacke on January 17, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.

Landing number 2240; A Landing A Day blog post number 668.

Dan:  As is obvious from the title of this post, I landed in . . . OR.  This is the fourth state in a row that has been a repeater since I changed my lat/long landing procedure 24 landings ago.  More casual readers:  please skip on down to my regional landing map.  To members of the more serious ALAD nation, read on. . .

For my last 24 landings, I’ve landed in OR twice, SD twice, MN twice, OK twice, MO twice, IA twice and TX a whopping five times!  Here’s my list of larger states with zero landings:  AL, AR, CA, FL, GA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, ME, NE, NV, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, PA, SC, TN, UT, VA, WA, WI.

Interesting side bar:  I haven’t landed in OH since landing 1809 (and landing 1806 just before that).  That’s over 400 landings without landing in OH!  And I haven’t landed in AL since landing 1749, nearly 500 landings ago! 

The LG (Landing God) works in mysterious ways.  But more to the point right now, I’m ready for a bunch of landings in the above long list of states (which will make my Score go down as inevitably it must . . .)

So here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my very local landing map:

landing 2a

This might not be the first time, but it’s extremely rare that my local landing map shows no towns.  I’ll zoom back a little, and show you not only towns (including Wagontire), but two previous landings nearby:

landing 2b

These other landings certainly influenced my decision not to feature Silver Lake or Summer Lake (the only two actual towns), since they have been well covered by previous posts.

Anyway, it’s time for my space flight in to S-Cen Oregon.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and then hit your back button.

Here’s a static view showing my three local landings:

ge 1

Regular readers may wonder what has happened to my watershed analysis.  Well, my usual streams-only StreetAtlas map tells me nothing.  But here’s the real story, courtesy of GE:

ge alkali lake

So this is an obvious “internal” watershed, with runoff from my site going no further than Alkali Lake.  By the way, this is my third Alkali Lake internal landing, with one Alkali Lake in Nevada and one in Nebraska.

 Here’s some of what Wiki has to say about this Alkali Lake:

Alkali Lake reached a prehistoric maximum depth of 270 feet and covered about 1450 square miles. Since then, its water level has varied, with an overall drying trend, and is currently dry much of the year.

While it’s interesting that the lake used to be huge, lakes all over the intermontaine West were huge at the end of the the last glacial advance, say 8,000 years ago. So why feature Alkali Lake?  Well, there’s an interesting environmental site at the lake.

The following is loosely taken from Wiki & OregonLive.com:

As the Vietnam War raged, a Portland herbicide manufacturer stored 25,000 barrels of highly toxic and in many cases carcinogenic waste along the southwest shore of Alkali Lake from 1969 to 1971, including components of the Agent Orange herbicide widely used in the war.

These drums were stored with a permit from the Oregon Department of Agriculture, which shut down the operation in 1971 due to poor management practices at the site.

[With permission from the State of Oregon?  “Store” 25,000 drums of hazardous waste?????  What the heck??  And what were they going to do with the drums after “storing” them?  I don’t care how well managed the site was, it was an inevitable environmental disaster.  You can blur over the following, but here are some of what the drums contained:]

The drums contained pesticides and pesticide by-products including 2,4-D and MCPA herbicide residue containing chlorophenols, polymeric chlorophenoxyphenols and dioxins/furans (including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin).

[The 2,3,7,8 dioxin is one of the most toxic compounds known to man.]

The State of Oregon took over the site in 1974, after losing legal actions against the chemical company to force their compliance with new hazardous waste laws.

In 1976, at a cost of $84,000, the state used bulldozers to push, crush and compact the leaking barrels into a dozen shallow, unlined, 400′ long trenches, then covered them with soil.

It doesn’t get an uglier than this.  I’ll wager that this is the worst $84,000 ever spent in the history of environmental cleanups.  Take a horrific situation and make it immeasurably worse . . .

You gotta check out this YouTube video posted by CraigLaw.  (It’s a choppy video with no production value, but stay with it):

So, here’s some more info from the same sources:

The dumpsite is 10.3 acres and contains an estimated 800,000 to 1.4 million gallons of toxic waste at the site, and is called one of Oregon’s worst toxic-waste dumps by the project manager at the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ).

The DEQ performed a human health and environmental risk assessment of the site and determined that although there is a 40-acre area of contaminated groundwater, there is no discernible risk associated with the site, as long the site remains fenced and covered.

At the present time, there are no plans to clean up the site.

As one might imagine, more than one environmental group believes that the site should be cleaned up.  I read that one cleanup estimate is about $50 million; I’m in the business, and would at least double that . . .

I searched Google Earth, and here’s what I believe is the “site” (it’s the right size, about 10 acres, so this must be it):

ge waste site 1

Here’s a much closer view:

ge waste site 2

Enough depressing environmental stuff.  It’s time to move to Wagontire.  I love the Wiki entry:

Wagontire is an unincorporated community in Harney County, Oregon, United States, on U.S. Route 395. The population has varied recently between zero and two people.

From 1986 to at least 1997, Wagontire was home to two people: William and Olgie Warner.  Planes flying into Wagontire Airport would taxi across U.S. Route 395, fill up at the gas station and cafe.

Really?  There’s an airport?  Of course, I checked out GE.  And low and behold, there is an air strip of sorts right across Route 395 from a commercial establishment:

ge wagontire

The ALAD Truth Patrol verifies at least the likelihood that the Wiki entry is accurate.

Time for some GE Pano shots.  Speaking of Route 395, here’s a shot of it by John Ciccarelli near Alkali Lake:

pano john ciccarelli

And I’ll close with this shot of the “lake” by John Hains:

pano john hains

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Tama and Toledo, Iowa

Posted by graywacke on January 11, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2239; A Landing A Day blog post number 667.

Dan:  Once again (actually for the third time in a row), I’ve landed in a state that makes my Score go up.  This time it’s . . . IA.  Haven’t a clue what I’m talking about?  Search for and check out my Grand Rapids post.  Don’t care?   Just read on . . .

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

As you can see, I landed right next to the Iowa R (11th hit), which, as shown below, does not pass Go, does not collect $200, but goes directly to the MM (877th hit).

landing 3

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) space flight in to central Iowa.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and then click your back button.

GE Street View coverage of my landing isn’t great.  Although I’m not far away, there are all of these pesky trees blocking the view.  Here’s where I put the orange dude:

ge sv landing map

I figured the end of the driveway would add slight interest to the view (and this is where you’d enter if you were trying to get to my landing):

ge sv landing

You probably noticed that there’s a bridge over the Iowa River just upstream from my landing; so of course the orange dude trekked a little bit west along the highway:

ge sv iowa r map

And he looked upstream:

ge sv iowa r

As is my wont, one of the early steps in my landing process is to check out the GE Panoramio photos, not only to see if there are some pretty pictures, but also to see if something of interest pops up.  Well, here’s what I saw when I put my cursor over one of the photo icons on the east side of Tama:

ge map lh bridge

And here’s the photo (by PolarisFinder):

pano polarisfinder linc hiway

Wow.  Cool bridge, and it was built in 1915!  Great job by a talented mason!

Regular (and long-time) readers of this blog know that I’ve landed near the Lincoln Highway numerous times and featured it in a couple of posts.  (I just searched for Lincoln Highway within my posts and got nine hits).

The first time I ran across the highway was my December 29, 2008 Dugway Utah post.  Here’s what Wiki had to say in 2008 about the highway:

The Lincoln Highway was the first road across the United States of America.   The Lincoln Highway originally spanned coast-to-coast from Times Square in New York City to Lincoln Park in San Francisco through 13 states: New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, and California.

Conceived in 1912 and formally dedicated October 31, 1913, the Lincoln Highway was America’s first major memorial to President Abraham Lincoln, predating the 1922 dedication of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. by 9 years. As the first automobile road across America, the Lincoln Highway brought great prosperity to the hundreds of cities, towns and villages along the way. Affectionately, the Lincoln Highway became known as “The Main Street Across America”.

I also included this map:

800px-lh-map-75

And this: 

This shows a part of the original Lincoln Highway west of Dugway (in 1913).  Tough place to get a flat or run out of gas . . .

1913-lh-in-skull-valley

Of special interest (at least to me) is that Route 27 in New Jersey is part of the original Lincoln Highway (and also follows the colonial route between New York and Philadelphia, traversed numerous times by George Washington and his army).  It’s of special recent interest to me because for the last three or so months (and for the next six or so months), I’m commuting from my home in Central Jersey up to Newark (where our company is cleaning up the soil under an old abandoned chemical plant – mostly by digging it up and hauling it off to a landfill). 

Anyway, every day on my way home, I drive on a five or six mile stretch of Route 27 south of New Brunswick, and think thoughts like “George sure wouldn’t recognize this road today . . .”

Before leaving the Lincoln Highway, I’ll return to the orange dude on the bridge over the Iowa River.  If he looks downstream, he gets to see this:

ge sv iowa r old bridge

Besides the cool bridge and the Lincoln Highway connection, I couldn’t find anything of particular interest about Tama.  From Wiki, this about the name:

Tama is named for Taimah, the 19th century Meskwaki leader and Tama is located a few miles from the Meskwaki Settlement, Iowa’s only significant Native American community.

Moving on to the Toledo (which was named for Toledo OH).  I found this in Wiki under “Notable People:”

Norma ‘Duffy’ Lyon (1929–2011), sculptor nicknamed the “Butter Cow Lady”

Of course, she has her own Wiki entry:

Norma Duffield “Duffy” Lyon (1929 – 2011) was an American farmer and artist nicknamed The Butter Cow Lady. She was known for creating elaborate butter sculptures of cows at the Iowa State Fair from 1960 until 2006, when she retired.  She also created sculptures for other state fairs, as well as commissioned works for celebrities and politicians.

Here’s an Iowa Public Television piece on Duffy from 1993 (highly recommended viewing):

A couple of interesting Butter Cow Lady media factoids from Wiki:

Lyon appeared on To Tell the Truth in 1963, and was correctly identified as the Butter Cow Lady by the panelists.  She later appeared on Late Night with David Letterman with a cow carved from cheese.

I’ll close with a couple of GE Pano shots by PolarisFinder (the Lincoln Highway Bridge photographer).  First, this shot of a sculpture in Toledo:

pano polarisfinder2

PolarisFinder stepped back and snapped this shot:

pano polarisfinder3

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Cole Camp and Tightwad, Missouri

Posted by graywacke on January 7, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2238; A Landing A Day blog post number 666.

Dan:  Geez.  For the 8th time out of the last 22 landings (since I changed my random lat/long generator), I’ve landed in a state for at least the second time . . . MO.  This bumps my Score up a little, from 1140 to 1144.  If you care what I’m talking about (but have no clue), type Grand Rapids in the search box and check it out. 

Time for my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of Ross Creek; on to Cole Camp Creek; on to the Osage River (9th hit):

landing 3a

 

Zooming back, you can see that the Osage discharges to the Missouri (405th hit); which, of course goes on to the MM (876th hit).

landing 3b

 

Time for my Google Earth (GE) space flight in to Central Missouri.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and then hit your back button.

GE Street View coverage of my landing isn’t great, with the nearest blue line about a mile and a half away from my landing.  Note that I moved the orange dude a little southeast so he can see something besides just trees:

ge sv landing map

Here’s what the orange dude sees (which is the road one would take if one were visiting my landing spot):

ge sv landing

Moving just a little west, the highway crosses Cole Camp Creek:

ge sv cole camp ck map

And here ‘tis:

ge sv cole camp ck

So, I checked out Warsaw, the largest town near my landing (pop 2,100).  But besides the fact that the town was named for Warsaw, Poland in honor of Tadeusz Kościuszko, the Polish general who was a hero during the American Revolution and who was featured in my Kosciusko Mississippi post from July of 2009, I couldn’t find anything of further general interest for my readers.  (Phew – sorry about that long 52-word, run-on sentence . . .)

Lincoln?  Nada.  So I’m left with Cole Camp and (of course) Tightwad.  I’ll start with Cole Camp.  Wiki lets me know that there was a Civil War battle in Cole Camp.  Here are some Wiki excerpts:

In 1861, as Civil War hostilities were breaking out in earnest, the majority of the inhabitants of Benton County [which includes Warsaw and Cole Camp] were of Southern origin and sentiment; however, the German immigrants [centered in Cole Camp] and their descendants were predominantly pro-Union and anti-slavery. These formed the core of the Benton County Home Guard.

[One can only imagine the tensions in a “border” state like Missouri, where neighbors would turn on neighbors and essentially declare war on each other.]

A rebel force (numbering about 350) was gathering nearby at Warsaw and then marched from Warsaw toward Cole Camp on June 18 to attack the gathering Home Guard. A respected older citizen (and Union sympathizer), John Tyree, had witnessed the preparations of the secessionists and reported it to the officers at Cole Camp. As he returned from reporting this, he was captured by the rebel force. Some of the men recognized him from earlier in the day, surmised what he had done, tied him to a tree and shot him.

Despite Tyree’s warning, the Home Guard’s preparations were inadequate, for their troops were overrun and routed by the advancing rebels.

Home Guard casualties were heavy with at least 34 killed, 60 wounded, and 25 made prisoner. Rebel losses were around 7 killed and 25 wounded.

Former Confederate President Jefferson Davis, in his 1890 book A Short History of the Confederate States of America, claimed that 206 Union soldiers were killed and wounded, and over 100 taken prisoner.

From the town’s website:

The community was to suffer terribly during the remaining four years of war with the terrorism of the bushwhackers and guerrillas, and the armies marching back and forth through the area. This created tensions and hatred that lasted many years after the war ended in what became a divided town and county.

Amazing how time heals all wounds . . .

The German influence in Cole Camp is still strong, as evidenced by the home page of the town’s website:

cc mo

Ready for Tightwad?  Here’s an excerpt from a 2008 Washington Post article by Peter Slevin.  (Total aside:  I wonder if Peter’s parents considered naming him “Kevin?”)

TIGHTWAD, Mo. — When Ellen T. Lindsey picks up the telephone in this flyspeck town, the first question, more often than not, is “Are you a real bank?”

Lindsey, the new manager of the Tightwad Bank, assures the callers that the institution is, indeed, real.

Tightwad Bank may be quirky and unproven, but it is a genuine bank with a real charter and a real vault and a pair of real bankers in charge. For good measure, the business cards say: “Tightwad Bank. Member FDIC.”

“We’re seeking the customers with a sense of humor,” said Donald S. Higdon, 54, who opened Tightwad with his business partner in May after they grew bored with running a sober-sided bank in neighboring Kansas. “We thought the downside was limited, the possibilities were reasonable and the amount of fun was limitless.”

If the concept does not work out — this is the second attempt at making a bank called Tightwad profitable — Higdon jokes that he can turn the place into a drive-through liquor store.

“Everybody just asks where it got the name,” said shopkeeper Mark Huey, 37, whose family owns the Tightwad C Store on a main drag so short that “if there wasn’t a curve in it, you could see both city-limits signs.”

The story told by Huey and everyone else starts with a postman who coveted a watermelon. It was the early 1900s, and the mail carrier, making his rounds, made a deal with the grocer to set it aside until the end of the day. But when he returned, the melon was gone — sold to someone who agreed to pay 50 cents more.

As lore has it, the postman called the grocer a you-know-what, and the name stuck.

That was a 2008 article, but apparently the bank has survived:  here’s the GE Street View shot dated September 2014:

ge sv tightwad bank

I hope the above photo was taken on a Sunday, or else maybe the bank didn’t survive (and note the “:00” on the sign) . . . 

It’s time for a couple of GE Pano shots.  First this by mygrane, taken about 10 miles south of my landing (south of the Osage):

pano mygrane about 10 mi s

And here’s a shot of the Osage, (about 10 mi SE of my landing) by KingJimmy1120:

pano KingJimmy1120

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Talihina, Oklahoma

Posted by graywacke on January 3, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2237; A Landing A Day blog post number 665.

Dan:  My Score went up a whole point from 1139 to 1140 thanks to today’s landing in . . . OK.  No idea what I’m talking about?  Type “Grand Rapids” in the search box and check it out.  Don’t care?  Then simply continue by taking a look at my regional landing map:

landing 1

And here’s my local landing map showing a plethora of small towns (with the titular town highlighted):

landing 2

Here’s my streams-only map:

landing 3

It shows that I landed in the watershed of the Fourche Maline (1st hit ever; more about the peculiar name in a minute); on to the Poteau River (2nd hit); to the Arkansas (120th hit); to the MM (875th hit).

So what’s the story with the Fourche Maline?  Well, Fourche is the French word for “Fork,” as in the fork of a river.  Maline is from the same Latin base as malign and malignant.  In French, it means cunning or clever, but I suspect that the original name of the stream has sinister overtones.  By the way, “Poteau” is also French – it means “post.”

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) space flight.  For some reason, my GE space ship made an awkward approach to earth, looking down on Antarctica before heading in to SE Oklahoma.  Click HERE to check it out (and then hit the back button).

I have halfway decent StreetView coverage, about a mile from my landing:

ge sv landing map

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

 

There’s an unnamed tributary of the Fourche Maline near my landing (although the locals probably have a name for it).  The orange dude didn’t have to travel far to get a Street View shot:

ge sv unnamed trib

And here’s what it looks like:

ge sv ut

And of course I simply must get a look at the Fourche Maline:

ge sv fm map

And here ‘tis:

ge sv fm

Hey – if it’s big enough for a steel frame bridge, it’s big enough to qualify as a river . . .

So I spent my usual inordinate amount of time checking out all of the little towns, looking for the elusive hook.  I’ll say the hook was elusive.  In fact, I would declare the entire area:

aa-hookless

I settled on Talihina just because I like the name origin.  Wikipedia lets us know that the town was named after the Choctaw words for railroad.  In Choctaw, tully means iron and hena means road (and the original phrase got mangled into Talihina). 

As my readers know, I run across countless midwestern/western towns named after railroad executives, railroad lawyers and other miscellaneous railroad employees – typically in the town’s attempt to lure a railroad line.  I’ve also run across countless towns across the country with names based on Indian words or names.  But this is the first time I’ve run across a town with Indian & railroad roots at the same time . . .

During the spaceflight in, you may have noticed that landing 2149 was nearby:

ge landing 2149

Given the hookless nature of this landing, I thought I’d borrow a couple of little items from that January 2015 post.  First, here’s one of my favorite Street View shots of all time:

ge-sv

At the time, I said:  Grandpa and grandson had no idea that their Sardis Lake fishing trip was being immortalized by Google.  I hope that they’ve since learned about this . . .

Both 2149 and 2237 were in the Ouachita Mountains; in my 2149 post I did a little Ouachita Mountain geology:

Anyway, most geologists believe that the Ouachitas were originally part of the Appalachian mountains.  Here’s a USGS graphic; first look at the index map to see the location of the main map, and then read the words:

usgs-tapestry

OK, so I added the black lines to make the connection a little more obvious.  That orange and gray protrusion that has cut off the Ouchitas from the Appalachians contains younger coastal plain sediments more-or-less associated with the Gulf of Mexico / Mississippi River.  Well, maybe you learned a little geology . . .

Back to the here and now, I noticed many GE Panoramio photos just south of my landing:

ge pano shot map

All of these photos are associated with the Talimena State Park and more specifically, the Talimena Scenic Drive.  (By the way, search as I might I couldn’t find out where the name Talimena comes from.  It’s likely also of Choctaw origin). 

I checked ‘em all out, and found some highlights.  I’ll start with this shot of the Talimena Drive itself (by Alan Brodie):

pano alan brodie

 

I found a couple of lovely shots by PJRoos:

pano pjroos 2

pano pjroos talimena scenic drive

 

I’ll close with this sunset shot by Dallas 1959:

pano dallas 1959

 

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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LaGrange and Hawk Springs, Wyoming

Posted by graywacke on December 30, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2236; A Landing A Day blog post number 664.

Dan:  Yet another new state since I revised my random lat/long landing procedure . . . WY.  My Score has dropped from 1203 to 1139.  Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Here’s a local streams-only map, showing that I landed very close to Bear Ck, which flows into Horse Ck, and on to the North Platte River (31st hit). 

landing 3a

 

Zooming back:

landing 3b

The North Platte makes its way to the Platte (68th hit); to the Missouri (403rd hit); and, of course (although not shown) on to the MM (874 hits).

Time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to SE WY.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and then hit the back button.

It turns out I have excellent GE Street View coverage.  I expanded the map a little so you could get a good look at the bluffs east and north of my landing (more about them later):

GE sv landing map

Zooming in, note the tree:

GE sv landing map (2)

And here’s what the orange guy sees (with my landing spot very precisely located):

GE sv landing

I also checked out Bear Ck on Street View, and was able to get this lovely shot of my watershed creek about a mile upstream of my landing:

GE SV bear ck

As mentioned earlier, Bear Ck flows to Horse Ck.  Here’s a GE Panoramio shot by GilmoreGirlz of Horse Creek down near LaGrange:

pano horse creek gilmoregirlz

Speaking of LaGrange, it’s time for me to head east to check out this teeny town (pop 450).  Here’s a cool poem written by Betty Jo Mathis and posted prominently on the home page of the town’s website:

LaGrange is a village on the Wyoming plains
(A state that’s free with its wind but not with its rains.)

We’re surrounded by ranches where cowboys you’ll meet,
And farms with vast acreages and great strips of wheat.

To the west – Bear Mountain, to the North, ‘Sixty-Six’
And folks in our town are an interesting mix.

We have contractors, plumbers, guys who dig trenches,
Realtors and teachers and mechanics with wrenches.

There are guys who climb windmills and preachers – a score!
(There Is a Bible school here with students galore.)

A maintenance man sees that our town’s trim and neat,
And the clerk’s at the hall where the town fathers meet.

There’s an athletic field and a rodeo ground
And our Mini Fair is known for miles all around.

Churches, library and a post office, of course,
A nice senior center and a bar – the “Dead Horse”.

There’s a grocery store here with caf in the back
Where the hamburgers and fries are better’n Big Mac

There’s an elevator here to handle our grain
And they send out a truck to deliver Propane.

Our fire trucks, they are manned by some great volunteers
And we have trained EMTs who quiet our fears.

We have a busy tree farm and two new gas pumps.
We’re a great little town – and we’ve only two grumps!

We’re on Road 151 out here on the range
So stop in to see us – we will show you LaGrange!

I noted: “Bear Mountain to the West, to the North, Sixtysix,” and wonder what the heck Sixtysix was.  It certainly isn’t Route 66 . . .

Well, Bear Mountain was easy, as you can see it plain as day on my local landing map.  Here’s a picture of the Bear Mountain area (the bluffs to the north and east of my landing as noted earlier; (GE Panoramio shot by OEWL):

pano OEWL bear mountain-ish

After some sleuthing, I figured out that Sixtysix is also a mountain, and found it on GE:

GE mountains

I found out how Sixtysix mountain got its name.  One of two choices (from WyomingPlaces.com):

  1.  Dater and Co. owned a ranch near Horse Creek Mountainand their brand was 66.  Gradually, the name of the mountain switched from Horse Creek to SixtySix.
  2. Another story as to the origin of the name is that sixty six emigrants were trapped by Indians on the north side of the hill. All were killed but Ed Stemler. Mr. Stemler had red hair and because the Indians believed red hair was a sign from the gods he was allowed to escape.

Choice #2 is pretty damn grizzly.  It seems to me that the killing of 66 emigrants would have enough historical significance that — if it actually happened — the naming of the mountain would be confirmed.  In spite of the interesting detail about Ed Stemler, the ALAD Truth Patrol gives option 1 a 95% chance of being true . . . 

Here’s a picture of Sixtysix mountain (also from Wyoming Places):

Sixtysix Mountain

By the way, if you’re a long-time regular reader of this blog, these mountains (especially Bear Mountain) might look familiar.  That’s because of my numerous landings in western Nebraska (not at all far from here) that featured similar-looking landmark rocks like Scott’s Bluff and Chimney Rock.

Before I leave LaGrange and head north to Hawk Springs, here’s a shot of the town, on the Tentmakers Bible Mission website:

LaGrange Header tentmakers bible mission

About Hawk Springs, from Wyoming Tourism:

Located south of Torrington in Goshen County, Hawk Springs was named after saloon keeper “Black” Hawk.

Of more interest is this from Motorcycle-USA.com  “On the Road to Sturgis II” by Bryan Harley:

We stop for a quick photo shoot and encounter the self-appointed historian of a tiny town in Wyoming when we park the Victory 8-Ball in front of the Hawk Springs Trading Post, one of only three buildings in the town.

She is a sprite elderly lady in her paint-stained pants and floppy hat who was mowing dead grass in a makeshift park across the street. She lets us know that the building was once a fire department before it was a trading post, but now “some guy just lives there.” The worn-down building next to it was a movie house in the ‘20s too, she continues.

Going back to her task of mowing the sparse weathered grass, Eric, my traveling partner and Motorcycle USA’s videographer, walks into the park to ask her the population of the town and almost steps on a bull snake while wearing flip flops. She takes up arms, grabbing a spade to kill the snake in defense of “the bikers who might stop in the park.”

“Rattlesnakes are bad, too this year,” she continues, and in five minutes Eric and I have been made honorary citizens of Hawk Springs by this friendly old lady.

Here’s a picture of the Victory 8-Ball in front of the Hawk Springs Trading post:

motorcycle-usa hawk springs

The trading post is one of the three buildings in downtown Hawk Springs (photo from mapio.net):

58810870

 

I don’t think anything’s open.  Also from mapio.net is this shot:

2356020

I wonder if the shot with the car was taken after the shot without the car?

As is my wont, it’s time for some local Pano shots.  I found two by GilmoreGirlz taken about three miles east of my landing.  First this one, of cows doing a so-so job of actually staying in the shade:

pano gilmoregirlz 2

I’ll close with this lovely pastoral scene . . .

pano gilmoregirlz

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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Show Low, Arizona

Posted by graywacke on December 26, 2015

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-three-or-four days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landin above.

Landing number 2235; A Landing A Day blog post number 663.

Dan:  I landed in another new state (since I began my new random lat / long landing procedure) . . . AZ.  My Score was 1277, now it’s down to 1203.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And a somewhat-more-expanded-than-usual local landing map:

landing 2

Here’s my local streams-only map:

landing 3a

As you can see, I landed in the watershed of the Little Bonito Ck; on (predictably) to the Big Bonito Ck; to the Black River (2nd hit); to the Salt R (12th hit).

Here’s a more expanded view:

landing 3b

The Salt discharges to the Gila (36th hit); and although map doesn’t show it, the Gila kinda sorta makes its way to the Colorado (175th hit).

I had to do a little research to see why my StreetAtlas map doesn’t even bother connecting the Gila to the Colorado.  From Wiki, about the Gila R.:

Indigenous peoples have lived along the river for at least 2,000 years, establishing complex agricultural societies before European exploration of the region began in the 16th century.

During the 20th century, human development of the Gila River watershed necessitated the construction of large diversion and flood control structures on the river and its tributaries, and consequently the Gila now contributes only a small fraction of its historic flow to the Colorado.   The historic natural discharge of the river is around 1900 cfs (cubic feet per second, or 850,000 gallons per minute), and is now only 247 cfs.

I don’t think the small flow is an excuse for dropping the river course from the map . . .

I used Google Earth (GE) Street View to find a bridge over the Gila just outside Yuma AZ, near where it discharges into the Colorado.  Here’s what the once-mighty Gila looks like today:

GE SV salt - yuma

Speaking of GE Street View, the closest view I could get of one of my streams is the Salt, about 45 miles downstream from my landing.  Here’s a map showing Street View coverage, and where a bridge crosses the Salt:

GE SV black river map

Here’s a closer view, showing the crazy path of US Route 60 near the river:

GE SV black river map (2)

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

GE SV black river

 

Wow.  What a beautiful shot!  This is one of the prettiest Street View shots I’ve come across . . .

I put the orange dude a ways up the hill.  Here’s what he sees:

GE SV black river (2)

I figured that this area would have a few GE Panoramio shots.  Wow.  I’ll say it does:

GE SV black river map (3)

And as always, I did the leg work for you guys, and looked at most (if not all) of the shots.  Here are the two best.  First this shot by DieselDucy, taken from the same place as my second Street View shot:

pano DieselDucy

Nothing like low-angle sunlight to greatly enhance the photo, eh?

And here’s one by Anne C. Schmitt, from a little higher up (another great shot):

pano ACSchmitt

Oops.  I’m deep into my post, and I haven’t yet presented my GE space flight to my landing!  Well, better late than never.  Click HERE to check it out (and then hit your back button).

http://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/colbI8hxA3

Here’s an oblique GE shot, looking up my watershed valley:

GE 1 looking north

 

Mount Baldy is about 9 miles ENE of my landing.  Here’s a shot looking WSW past Mount Baldy towards my landing:

GE 2 mt baldy

Here’s a GE Pano shot by tijopics of the somewhat-less-than-dramatic summit:

pano tijopics mt baldy

And a little information about Mt. Baldy, obtained by a right click on GE:

Mount Baldy is the second highest point in the state after the six summits of the San Francisco Peaks near Flagstaff. With a summit 11,420 feet above sea level, the peak of Mount Baldy rises above the tree line and is left largely bare of vegetation, lending the mountain its current name.  Mount Baldy is one of the most sacred mountains to the Apache of Arizona.

Back to my landing, here’s as close as I can get (about 9 miles away) for Street View coverage:

GE SV landing map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

GE SV landing

Evidently, the GoogleCam driver decided that he wasn’t going on a dirt road!

So anyway – I’ll finally get around to my local landing map, which I’ll let you see one more time:

landing 2

As you can see, there are numerous little towns, and it was a bit of a stretch for me to travel all the way out to Show Low to be my titular town.  Obviously, I checked out all of the closer-in towns, and could find no hook.

But Show Low?  There must be a hook in that name  . . .

FamilySearch.org had the best discussion of how the town got its name:

Two men laid claim to the land around what is now Show Low:  Martin Clark and Corydon Cooley.  They realized they could not be partners, so decided to peaceably settle their dispute with a winner-take-all card game.

They agreed to play a card game of “seven-up” to decide which one would move. When the last hand was dealt, Clark ran his cards and said “show low and you win.”. Cooley threw down his hand containing the deuce of clubs, and was declared the winner.

I checked out the rules for seven-up, and a point is scored for the person with lowest trump card in his hand (the trump suit is different for each hand played).  Evidently clubs were trump, and Cooley had the two.  It must have been a close game, and one point made all the difference . . .

But check this out.  Here’s a Google Map view of “downtown” Show Low:

GM - deuce of clubs

Yes, the main drag in town is Deuce of Clubs Avenue!  And, they have a statue commemorating the epic card game (GE Pano shot by cberry):

pano cberry

Time for some Pano shots near my landing.  Yes, there is skiing in Arizona!  This shot (by BLilley) is of Sunrise Ski Park (just north of Mt. Baldy):

pano blilley

Here’s a shot near the summit of Mt. Baldy by Cobweb1:

pano cobweb1 mt baldy

I’ll close with this lovely shot (by tijopics) of  Hawley Lake, about 10 miles north of my landing:

pano tijopics hawley lake 10 mi N

Doesn’t seem like Arizona, does it?

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2015 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

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