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Ohio City and Pitkin, Colorado

Posted by graywacke on January 12, 2017

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2319; A Landing A Day blog post number 750.

the-boxDan:  As opposed to my last two borderline landings, today’s lat/long (38o 37.319’N, 106o 37.438’W) puts me squarely in Colorado:

landing-1

My local landing map shows that I landed close to two teeny towns (for reference, Ohio and Pitkin are only about 6 miles apart):

landing-2

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of an unnamed stream, on to Gold Creek, on to Quartz Creek, on to Tomichi Creek:

landing-3a

Zooming back, you can see that the Tomichi flows to the Gunnison River (6th hit); on to the Colorado (177th hit):

landing-3b

Here are a couple of shots of Tomichi Creek, from a real estate website (MirRanchGroup.com):

tomichi-creek-ranch-2014-2-1024x512

tomichi-creek-ranch-colorado-ranches-for-sale-main-1024x512

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to Central Colorado.  Click HERE, enjoy the flight, and hit your back button.

Here’s an oblique GE view looking north past my landing up the valley of the unnamed stream towards the Sawatch Range:

ge1

I don’t have any kind of GE Street View coverage of my landing, but I can get a view of Quartz Creek (notice the GE SV Cam didn’t make it to Ohio City, let along Pitkin):

ge-sv-quartz-map

And here’s what the Orange Dude sees:

ge-sv-quartz

You might have noticed that my local landing map says “Ohio,” but GE says “Ohio City.”   A quick perusal of the internet confirms “Ohio City.”

From Wiki:

In 1879, a prospector, miner, and assayer named Jacob Hess discovered silver in Ohio Creek, now known as Gold Creek.  He moved his camp to Ohio Creek and named his settlement Eagle City.

So, Gold Creek used to be Ohio Creek, and Ohio City used to be Eagle City.  But why, if Jacob Hess discovered silver, was Ohio Creek renamed Gold Creek? 

Mystery solved.  From UncoverColorado.com/ghost-towns:

Ohio City was founded in the early 1860’s as a gold mining town.

[So now, the name “Gold Creek” makes sense!  Before it was a silver mining town, it was a gold mining town!]

After gold ran out, people left. The Colorado Silver Boom of 1879 brought miners back into the area. A large vein was found and Ohio City was reborn.

[They could’ve renamed Gold Creek to Silver Creek . . .]

After the Silver Boom collapse in 1893, folks left town once again.

[But guess what?]

Prospectors came back in 1896 and found the lode that was the source for the gold found in the ’60s. Mining continued until around 1916 when profits dried up.

Here are some Ohio City pics from the UncoverColorado website:

2012-10-08-ohio-city04

2012-10-08-ohio-city15

And then this shot, just coming into town:

2012-10-08-ohio-city13

Moving on to Pitkin.  There’s even less here than in Ohio City, although it’s a much bigger town, pop 66.  (OK, so I don’t know how many people live in Ohio City, but trust me, it’s way less than 66.)

From Wiki:

Pitkin was founded in 1879, and is said to be Colorado’s first mining camp west of the Continental Divide

[It must have beat Ohio City by a couple of weeks.]

Originally named Quartzville, it was renamed to honor Governor Frederick W. Pitkin.

So, Ohio City was on Ohio Creek (renamed Gold Creek), and Quartzville was on Quartz Creek (which remains Quartz Creek). 

I’m a geologist, and I’m generally aware that gold is often found associated with quartz.  I’d say by the names of the two creeks that meet at Ohio City, the old time miners were very aware of this connection. 

Before digging a little deeper (like the miners) into the quartz/gold connection, here are some Pitkin photos from UncoverColorado, starting with this “Welcome to Pitkin” shot, coming into town on a dirt road with a 15 mph speed limit:

2012-10-08-pitkin06

2012-10-08-pitkin18

2012-10-08-pitkin24

(I think the architect of the above was also responsible for the town hall in Ohio City.)

So, it’s time for a little geology as to the quartz/gold connection. First, here’s a picture of gold in quartz from SpecimenGold.com:

dscn0789

And another, from GoldRushNuggets.com:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So why are the two minerals found together?  Well, I happened upon TreasureNet.com, which has a question and answer forum.  Cappy Z. had a question (here are some excerpts):

It is no secret that veins of white quartz have gold seams.  Since gold in quartz is so prevalent does the quartz have some ability to attract gold when molten?  Kind of like a magic wand attracting the iron filings in that kids game?

So, 3XFlyFisher had an answer (somewhat edited by yours truly):

The deposition of gold and gold bearing minerals are hydrothermal in nature. This means that the gold is carried in a molton solution associated with volcanic activity. As the solution and the surrounding host rock begin to cool the gold precipitates in the host rock.

There are temperature-pressure relationships that have been developed that show quartz and gold are deposited/precipitated at nearly the same temperatures and pressures.  Thus, as the solution cools, both quartz and gold come out of solution together.  Therefore, quartz does not “attract” gold, but generally this is how gold is deposited with quartz in volcanic host rocks.

What the heck – I’ll finish up this segment with a picture of a cool piece of natural quartz/gold jewelry (from AlaskaJewelry.com):

rm773qw

It’s time for some GE Pano shots (all within 5 miles of my landing). Here’s one by TexasFlyFisher, overlooking Quartz Creek:

pano-texasflyfisher

And this, of a funky old miner’s shack door, by Tyson Woodul:

pano-tyson-woodul

And this, by GregArizona of Fossil Ridge, just west of my landing:

pano-gregarizona

I’ll close with another shot of the ridge, by Josh Laubhan:

pano-josh-laubhan

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Levelland and Needmore, Texas

Posted by graywacke on January 6, 2017

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2318; A Landing A Day blog post number 749.

untitledDan:  Today’s lat/long (33o 28.047’N, 103o 1.395’W) puts me right on the border between New Mexico & Texas, but evidently in Texas based on the title of this post:

landing-1a

Note:  In the post before this one, I used the same terminology in the first paragraph as follows: “ . . . puts me right on the border between Florida & Georgia, but evidently in Georgia based on the title of this post.”

A closer look confirms my Texas landing:

landing-1b

And here’s my local landing map:

landing-2

You can see a VP* of small towns; my reasons for selecting Levelland and Needmore as titular will become apparent shortly.

*veritable plethora

But first, it’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to West Texas.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

Street View coverage is a couple of miles away, but I’ll take it:

ge-sv-landing-map

And here’s what the Orange Dude sees:

ge-sv-landing

My streams-only StreetAtlas map was worthless, so I had to go to GE to track downhill topography, and therefore the flowpath for water. 

I found it went generally southeast, but I had to go an incredible distance to find a well defined channel, and even further to find my first bridge with Street View Coverage:

ge-sv-colorado-map

The 167.66 miles is the length of the yellow line to the yellow pin which is where I put the Orange Dude.  I’m sure that this is the longest I’ve had the Orange Dude travel to get a first look at one of my watershed streams!  And here’s what he sees:

ge-sv-colorado

Being in Texas, I was confident that there would be an informational sign at the end of the bridge.  And there was (at one end only, but I’ll take it):

ge-sv-colorado-2

OK, so I landed in the watershed of the Colorado River (29th hit).  And just to confirm that the Colorado Watershed extends into New Mexico, here’s a watershed map from Wiki:

800px-coloradotexas_watershed

Obviously, I spent some time checking out each and every little town out here in West Texas.  But at the end of the day, the two towns with the most interesting names caught my attention:  Levelland (of course, pronounced “level land”) and Needmore (of course, pronounced “need more.”)

Wiki tells us this about Levelland:

Levelland is famous as the site of a well-publicized series of UFO sightings in November 1957.

Several motorists driving on various highways around Levelland claimed to see a large, egg-shaped object which emitted a blue glow and caused their automobiles to shut off.

In most cases, the object was sitting either on the highway or close to it. When the object took off, witnesses claimed their vehicles would restart and work normally.

Among witnesses were Weir Clem, Levelland’s sheriff, and Ray Jones, the town’s fire chief.

The United States Air Force concluded a severe electrical storm (most probably ball lightning), was the major cause for the sightings and reported auto failures.

However, several prominent UFO researchers, among them Dr. James E. McDonald, a physicist at the University of Arizona, and Dr. J. Allen Hynek, an astronomer at Northwestern University, disputed this explanation. Both men argued that no electrical storm was in the area when the sightings occurred.

Wow.  There’s a Wiki article on the UFO sightings, and it’s pretty amazing stuff.  It’s a little too long, and highlights don’t do it justice.  I highly recommend that you read it by clicking HERE.

Alternately, simply Google “Levelland UFO” and you can peruse quite a few articles at your leisure. Really interesting reading.

Moving right along.  The Levelland TX Wiki article also mentioned that a singer named James McMurtry recorded a song about the town, appropriately entitled “Levelland.”  For the record, James McMurtry is the son of famous Texas novelist Larry McMurtry, author of the well known novel Lonesome Dove, which spawned a TV mini-series of the same name.

Well, here we go.  ALAD Nation!  I love this song!  If you like good ol’ straight ahead story-telling back beat country rock ‘n roll (which is my sweet spot), this song is for you.  I highly recommend that you listen to it twice.  Once, following the words, and then, enjoying the video. 

And if you’re like me, you’ll be listening again and again.  In fact, I just bought tickets to see James McMurtry in concert in Alexandria VA . . .

Flatter than a tabletop
Makes you wonder why they stopped here
Wagon must have lost a wheel or they lacked ambition one
In the great migration west
Separated from the rest
Though they might have tried their best
They never caught the sun
So they sunk some roots down in this dirt
To keep from blowin’ off the earth
Built a town around here
And when the dust had all but cleared
They called it Levelland, the pride of man
In Levelland.
Granddad grew the dryland wheat
Stood on his own two feet
His mind got incomplete and they put in the home
Daddy’s cotton grows so high
Sucks the water table dry
As rolling sprinklers circle by
Bleedin’ it to the bone
And I won’t be here when it comes a day
It all dries up and blows away
I’d hang around just to see
But they never had much use for me in Levelland, Levelland
They don’t understand me out in Levelland, Levelland
And I watch those jet trails carving up that big blue sky
Coast to coasters – watch ’em go
And I never would blame ’em one damn bit
If they never looked down on this
Not much down here they’d wanna know
Just Levelland
Far as you can point your hand
Nothin’ but Levelland
Mama used to roll her hair
Back before the central air
We’d sit outside and watch the stars at night
She’d tell me to make a wish
I’d wish we both could fly
Don’t think she’s seen the sky
Since we got the satellite dish and
I can hear the marching band
Doin’ the best they can
They’re playing “Smoke on the Water”, “Joy to the World”
I’ve paid off all my debts
Got some change left over yet and I’m
Gettin’ on a whisper jet
I’m gonna fly as far as I can get from
Levelland, doin’ the best I can
Out in Levelland

Time to move on to Needmore.  Let me start with the fact that besides the fact that we’re in Texas oil country, we’re also in Texas cotton country (as sung about by James McMurtry).

The modern cotton industry started with Eli Whitney’s cotton gin.  What’s a cotton gin?  Very briefly, from Wiki:

A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibers from their seeds, allowing for much greater productivity than manual cotton separation.

Prior to the introduction of the mechanical cotton gin, cotton had required considerable labor to clean and separate the fibers from the seeds.  With Eli Whitney’s introduction of “teeth” in his cotton gin to comb out the cotton and separate the seeds, cotton became a tremendously profitable business, creating many fortunes in the Antebellum South.

The invention of the cotton gin caused massive growth in the production of cotton in the southern United States. Cotton production expanded from 750,000 bales in 1830 to 2.85 million bales in 1850. As a result, the region became even more dependent on plantations and slavery.

While it took a single slave about ten hours to separate a single pound of fiber from the seeds, a team of two or three slaves using a cotton gin could produce around fifty pounds of cotton in just one day.

The number of slaves rose in concert with the increase in cotton production, increasing from around 700,000 in 1790 to around 3.2 million in 1850.  By 1860, black slave labor from the American South was providing two-thirds of the world’s supply of cotton.

The cotton gin thus “transformed cotton as a crop and the American South into the globe’s first agricultural powerhouse, and – according to many historians – was the start of the Industrial Revolution.

According to the Eli Whitney Museum website:

Whitney (who died in 1825) could not have foreseen the ways in which his invention would change society for the worse. The most significant of these was the growth of slavery. While it was true that the cotton gin reduced the labor of removing seeds, it did not reduce the need for slaves to grow and pick the cotton.

In fact, the opposite occurred. Cotton growing became so profitable for the planters that it greatly increased their demand for both land and slave labor. In 1790 there were six slave states; in 1860 there were 15.

From 1790 until Congress banned the importation of slaves from Africa in 1808, Southerners imported 80,000 Africans. By 1860 approximately one in three Southerners was a slave.

Because of its inadvertent effect on American slavery, and on its ensuring that the South’s economy developed in the direction of plantation-based agriculture (while encouraging the growth of the textile industry elsewhere, such as in the North), the invention of the cotton gin is frequently cited as one of the indirect causes of the American Civil War.

I learned something here.  You?  And I didn’t realize that the import of slaves was banned in 1808, but it’s absolutely true. 

Anyway, so, why am I going on and on about cotton gins?  Well, I really enjoy a good gin & tonic.  So, I’ll close with this GE StreetView shot of downtown Needmore:

ge-sv-needmore-gin

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Moniac and Saint George, Georgia

Posted by graywacke on January 1, 2017

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2317; A Landing A Day blog post number 748.

text-boxDan:  Today’s lat/long (43o 26.229’N, 96o 34.897’W) puts me right on the border between Florida & Georgia, but evidently in Georgia based on the title of this post:

landing-1a

A closer look confirms my Georgia landing, right in that peculiar southern bulge in the southeastern corner of Georgia:

landing-1b

Here’s my local landing map:

landing-2

I’ll back out a little for another look, showing I’m not far from Jacksonville:

landing-2b

My watershed analysis is straightforward.  I landed right next to the St. Mary’s River, which discharges to the Atlantic Ocean:

landing-3

Because I’ll be discussing the Okefenokee Swamp in a little bit, I added the Suwanee River, which drains most of the swamp.  St. Mary’s drains just a little.

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight into the “Georgia Bend,” as the southern bulge is known.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

I have pretty good Street View coverage of my landing:

ge-sv-landing-map

And here’s what the Orange Dude sees:

ge-sv-landing

I don’t have to go far to get a look at the St. Mary’s River:

ge-sv-st-marys-map

And here ‘tis:

ge-sv-st-marys

So of course I went to Wiki to check out the towns of Moniac and Saint George.  I’ll start with teeny Moniac. 

Moniac is an unincorporated community along the St. Marys River, part of the “Georgia Bend” (the “tail” of Georgia that sticks further south than the rest of the state).  The area was an early trading post in the 1820s; the settlement’s name comes from an Indian chief whose entrance trail to the Okefenokee Swamp passed near by.

The population in 1904 was estimated to be 400.  According to the 1910 census, the population was 184.

Pretty funny.  Wiki says nothing about the population after 1910.  If I were to draw a graph of population vs. time and extend the line, the population went to zero a long, long time ago.

Here’s a GE shot of today’s downtown Moniac:

ge-moniac

I’d say that zero population estimate looks about right . . .

One other thing.  I found an article by Lois Barefoot Mays in CharltonCountyArchives.org that disputes Wiki on how the town got its name:

Charlton County’s 1972 history book states that the town of Moniac got its name from a prominent Indian chief whose trail of entrance to the Swamp passed that way. Since then, printed documents have been found that show that Moniac was in fact named for a man who probably never came near this territory.  He was David Moniac, a Creek Indian.

Moniac was a West Point graduate from southern Alabama who fought with the U.S. Infantry in the Indian War (aka the Florida War or the Seminole War) of 1836.

David Moniac was the first Indian to be admitted to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He received the appointment to West Point in 1817 (at age 15).  He graduated as a 2nd Lt. In July 1822.

He was killed in Florida, after achieving the rank of Major.  He was leading a regiment of Creek Indians against the Seminoles (the enemy tribe in the Florida War).

Way to go, Ms. L. Barefoot Mays, for correcting the record.  Could you please dive into Wiki and make appropriate changes?  I’m totally with you.

One more thing about Moniac.  Here’s a historical marker:

6898886173_354b56aafa_z

So a surveyor (Andrew Ellicott) built a mound marking the east end of the straight-line border between the US and Spanish Florida.  According to a treaty between the US & Spain, the line was to run from the confluence of the Flint & Chattahoochee Rivers, extending east southeast to a point marking the headwaters of the St. Mary’s River (which is where Mr. Ellicott placed his famous mound).

Here’s a GE shot showing the Mound’s location:

ge-ellicott2

And a map showing the western end of the line:

survey1

And the eastern end of the line (at Ellicott’s Mound):

survey2

So, Mr. Ellicott canoed/trekked up the St. Mary’s and built a mound of earth at the only dry location he could find in the general vicinity of the headwaters of the river.  He designated this as the eastern end of the survey line.

He then marked out a straight line, running approximately 158 miles:

ellicotts-line

Imagine doing this in 1800!  Dense forests everywhere; no roads, no modern surveying instruments (let alone GPS!).  He really knew his astronomy, and used the stars to determine his location.  But I can imagine starting at one end, and then being a few thousand feet too far north when you reached the other!  But no.  He nailed it.

By the way, Andrew Ellicott had quite the resume:

  • He completed the unfinished Mason-Dixon line
  • He surveyed the limits and street plans for Washington DC
  • Performed a topographical survey of the Niagara River and Niagara Falls
  • Plotted a road from Reading PA to Erie PA (a straight line distance of 250 miles). For those of you who (like me) are familiar with the ridges of central Pennsylvania, you realize the difficulty of this task (think about the PA Turnpike and all of the tunnels).
  • Surveyed the boundary between Alabama and Florida (the 31st parallel).
  • Surveyed the boundary between Georgia and North Carolina, which was in dispute.

Time to move on to Saint George.

Saint George has very little internet presence (aka, it’s hookless).

Of some (but not much) interest is the Wiki-noted fact that St. George has the southern-most post office in Georgia and that St. George Elementary is the southernmost school in Georgia.

From VanishingSouthGeorgia.com, this photograph by Brian Brown is of the afore-mentioned southern-most elementary school:

st-george-elementary-school-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2012

Hard to argue with the sentiment (although in our current political climate, I often wonder).

(Never fear, ALAD Nation!  I will not – I repeat – will not – begin talking politics!)

Anyway, I was curious about the name “Saint George” (Wiki has nothing to say on the king_george_iisubject).  After all, the State of Georgia was named after King Georgia II, hardly a Saint (king of England from 1727 to 1760).  He was quite the fru-fru dude (as shown to the right).  He hardly looks saintly!

There’s a Saint George, Utah, but that was named after Mormon Apostle George A. Smith.  George was Joseph Smith’s nephew and (according to the Mormon hierarchy) is one of 13 Apostles who preside below the Mormon top gun aka the Prophet aka the President.  This hierarchical structure is present to this day.  Anyway, during George Smith’s time, the Prophet was Brigham Young.  I don’t believe that the Mormons typically bequeath sainthood on their leadership . . .

But there is an actual Saint George, who I assume the town of Saint George, Georgia was named after.  From Wiki:

Saint George; AD 278 to 303); according to legend, was a Roman soldier of Greek origin and officer in the Guard of Roman emperor Diocletian.  Diocletian ordered his death for failing to recant his Christian faith.  As a Christian martyr, he later became one of the most venerated saints in Christianity.

Saint George is the patron saint of England. His cross forms the national flag of England, and features within the Union Jack of the United Kingdom.

During my internet perusing, I came across the fact that the settlers of the Georgia Bend region were overwhelmingly of British origins (although I can’t find the reference now); so it’s the official ALAD position that Saint George was named after Saint George.

I came across VanishingSouthGeorgia.com, and this photo by Brian Brown of a house in Saint George:

st-george-ga-vernacular-house-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2013

It was identified as a “great example of so-called Cracker-style architecture” common in Northern Florida and Southern Georgia. 

This definitely rang a bell for me, so a quick ALAD search took me to my Bronson, Florida post, which contained this picture of a strikingly-similar house:

old-cracker-house-from-bronson-post

From my earlier post:

This picture was labeled “Classic Cracker House.”  My only knowledge of the term “cracker” is that it is a derogatory term applied to southern whites (mostly poor, I assume).  But I did a little research.  From Wiki (under “Florida Cracker Architecture”):

Florida cracker architecture is a style of woodframe home used fairly commonly in the 19th century, and still popular with some developers as a source of design themes. Florida cracker homes are characterized by metal roofs, raised floors, large porch areas (often wrapping around the entire home), and straight central hallways from the front to the back of the home (sometimes called “dog trot” or “shotgun” hallways).

Then I looked at the Wiki entry for “Florida Cracker.”  Here are some excerpts:

The term “cracker” was in use during the Elizabethan era to describe braggarts.  The use of the word is documented in William Shakespeare’s King John (1595): “What cracker is this … that deafens our ears with this abundance of superfluous breath?”

By the 1760s the English, both at home and in the American colonies, applied the term “cracker” to Scots-Irish and English American settlers of the remote southern back country, as noted in a letter to the Earl of Dartmouth: “I should explain to your Lordship what is meant by Crackers; a name they have got from being great boasters; they are a lawless set of rascals on the frontiers of Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia.

Among some Floridians, the term is often used as a proud or jocular self-description. Since the huge influx of new residents (mostly northerners) into Florida in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the term “Florida Cracker” is used informally by some Floridians to indicate that their families have lived in the state for many generations. It is considered a source of pride to be descended from “frontier people who did not just live but flourished in a time before air conditioning, mosquito repellent, and screens.”

Other Floridians (and white southerners in general) find the term highly offensive and insulting.

Well!  I certainly learned something . . .

Back to now.  Also by Brian Brown (the fellow who took the picture of the Cracker house in St. George) is this shot of the St. Mary’s River:

st-marys-river-railroad-trestle-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2013

Speaking of the St. Mary’s, here’s a Wiki map:

stmarysflrivermap

Interesting that the river stops exactly at Ellicott’s Mound, eh?

From Wiki about the river:

The Saint Marys River (sometimes misspelled as St. Mary’s River) is a 126-mile-long river that forms a portion of the border between Georgia and Florida.   It is named after the Irish Saint Mary.

Now wait a minute!  “Misspelled as St. Mary’s River?!?”  You may have noticed that I have been consistently “misspelling” St. Marys as “St. Mary’s” throughout the post At least “St. Mary’s River” is grammatically correct!  For the record, my ALAD spreadsheet calls the river St. Mary’s!  And I will belligerently continue my misspelling ways.

So how about the Okefenokee Swamp?  I’ve featured it before, but thought that this time, I’d be a little more geologic.

From Wiki:

The Okefenokee was formed over the past 6,500 years by the accumulation of peat in a shallow basin on the edge of an ancient Atlantic coastal terrace, the geological relic of a Pleistocene estuary. The swamp is bordered by Trail Ridge, a strip of elevated land believed to have formed as coastal dunes or an offshore barrier island.

This is just the kind of geologic mumbo jumbo that gives my science a bad name!  I don’t even know what they’re talking about!  (Oh alright, so maybe I have a clue, but the wording is way too obtuse). 

So, peat (an accumulation of decaying vegetation) accumulated in a shallow basin over the past 6,500 years.  But the rest?  I need to understand it a little better, and pass the information along to my readers.

I found an on-line book:  “A Tide-swept Coast of Sand and Marsh: Coastal Geology and Ecology of Georgia” by Miles O. Hayes, Jacqueline Michel.

In the book, I garnered the following information:

The swamp formed in a low area landward (to the west of) a sandy ridge that is the remnants of an ancient barrier island system that was deposited when sea level was much higher than today.  This former barrier island is today called the Trail Ridge.  The Ridge is composed of sand and trends north-south:

trail-ridge-map

The barrier island was deposited some time between 1.0 and 1.7 million years ago when sea level was as much as 95-100 feet higher than today. 

The swamp is underlain by a vast deposit of peat, composed of >70% organic matter.  After a period of weathering, this organic material becomes a waxy brown mass with the consistency of peanut butter.  The peat accumulated over a period as long as 1 million years. (A little more than Wiki’s 6,500 years, eh?)

These deposits have been studied extensively by geologists, because its origin is likely similar to the origin of the extensive coal beds found throughout the world.

This got me thinking.  Back in the Carboniferous era (spanning 60 million years, from 360 million years ago until 300 million years ago), incredible thicknesses of coal deposits were laid down all over the world.  Ergo, the name “Carboniferous.”  And essentially all of the world’s coal is the same age.  Why is that?  Why aren’t there younger coal beds? 

Well, I found a post by science blogger Robert Drulwish (on NationalGeographic.com) entitled “The Fantastically Strange Origin of Most Coal on Earth.” This is a great post, and definitely worth the read!  He answers all of my questions about the origin of the world’s coal beds (and will answer yours as well, I’m sure)!  Click HERE.  Please.

If you refuse to so click, I’ll at least tell you this:  It turns out that the Carboniferous was a wet warm era with lots of treeish plants that grew quickly and died young (thus allowing for large accumulations of organic detritus).  But more importantly, the strain of bacteria that today breaks down organic matter was absent!  These bacteria have been present ever since 300 million years ago, and effectively nearly eliminate extensive accumulations of dead plant matter.  How about that . . . 

I’ll close with a couple of GE Panoramio shots of the St. Mary’s River.  First this, by MappyB:

pano-mappyb

And then this, by Mr. IPhone Tommy:

pano-mriphonetommy-st-marys

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Granite and Larchwood, Iowa

Posted by graywacke on December 27, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2316; A Landing A Day blog post number 747.

untitledDan:  Today’s lat/long (43o 26.229’N, 96o 34.897’W) puts me in far northwest Iowa:

landing-1

My local landing shows two highlights:  one of my titular towns (where’s Granite?) and something called “Gutchie Manitou State Monument Park.”  Without going into any detail, I will say right now that “Gutchie” is a typo.  It’s actually “Gitchie,” as in “by the shores of Gitche Gumee.”  More later.  Anyway, here ‘tis:

landing-2

My streams-only map is very simple:

landing-3

This was my 6th landing in the Big Sioux watershed (my latest was only 6 landings ago); on to the Missouri (417th hit); and, of course, to the MM (904th).

It’s time for that fan-favorite, my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight to extreme NW Iowa.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

I managed to get the Orange Dude to within about three quarters of a mile from my landing:

ge-sv-landing-map

And here’s what he sees:

ge-sv-landing

A Street View-enabled bridge over the Big Sioux is quite close:

ge-sv-river-map

And the OD sees this lovely view:

ge-sv-river

Before I go to all things Gitchie (aka Gitche), here’s a GE shot showing a particular Panoramio shot as well as the “town” of Granite:

ge1

In the above shot, my cursor was on a particular Panoramio photo, which is how I discovered the existence of “Good Earth State Park,” and the more mysterious “Blood Run.”

Blood Run is a stream in Iowa about 2 miles north of my landing (that of course discharges to the Big Sioux).  According to Wiki, the stream is named for the red soil (and presumably the red clay that is suspended in the stream, turning it red).  “Run” is a midwestern term for a small stream.

But more importantly, Blood Run is the name of an archaeological site that spans the Big Sioux in the vicinity of the Run.  From Wiki:

The Blood Run Site was continuously populated for 8,500 years, and contains earthwork structures built by the Oneota Culture and occupied by descendant tribes.

Now, wait a second, take a deep breath and think about 8,500 years of continuous occupation.  Here in the U.S., anything that’s 200 years old is mighty old to us.  In Europe, 1000 years is old, 2000 years (Roman) is ancient.  In Egypt, we can go back 5,000 years.  So, 8,500 years is nothing to sneeze at. 

Figuring 20 years/generation, that’s 425 generations of Indians who lived there!

Back to Wiki:

Although declared a National Historic Landmark in 1970, its integrity is endangered by gravel quarrying and looting.  The site was substantially looted and areas wholly destroyed by settlers and looters through the late 1930s and by subsequent generations of collectors. A possible snake mound rivaling the Serpent Mound in Ohio was used for railroad fill.

Blood Run was mapped in the early 18th century by French explorers and about 480 mounds existed and a population of 10,000 Native people was documented.  In the late 19th century, 176 mounds were still visible. Today 78 mounds still exist, mostly burial.

And prior to the early 18th century census, there might have been 100,000 people living here before small pox swept through.  And then after the census?  Likely down to a 1,000 thanks to disease and war.  OK, so I made up the numbers, but they’re probably not that far off . . .

Anyway, the Blood Run Site is currently protected by two State Parks:  Good Earth in SD, and Gitchie Manitou in Iowa.

When I was meandering around GE, I happened to notice a peculiar bit of dead-end-out-in-the-middle-of-nowhere Street View coverage over by Good Earth Park.  So I sent the Orange Dude over to check it out:

ge-sv-good-earth-map

It’s little more than a mowed path in a field:

ge-sv-good-earth

And then I stumbled on a young couple, apparently out for a walk (although it looks like the gentleman may be doing something on his handheld device):

ge-sv-good-earth-2

I scrolled (strolled?) past the couple, and was amazed that they seemed oblivious to the GoogleCamMobile.  I made a quick video, which you can access HERE.

I mean, really!  If I were standing out in the middle of a field, and a car came by with a peculiar attachment sticking up out of the roof, I’d at least pay attention.  If I realized it was a GoogleCamMobile, I’d be jumping up and down waving.  But then, I’m a dork. . .

Amazing, isn’t it, that the GoogleCamMobile driver actually shot a Street View video here?

An excellent photographer (Mike Oistad) took quite the series of photos in the park.  They’re not of particular archealogical interest, so I’ll save ‘em for the end of the post.

You may have noted the town of Granite in my GE shot from a ways back.  It’s just a couple of miles north of my landing.  Here’s a GE close-up:

ge-granite

The hot spot in Granite is Ed & Ruth Hansen’s General Store.  Here’ a Pano shot by SShultz:

pano-sshult-ed-and-ruth-hansens-general-store

I like the landscaping (the little tree out front).  In a few decades, it’ll be a little more impressive.

So what about the name Granite?  Well, I’m not intimately familiar with Iowa bedrock geology, but I really didn’t expect granite to be anywhere around here.  Just to double check, I took a look at an Iowa geologic map (Wiki, Bill Whittaker):

1024px-iowabedrock

Granite is typically very old rock, since it is magma that cools very slowly far down in the earth’s crust, and then takes a long time before it’s uplifted and exposed (typically hundreds of millions, if not billions of years).  Well, way up in the northwest corner of Iowa, note that it says “Precambrian.”  This is a catch-all term for any rocks older than about 600 million years.  (All of the other rocks in Iowa are younger.)

With a little more research, I discovered that the bedrock in the far northwestern corner of Iowa is known as the Sioux Quartzite, which is a layered, pink and whitish rock commonly used as a building stone in the general area.

Generically speaking, a quartzite is a quartz-rich metamorphic rock (typically an ancient sandstone that got squished and melted through the eons).  Geologically speaking, it’s not a granite at all, but lay people often call “granite” anything that isn’t a limestone, sandstone, shale or marble – i.e., any igneous rock or any metamorphic rock that looks igneous.

Just go shopping for “granite” counter tops and you’ll see what I mean!

Anyway, I found this picture in a July 2013 SouthDakotaMagazine.com article by Christian Begeman, where he extols the beauty of Sioux Quartzite (the picture shows the banks of the Big Sioux River):

christian-begeman-big-sioux-dells-2013-5

The Gitchie Manitou State Preserve is located in the NW Iowa outcrop area of the Sioux Quartzite and has its own Wiki page:

Gitchie Manitou is a small (91 acre) nature preserve in Lyon County, in the extreme northwestern corner of Iowa just northwest of Granite, Iowa, or just southeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. This natural prairie preserve is noted for its ancient Native American burial mounds and Precambrian Sioux Quartzite outcroppings, which are about 1.6 billion years old.  The smooth, pink-colored bedrock is the oldest exposed rock in the state.

The parcel was formally dedicated as a geological, archaeological, historical, and biological preserve in 1969. The preserve was named for the creator spirit in Anishinaabe Indian tradition, Gichi-Manidoo (literally “Great Spirit” or “Great Force of Nature”).

Given that Lake Superior is known as Gitche Gumee, it’s pretty obvious that gitche = gitchie = great.

Not only did Mike Oistad take pictures of the Good Earth State Park, he also took pictures at Gitchie Manitou.  Here are some of his classy Panoramio shots:

WE INTERRUPT OUR REGULAR BLOGGING FOR THIS BREAKING NEWS STORY!!!  AT APPROXIMATELY NOON ON DECEMBER 6, 2016, I WAS UNABLE TO DOWNLOAD GOOGLE EARTH PANORAMIO PHOTOS!  AND YES – GOOGLE EARTH HAS SHUT DOWN PANORAMIO!!!  THE ICONS REMAIN ON THE MAP, BUT WHEN YOU CLICK ON ONE, ALL YOU SEE IS A BLANK SPACE WHERE THE PICTURE SHOULD BE.

THIS IS TRAGIC NEWS!  COUNTLESS BLOGGERS (ESPECIALLY ONE GREG HILL OF A LANDING A DAY FAME) HAVE RELIED ON PANORAMIO PHOTOS FOR YEARS AND YEARS, HUNDREDS OF POSTS, AND THOUSANDS OF PANORAMIO PHOTOS.

Here’s a screen shot I took after searching this subject on today’s (Dec 6) Google News:

ge-panoramio-shut-down-google-news

However, with some finesse, I was able to do a Google search for Panoramio photos by Mike Oistad (not through Google Earth) and was able to download many of his wonderful shots of my landing vicinity.  However, a warning popped up letting me know that Panoramio was shutting down, so this was a temporary work around. 

His photos are great, and I’ll present a veritable Oistad feast to close out this post.

My other titular town actually appeared on my local landing map:  Larchwood.  It’s pretty much hookless, but Wiki did have this to say:

Larchwood (pop 866) was founded about 1872 by Illinois land developers Jesse Fell and Charles Holder.

.Fell was a close friend of Abraham Lincoln, and persuaded Lincoln to write his famous autography.  He also persuaded Lincoln to challenge his presidential opponent, Stephen A. Douglas to what would become the historically famous series of debates.  He was nationally known for his love of trees.

In the summer of 1869 Fell traveled to northwestern Iowa and selected a tract of about forty sections, more than 25,000 acres of land. Fell wrote, “I have never beheld such a large body of surpassingly beautiful prairie as is here to be found. There is absolutely no waste of land, and scarce a quarter of a section not affording an admirable building site.”

Holder then entered the land. Larchwood was established at the center of their holdings. Fell frequently visited the site and in May 0f 1873 personally supervised the planting of some 100,000 saplings and tree cuttings.

Fell’s not a bad looking guy (Wiki photo):

jessefell

Under “Notable People” from Larchwood is Cheri Blauwet.  From Wiki:

Cheri Blauwet (born May 15, 1980) is an American wheelchair racer. She has competed at the Olympic and Paralympic level in events ranging from the 100 meters to the marathon.

Blauwet grew up in Larchwood, Iowa, in a farming family.  She began racing in high school, when she was recruited by her school’s track and field coach. She later attended the University of Arizona, where she was a member of the school’s wheelchair racing team

She graduated magna cum laude with a degree in molecular biology. She attended Stanford University School of Medicine and completed her residency including being chief resident in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School. She is currently a Fellow in Sports Medicine at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC).

She competed in her first marathon in Japan in 2002, and two weeks later won the New York City race, her second marathon.  She then went on to win the New York City Marathon twice (2002, 2003), the Boston Marathon twice (2004, 2005), and the Los Angeles Marathon four times (2003, 2004, 2005, and 2008).

Wow.  Another smart jock!  (I say “another” because I recently wrote about former Major League Baseball catcher Johnny Bench, who was valedictorian of his Binger, Oklahoma high school class).

Here’s a shot of Dr. Blauwet (from BU.edu – Boston University):

Blauwet, Cheri MD

And another – a Reuters photo of her defending her Boston Marathon title in 2005:

Defending Boston Marathon women's wheelchair champion Cheri Blauwet of the United States crosses the finish line to win the 109th Boston Marathon in a time of one hour, forty-seven minutes and forty-five seconds in Boston, Massachusetts April 18, 2005. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Defending Boston Marathon women’s wheelchair champion Cheri Blauwet of the United States crosses the finish line to win the 109th Boston Marathon in a time of one hour, forty-seven minutes and forty-five seconds in Boston, Massachusetts April 18, 2005. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

And here’s a very cool PBS.org video of Cheri talking about . . . Cheri:

 

It’s time for closing GE Pano shots (and I really mean closing). Yes.  This may be the last GE pano shots posted on this blog.  I went a little overboard, but thanks to Mike Oistad, these are good ‘uns.  I’ll start in Good Earth State Park, South Dakota:

pano-mike-oistad1-good-earth

pano-mike-oistad2-good-earth

pano-mike-oistad4-good-earth

pano-mike-oistad5-good-earth

pano-mike-oistad6-good-earth

pano-mike-oistad7-good-earth

pano-mike-oistad8-good-earth

And I’ll close with some from Gitchie Monitou State Preserve in Iowa, starting with an old house constructed of Sioux Quartzite (and followed by more traditional scenic shots):

pano-mike-oistad-gitchie-2

Note that interior decoration for the above was provided by FRED.

pano-mike-oistad-gitchie-3

pano-mike-oistad-gitchie-1

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Reidsville, North Carolina

Posted by graywacke on December 22, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2315; A Landing A Day blog post number 746.

untitledDan:  Today’s lat/long (36o 15.953’N, 79o 41.338’W) puts me in North Central North Carolina:

landing-1

And my local landing map:

landing-2

My streams-only map shows that I landed very close to and obviously in the watershed of the Haw River (3rd hit), on to the Cape Fear (12th hit):

landing-3

Without further ado, click HERE to access my Google Earth (GE) space flight in to N-Cen NC.

I have decent GE Street View coverage of my landing:

 ge-sv-landing-map

And here’s what the Orange Dude sees:

 ge-sv-landing

And I’m not too far from Street View coverage of the Haw River:

 ge-sv-haw-map

And here ‘tis:

ge-sv-haw

Reidsville is pretty much hookless (as are some other small towns just outside my local landing map).  The only thing that caught my eye is in the “Notable People” list:  one Tony Rice, bluegrass musician.  I had never heard of him, but his name was clickable, so I clicked (and clicked and clicked).

He is a true bluegrass music legend, both as an acoustic guitar player and a singer.  Although he was born a few miles north in Danville VA, he has long resided in Reidsville (and still does, I believe).

He has had serious health issues and can no longer sing, and can rarely play the guitar.  From a 2014 NY Times Magazine article by Sandra Beasley (NY Times photo by Jeremy M. Lang):ny-times-pic

Rice’s warm, slightly nasal baritone has been silenced for nearly two decades by muscle-tension dysphonia, a disorder that contracts muscles around the vocal cords, interrupting speech and strangling pitch. Rice attributes the throat spasms partly to the strain of singing for years above his natural range — though he does not deny that the stress of life on the road has played its part as well. The last time he recalls singing in public was the 1994 Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival. “Guys, this is it,” he said midset. “I have to shut it down.”

Just to give you an idea of how revered this guy is, here’s a piece by John Lawless who writes for Bluegrass Today:

In bluegrass music circles, no question is asked more consistently that some variation of, “What’s going on with Tony Rice?”

Followers of his music reacted with immediate generosity in 2013 when an appeal went out for financial support when he was unable to perform, and reaction to his stirring speech (in his natural voice) when inducted into the IBMA’s Bluegrass Hall of Fame in September of that year demonstrated the hold Rice has on the imagination and heart of the bluegrass community.

Pretty much everyone in our world has at least wondered one or twice how Tony was doing with both his speech therapy and the arm and hand problems that were preventing him from playing the guitar. The notoriously private Rice clan hasn’t been offering much information.

But fortunately, the Greensboro, NC News & Record’s Dawn DeCwikiel-Kane caught up with Tony when he was in Eden over the weekend to accept a Lifetime Achievement Award at the annual Charlie Poole Music Festival.

She asked the question that has had all of bluegrass buzzing this past two years…

Rice said he aims to return to performing, but he isn’t sure when.

“My father had a saying, ‘When you don’t know what to do, don’t do anything,’ ” he said.

“So many of my jazz heroes, they reached that point where they had to take a few years off,” he added. “Their bodies were worn out from the road and so much work. … When I read that other musical heroes were having to do the same thing in their life, having to take a long hiatus for various reasons, then I don’t feel so bad.

“But I am not going to go back out into the public eye until I can be the musician that I was, where I left off or better,” Rice said. “I have been blessed with a very devout audience all these years, and I am certainly not going to let anybody down. I am not going to risk going out there and performing in front of people again until I can entertain them in a way that takes away from them the rigors and the dust, the bumps in the road of everyday life.”

So… still no definitive answer, but a very hopeful sign for those of us who miss seeing Tony Rice on the stage where he was meant to appear.

Of course, I need a few You Tube videos.  I’ll start out with a fairly young Tony, accompanying himself, singing Church Street Blues.  Note that you get a good view of his picking style.  Although it sounds like finger picking, he’s just using a flat pick.

 

Here come Nine Pound Hammer by the Tony Rice All Star Jam.  Wow.  All these guys are incredible!

 

And now Freeborn Man, also by the Tony Rice All Star Jam (at the same gig), but this time also featuring Bela Fleck, famed (and 16-time Grammy winner) banjo player.

 

Time to put a wrap on this here flat-pickin’ post.  I found this GE Panoramio shot by Steve “Country Traveler” Tysinger, taken about 2 miles NE of my landing:

pano-steve-country-traveler-tysinger

This looked instantly familiar to me, because of some old silos located about 800 miles SSE of this landing.  Say what?  (You may ask).  Well, here’s where 800 miles SSE of this landing puts me:

silos-on-eleuthera

As those of you who know me are well aware, my wife Jody and her brother Skip built a beach house on Eleuthera.  Not surprisingly, I’ve been there many, many times.  I absolutely love our house and love spending time on Eleuthera. 

Anyway, countless times I’ve driven on the stretch of Queen’s Highway between Gregory Town and Hatchet Bay (our house is just north of Gregory Town and Hatchet Bay is further south).  Queen’s highway is the N-S road that is Eleuthera’s major road (and it doesn’t even have a center stripe).

 Here’s what one sees (GE Pano shot by Kodac Gibson):

pano-kodac-gibson

And here’s another nearby shot, by arnopg:

pano-arnopg

This part of Eleuthera was a thriving agricultural area back in the day, but hasn’t been active for a long time.  Some folks say the silos stored cattle food, while others are more vague . . .

And just for the heck of it, here’s a gratuitous shot of the beach where our house is (by yours truly).  The island is Gaulding Cay.

our-beach-same-rough-day

And on the same day as the above (and less than hour earlier), here’s a shot on the east (ocean) side of the island, less than half a mile away (same photo credit):

dsc01253

And, also by the same excellent photographer (several years later):

rainbow-gc-1

If you’re curious about our house (which we rent out), it’s called The Cay House.  Go to TheCayHouse.com to check it out.

Enough, already.  Back to North Carolina, I’ll close with this lovely Pano shot by Timothy Watkins, about 5 miles north of my landing:

pano-timothy-watkins-5-miles-n

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Cogar, Oklahoma (Revisited)

Posted by graywacke on December 19, 2016

Dan – My most recent post included a visit to Cogar, Oklahoma.  As you’ll see, I feel like I need a quick return visit.

I’ll repeat the Cogar portion of that post here:

The smallest of the towns (it doesn’t really exist any more) is Cogar. It’s claim to fame (and I mean only claim to fame) is that a scene from the movie Rain Man was shot there.

rain_man_poster

More specifically, the scene involved a phone call from a phone booth in front of:

pano-fireboat895

(Pano shot by Fireboat895).  My guess is that they imported a phone booth for the shot.

Wiki on Rain Man:

It tells the story of an abrasive and selfish young wheeler-dealer, Charlie Babbitt (Tom Cruise), who discovers that his estranged father has died and bequeathed all of his multimillion-dollar estate to his other son, Raymond (Dustin Hoffman), an autistic savant, of whose existence Charlie was unaware.

Leaving Wiki, and grossly simplifying/paraphrasing:

Charlie & Raymond meet in Cincinnati (where Raymond is in a mental institution), and the two embark on a road trip to Los Angeles, so Charlie can finish importing four Lamborghinis (no way Raymond would fly).

Through many twists and turns, the story line evolves to where Charlie learns to appreciate (love?) his crazy little brother.

I’m pretty sure I saw the movie back in the day, but it seems to be worth another shot.  And now, of course, I’d be anxious to see Cogar . . .

Back to now.  Well, just last night, my wife Jody and I watched Rain Man.  While she remembers watching it back in the day (late 1988, early 1989), I most definitely had never seen it.

We watched it on the DVR, and I was able to get a few screen shots.  First, here’s their car (the 1949 Buick which Charlie & Raymond’s father left to Charlie) in front of the old Cogar store:

img_1265-002

Notice the phone booth?  I speculated that it was brought in for the movie shot, but now I’m not so sure.  After all, this was 1988!

I think that Raymond and Charlie are in the phone booth together in the above shot, but here’s a close-up, from a scene just a minute later:

img_1266

Raymond (as always) is very nervous.  He is nervous about how small the phone booth is, and he’s also worried that the Judge Wapner show (which he never misses) will be on TV soon.

We both really enjoyed the movie, and even watched the credits (which one tends to do more often after truly enjoying the movie).  While the credits were rolling, I noticed this:

img_1267

Routes 152 and 37 are Oklahoma Routes 152 and 37.  I think the lower left sign is also for Route 37, but heading off in another direction.  Why am I interested in this (you may ask) and how do I know it’s Oklahoma?  Well, check out this Street Atlas map:

cogar-route-signs

You can see that Cogar is at the intersection of Routes 152 and 37!   I’m sure the road sign is right in Cogar, and I suspect that it’s for drivers headed east on 152 where they have a choice of going straight on 152/37, or turning left on 37.  Is this cool or what!?!

I bet precious few (if any) of the millions upon millions of Rain Man viewers had a clue about this road sign that shows up only when the credits are running.  But you, ALAD Nation, are now in on an awesome little secret!

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Binger, Hinton, Cogar and Lookeba, Oklahoma

Posted by graywacke on December 17, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2314; A Landing A Day blog post number 744.

whateverDan:  Today’s lat/long (35o 24.551’N, 98o 13.675’W) puts me in Central-East Oklahoma:

landing-1

My local landing map shows my titular towns:

landing-2

My close-in streams-only map:

landing-3a

I’d call it inconclusive.  I either landed directly in the watershed of the Canadian River, or in the Buggy Creek watershed.  Hmmm.  Looks like I need Google Earth (GE) to figure out the details. 

So, without further ado, here’s my GE space flight into W-Cen OK.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, then hit your back button.

I’m not sure if you were able to pick out the subtleties of the watersheds, but here’s a static GE shot that tells the story:

ge-1

So, in fact, I landed in the watershed of Buggy Creek.  I’ll zoom out a little to confirm that Buggy Creek ends up in the Canadian:

landing-3b

Which it does (my 46th hit for the Canadian).  Zooming way back:

landing-3c

The Canadian discharges in the Arkansas (124th hit), on to the MM (903rd hit).

So I have four (count ‘em) four towns to talk about.  Don’t get too excited, they ain’t much for hooks.

I’ll start with Binger (pop 672), which has a single hook, as indicated by this shot by Christopher Wheeler on pbase.com:

51176400-bingeroklahoma

Well looky there.  Binger is the home of Johnny Bench – often called baseball’s greatest catcher ever.  From Wiki:

Bench played baseball and basketball and was class valedictorian [a smart jock, eh? good for him!] at Binger High School in Binger, Oklahoma.  He is one-eight Choctaw [I assume one of his grandparents was half Choctaw].

His father told him that the fastest route to becoming a major leaguer was as a catcher. Bench was drafted 36th overall by the Cincinnati Reds in the second round of the 1965 amateur draft.

After a couple of years in the minors, he went on to become an All-Star and eventual Hall of Fame baseball player, an integral part of the “Big Red Machine” that went to the playoffs numerous times and the World Series four times (winning two).

Here’s a shot of Bench in his prime – at the 1972 All Star game in Atlanta (from Getty Images):

ATLANTA, GA - JULY 25: Jonny Bench #5 of the Cincinnati Reds and National League All-Stars in action against the American League All-Stars during Major League Baseball All-Star game July 25, 1972 at Atlanta Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. The National League won the game 4-3. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Jonny Bench

And here’s a 2006 shot from Wiki (by Raphael Amado Deras):

bench_johnny

Time to move up to Hinton (pop 3,200). It’s pretty much hookless, except for a lovely park located just south of town (GE Pano shot by Tim3Jones):

pano-tim3jones-2

Staying with Tim3Jones, here’s a shot of one of the rock formations:

pano-tim3jones

And a couple by Marlebu:

pano-marelbu

pano-marelbu2

The smallest of the towns (it doesn’t really exist any more) is Cogar. It’s claim to fame (and I mean only claim to fame) is that a scene from the movie Rain Man was shot there.

rain_man_poster

More specifically, the scene involved a phone call from a phone booth in front of:

pano-fireboat895

(Pano shot by Fireboat895).  My guess is that they imported a phone booth for the shot.

Wiki on Rain Man:

It tells the story of an abrasive and selfish young wheeler-dealer, Charlie Babbitt (Tom Cruise), who discovers that his estranged father has died and bequeathed all of his multimillion-dollar estate to his other son, Raymond (Dustin Hoffman), an autistic savant, of whose existence Charlie was unaware.

Leaving Wiki, and grossly simplifying/paraphrasing:

Charlie & Raymond meet in Cincinnati (where Raymond is in a mental institution), and the two embark on a road trip to Los Angeles, so Charlie can finish importing four Lamborghinis (no way Raymond would fly).

Through many twists and turns, the story line evolves to where Charlie learns to appreciate (love?) his crazy little brother.

I’m pretty sure I saw the movie back in the day, but it seems to be worth another shot.  And now, of course, I’d be anxious to see Cogar . . .

One more titular town, and that would be Lookeba.  From Wiki:

Lookeba (pop 166) is a town in Caddo County, Oklahoma.  The name is a composite of the names of three founding fathers: Lowe, Kelley and Baker.

For regular readers, my next comment is entirely expected: Why Lookeba, and not Lokeba?  And yes, I like Lokeba better . . .

But the real Lookeba hook is for the birds.  From KFOR.com (out of Oklahoma City):

LOOKEBA, OKLAHOMA — The house sits on a hilltop in Caddo County.  Sonny House lives here with hundreds of tiny guests.

“They’re coming and going all the time,” he says. “You look out the window sometimes and they’re just going up and down.”

His father fed them when he lived on the property.  The Houses have always provided a home for hummingbirds.  Sonny carries on the tradition of playing gentle host.

Every once in a while his guests arrive in great numbers.

“There’s at least 150,” he guesses.

“I figured it up. They drink at least 92 ounces of sugar water a day.”

He doesn’t know why they cluster.  Sonny just sits back and enjoys the show, as Ruby Throats and Black Chins battle for aerial position.

He doesn’t feel like he can leave when the hummingbird count is this high.  He stays busy refilling bottles of nectar.

“Yeah,” he agrees. “You can’t take off and go to Houston. You have to be here at least once a day.”

“But hey:  I get my money’s worth.”

There’s a great video of Sonny House’s hummingbirds, but for some reason, I couldn’t embed it.  So, simply click HERE, and watch!

I’ll close with this Pano shot taken about 4 miles NW of my landing by GeoJerrod:

pano-geojerrod

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Sweet Home, Oregon

Posted by graywacke on December 12, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2313; A Landing A Day blog post number 743.

whateverDan:  Today’s lat/long (44o 30.230’N, 122o 12.419’W) puts me in northwestern Oregon:

landing-1

My local map shows I’m out in the middle of nowhere:

landing-2

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of Jude Creek, on to the Middle Santiam River (1st hit ever!):

landing-3a

And as you can see, the Middle Santiam discharges to the South Santiam (2rd hit).  Zooming back:

landing-3b

The South Santiam makes its way to the Santiam (3rd hit); which in turn discharges in the Willamette (14th hit). 

“Remember, class, how we pronounce Willamette?  Repeat after me:  will-AH-met.”

The will-AH-met flows through Portland just before discharging to the Columbia (164th hit).

“And class, can anybody tell me what comes next in this A Landing A Day post?  In the back – is that you, Sam – yes, Sam?” 

Sam:  “Next comes my favorite part – the Google Earth (GE) spaceflight!”

“Very good, Sam.  So class, click HERE and enjoy the trip!  Don’t forget to hit your back button . . .”

Staying with GE (and ditching the class), here’s a shot showing my landing, the Middle Santiam valley, and Mount Jefferson (about 23 miles NE of my landing):

ge1

Speaking of the Middle Santiam, here’s a GE Panoramio shot of the River, just a mile east of my landing (by Thomas Gilg):

pano-thomas-gilg

And speaking of Thomas Gilg, he took some pictures about 2 miles east of my landing, on Pyramid Creek.  “Bridge half to nowhere,” eh?  Sounds interesting.

ge2-bridge-to-nowhere

Here’s his picture taken from the half bridge to nowhere, looking down Pyramid Creek towards the Middle Santiam:

pano-thomas-gilg-2

And here’s the end of the bridge that abruptly truncates halfway across the stream:

pano-thomas-gilg-3

Moving right along – I looked for GE SV coverage of my rivers, but couldn’t find much.  The best I could do was a bridge over the South Santiam about 10 miles southwest of my landing:

ge-sv-covered-bridge-map

When I zoomed in for a closer look, this is what I saw:

ge-3-covered-bridge

Could that be a covered bridge?  I’ll have the Orange Dude (OD) take a closer look:

ge-sv-covered-bridge-1

It is!  It is a covered bridge!  Here’s the OD’s view from within:

ge-sv-covered-bridge-2

And here’s what the OD sees when looking upstream:

ge-sv-covered-bridge-3

With a little research, I found out that this is the “Short Covered Bridge,” which was built in 1945 and is on the National Registry of Historic Places.  Of course, I was curious about the “Long Covered Bridge,” but discovered that the bridge was named after Gordon Short, a long-time area resident.

So, I guess its time to take a look at Sweet Home (all other towns were hookless).

From the Sweet Home town website:

Settlers first arrived in the Sweet Home Valley in 1851. Early settlers shared the valley with the friendly Santiam band of the Kalapuyan Indian Tribe. The Indians occupied this part of Eastern Linn County until 1921 when Indian Lize, the last remaining member of the Kalapuyan tribe, died.

I did a little research on the Kalapuyans.  BWM*, they numbered perhaps 15,000, and were reduced to less than 600 by European diseases.

*Before White Men

Of course, I checked out Sweet Home on Wiki.  I noticed that there was a writer listed under “Notable People,” one Howard Bergerson.  His name was clickable, so, of course, I clicked.  Here’s the intro on Wiki:

Howard William Bergerson (1922 – February 2011) was an American writer and poet, noted for his mastery of palindromes and other forms of wordplay.

howard_w-_bergerson_2007The article includes this photo by Merlia McLaughlin.  Continuing:

By 1961, Bergerson’s interests had shifted to wordplay and constrained writing. He became fascinated with palindromes and set out to write a coherent, full-length palindromic poem. The result, the 1034-letter “Edna Waterfall”, was for some time listed by the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest palindrome in English.

His 1973 book Palindromes and Anagrams was influential among wordplay enthusiasts, and has been hailed by critics as a “sine qua non for all serious logologists” and the greatest ever book on palindromes.  He is often cited as one of the greatest palindromists of all time.

(Logology = the field of recreational linguistics.)

I’m going to present Edna Waterfall in its entirety.  This is an incredibly long and complex palindrome.  I spent quite some time doing the following:

  • finding the exact middle of the palindrome, which is a key location (it’s marked below with an *) and
  • using color coding, I identified some frontwards location (after the midpoint) and the corresponding backwards locations (before the midpoint) of particular lines that caught my fancy.  I tended to stay in the middle of the poem, because it’s easier to start there and work outward.

Anyway, here goes:

Edna Waterfall
A PALINDROME
HOWARD W. BERGERSON
Sweet Home, Oregon

Deliver no evil, avid diva I saw die.
Render an unsung aria for erotogenic id.
O never egg Alec Naif, fairer Edna Waterfall,
A nonassimilative, volatile reef-dweller-apparelless brag!
Natasha I saw die, render an unsung aria.
For Edna Waterfall-a liar-familiar feuds live:
Dastard Ogre and Edna!
Pupils, one tacit song or poem-or didos deft.
Celestial lives (Ida rapt as Naomi)
Laud smegma, alas-keep never a frondlet on.
So did no solo snoop malign
Irised sad eyen. Oh dewed yen-
Oh tressed May noon, hello! Tacit songs rev!
Love’s barge of assent carts base tarts,
A cerise deb abed, unreined flesh.
Sin-a viand-Edna sees and Edna has,
Or bust fossettes, or red*der rosettes.           (* is the exact middle of the poem)
Soft sub-rosa hand Edna sees,
And, Edna, I vanish-self-denier!
Nude babe, desire castrates abstractness,          (my favorite line!)
A foe grabs Evolver’s Gnostic Atoll, eh? No!
On, yam, (dessert-honeydewed), honeyed as desiring!
I lampoon solos on didos. Not eld nor far
(Even peek! “Salaam, gems dual,” I moan)
Sat Paradise Villa, its elect fed.
So did Romeo prognosticate no slipup,
And Edna, ergo, drats a devil’s due:
“Frail! I’m a frail all a·fret, a-wander!
“0 fair Agnus nun, a red Nereid was I.
“Ah Satan, garb’s seller,
“Apparel (lewd fee) relit a love vital I miss anon.
“All a·fret, a wanderer I affiance”
Lagger even odic-in ego ‘torero’.
“Fair Agnus nun, a red Nereid was I.
“Avid diva, live on reviled.”

Phew. 

I’ll take this opportunity to post my all-time favorite Weird Al video.  If you haven’t seen this before, trust me:  it’s great (and it’s apropos):

And just in case you don’t know the Bob Dylan video that Weird Al parodied, here ’tis (and you’ll see how uncannily precise Weird Al was):

Time for some GE Pano shots.  Here’s a shot of some intrepid winter hikers, taken by GSMick about 5 miles southeast of my landing (and looking towards Mount Jefferson):

pano-gsmick

Here’s a mountain meadow (about 8 miles southeast) by Bill Shaffer (the distinctive vegetation is bear grass):

pano-bill-shaffer

I’ll close with this a lovely fall shot (about 6.5 miles east) by Will Abbott:

pano-will-abbott-6-5-mi-east

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Culpeper (and nearby Civil War battle sites), Virginia

Posted by graywacke on December 7, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2312; A Landing A Day blog post number 742.

untitledDan:  Today’s lat/long (38o 21.555’N, 77o 56.758’W) puts me in north central Virginia:

landing-1

My local landing map shows a VP* of small towns:

landing-2

*veritable plethora

My streams-only map shows that I landed very close to the Rapidan River, and obviously in the Rapidan River watershed (1st hit ever!):

landing-3

As you can see, the Rapidan discharges to the Rappahannock (2nd hit), on to the Chesapeake Bay.

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight on in to North Central Virginia.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

There’s decent Street View coverage of my landing:

ge-sv-landing-map

Although he’s close, the Orange Dude (OD) can’t quite see the precise landing location:

ge-sv-landing

I sent the OD a little ways upstream to get a look at the Rapidan:

ge-sv-rapidan-map

Here’s what the he sees:

ge-sv-rapidan

I like the name “Rapidan,” so had to learn a little more.  From Wiki:

The name is a combination of the word “rapid” with the name of Queen Anne of England. Originally, it was known as the Rapid Ann River.

Well, I think it should have been the Rapid Anne River – I mean, really – if you’re going to name the river after a queen, get her name right.  And incidentally, I’d vote for the Rapid Anne (or Ann) over the Rapidan . . .

And here’s another bit from Wiki:

The Rapidan River was the scene of severe fighting in the American Civil War, and historic sites such as Chancellorsville and the Battle of the Wilderness are nearby.

I’ll get to some Civil War content in a bit, but first, a personal story about Culpeper.

I worked for the USEPA Region III in Philadelphia for a couple of years, more-or-less centered on 1985.   (VA, along with DE, PA and WV make up Region III).  I worked in the Superfund program, as part of the “Enforcement” group.  Our job was to get “Responsible Parties” (i.e., industries that caused the pollution) to step up and do the investigations and clean-ups.  I was strictly a technical guy, providing support to the site managers.

I still remember a trip to Culpeper to visit a Superfund site.  The site was a wood treatment facility.  (Some nasty chemicals, both organic and inorganic, are used to pressure-treat lumber).  I remember practically nothing about the trip.  Anyway, I Googled Superfund Culpeper to see what was going on some 30 years later.

The EPA has a Culpeper website:

superfund

The website tells me that the Culpeper Wood Preservers site used arsenic and chromium compounds to treat the wood, and spills / leaks of these compounds ended up contaminating the soils and groundwater.  The site became a Superfund site on June 10, 1986 (towards the end of my stint at EPA).

The site investigation (taking samples to determine the extent of soil and groundwater contamination) is yet to be completed!  And the clean-up plan for the site has also not been completed!

Two things:  Most site investigations can be completed within 5 years, 10 years at the outside.  And after that, it doesn’t take much time to develop a clean-up plan (Feasibility Study in Superfund parlance).  This obviously speaks to the bureaucracy and inefficiency of the federal Superfund program.  Way more money is spent on attorneys than on actual clean-ups.

Secondly:  In my not-so-humble opinion, there is no reason that this site became a Superfund site in the first place!  From what I can gather, no off-site water wells have been contaminated; in fact, the groundwater contamination hasn’t left the site (and very likely never will).  Most, if not all, of the soil contamination was cleaned up in 1983 before the site went Superfund.

In other words, this site, in the environmental world of contaminated sites, is no big deal!  Superfund sites should be the worst of the worst, with extreme risks to either the public or the environment.  (I had nothing to do with the selection of Superfund sites.)   If this is a Superfund Site, there should be thousands of Superfund sites in NJ alone!

Don’t get me wrong:  I’m not saying that the Culpeper Site shouldn’t be investigated and cleaned-up / controlled (it should).  But let the State of Virginia take care of it!  It’ll be less expensive and way more efficient (and the public / environment will be protected).

FYI, there are some 1,300 Superfund Sites.  I’ll bet that at least half of these should be left to the states . . .

I’ll get off my soap box (which, as regular readers know, I’m practically never on).

Moving on to a topic more typically ALAD-like:  As mentioned above, two very significant Civil War battles were fought near my landing:  Chancellorsville and the Wilderness. 

Here’s a GE shot showing Wilderness (one of the VP of small towns shown on my local landing map), along with Chancellorsville (the battle site) and the Battle of the Wilderness site:

ge-battle-of-the-wilderness

The stories of these battles are complex and way too lengthy for a simple ALAD post.  Chancellorsville is known as a high point for the Confederacy, and is considered perhaps the greatest of Confederate victories, won in spite of the fact that Robert E. Lee’s troops were outnumbered 2 to 1 by the Union Army led by General Hooker. 

But it was a costly victory for the Confederacy, as Stonewall Jackson lost his life here.  He was wounded at the battle (by friendly fire); his arm was amputated, and then he died of pneumonia a week later.  So, how about a brief Stonewall feature?  Here’s a Wiki picture of the General:

stonewall_jackson_by_routzahn_1862

From Son of the South.net, this about how he got his nickname:

robinson-house

HERE “STONEWALL” JACKSON WON HIS NAME

Robinson House, Bull Run.—”Stonewall” Jackson won his name near this house early in the afternoon of July 21, 1861 at the First Battle of Bull Run. Meeting Confederate General Barnard Bee’s retreating troops, Jackson advanced with a battery to the ridge behind the Robinson House and held the position until Bee’s troops had rallied in his rear. General Bee  said to a colleague:  “Look at Jackson standing there like a stone wall.”  Bee was killed soon thereafter just as the Confederate troops took the upper hand.

When General Lee heard about the amputation of Stonewall’s arm, he lamented, “”He has lost his left arm, but I have lost my right.”  History doesn’t record what he said when he learned Stonewall had died.

As I always do, I looked at various GE Panoramio shots in the vicinity of my landing.  I came across this:

ge-stonewalls-arm

And yes, the Pano shot showed a gravestone.  But here’s a better shot of the gravestone, from Bucknell.edu:

stonewallsarm-web

Really?  I quickly Googled “grave Stonewall Jackson’s arm,” and found an NPR story:  “The Curious Fate of Stonewall Jackson’s Arm,” by Ramona Martinez (heard on Morning Edition in June of 2012).  Here are some excerpts:

[After the amputation], Jackson’s arm was about to be tossed on the pile of limbs outside the medical tents — until his military chaplain decided to save it.

Park Ranger Chuck Young tells a group of visitors: “Remembering that Jackson was the rock star of 1863 — everybody knew who Stonewall was, and to have his arm just simply thrown on the scrap pile with the other arms, Military Chaplain Rev. Lacy couldn’t let that happen.”

So the arm was buried in a private cemetery at Ellwood Manor, not far from the field hospital where it was amputated. Soon after, Jackson died of pneumonia, and his body was sent to his family in Lexington, Va.

But, Young says, Jackson’s arm was never reunited with the rest of his remains.

“When Mrs. Jackson ass informed that the arm was amputated and given a full Christian burial,” Young says, “they asked her if she wanted it exhumed and buried with the general. She declined, not wishing to disturb a Christian burial.”

In 1903, one of Jackson’s staff officers set up a granite stone in the small cemetery. It’s unclear if the stone marks the exact location of the arm, or if it indicates that the burial happened somewhere in the area.

Just a little more about Stonewall.  About his military prowess, From Wiki:

Military historians consider Jackson to be one of the most gifted tactical commanders in U.S. history.  His Valley Campaign and his envelopment of the Union Army’s right wing at Chancellorsville are studied worldwide, even today, as examples of innovative and bold leadership.

About his character and his ambivalent feelings towards slavery (Wiki):

In Lexington [VA, where he lived and worked before the war], Jackson was revered by many of the African Americans, both slaves and free blacks. In 1855, he was instrumental in the organization of Sunday School classes for blacks at the Presbyterian Church. His second wife, Mary Anna Jackson, taught with Jackson, as “he preferred that my labors should be given to the colored children, believing that it was more important and useful to put the strong hand of the Gospel under the ignorant African race, to lift them up.”

The pastor, Dr. William Spottswood White, described the relationship between Jackson and his Sunday afternoon students: “In their religious instruction he succeeded wonderfully. His discipline was systematic and firm, but very kind. … His servants reverenced and loved him, as they would have done a brother or father. … He was emphatically the black man’s friend.”

Jackson’s family owned six slaves in the late 1850s. After the Civil War began he appears to have hired out or sold his slaves. Mary Anna Jackson, in her 1895 memoir, said, “our servants … without the firm guidance and restraint of their master, the excitement of the times proved so demoralizing to them that he deemed it best for me to provide them with good homes among the permanent residents.”  James Robertson wrote about Jackson’s view on slavery:

Jackson neither apologized for nor spoke in favor of the practice of slavery. He probably opposed the institution. Yet in his mind the Creator had sanctioned slavery, and man had no moral right to challenge its existence. The good Christian slaveholder was one who treated his servants fairly and humanely at all times.

“The Creator had sanctioned slavery,” eh?  I don’t know the bible very well (in spite of the fact that my father was a Presbyterian minister), but a little research, and I came across this, from religion.blogs.cnn.com:

How the Bible was used to justify slavery, abolitionism

By John Blake, CNN

(CNN) – How did churchgoing, Bible-worshiping Christians justify holding slaves? It’s a question I’ve long had as a Civil War buff.

Henry Brinton, a pastor at Fairfax Presbyterian Church in Virginia, writes that the Bible was used a weapon by both the North and the South.

Slaveholders justified the practice by citing the Bible, Brinton says.

Ephesians 6:5 – They asked who could question the Word of God when it said, “slaves, obey your earthly masters with fear and trembling”

Epistle of Paul to Titus 2:9 – “tell slaves to be submissive to their masters and to give satisfaction in every respect”

All I can say is that Paul was, as all of us are, a product of their time. . .

Wow.  First I’m on a soap box criticizing the Superfund program, and then I’m quoting controversial Bible verses.  What is this blog coming to?  Fear not, dear readers.  I will continue my custom of avoiding trips into contentious waters . . .

On that note, I’ll go to the safe harbor of a GE Panoramio shot. This is a lovely one, taken by T. K. Ogden, about 3 miles east of my landing:

pano-tkogden-3-miles-east

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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