A Landing a Day

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Richwood, West Virginia

Posted by graywacke on July 24, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2284; A Landing A Day blog post number 714.

Dan:  After a brief sojourn to UServille, it’s back to OSers (11 of my last 12 landings), with today’s West Virginia landing.  Yes, I’ve landed in WV one other time since I changed my random lat/long methodology.

If the last paragraph is a head scratcher, check out “About Landing (Revisited),” above.  If you have no itch to scratch, just keep reading . . .

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

My watershed analysis is based on three streams-only maps.  I’ll start with this one:

landing 3a

It shows that I landed in the watershed of Manning Branch; on to the Laurel Creek.  Zooming back a little, we can see that the Laurel discharges to the Cherry River (first hit ever!), on to the Gauley R (2nd hit):

landing 3b

OK, so I have to zoom back one more time so we can see that the Gauley makes its way to the Kanawha (13th hit), on to the Ohio (139th hit):

landing 3c

Of course, the Ohio joins the MM (895th hit).

You’ll never guess what comes next.  OK.  So you (and every other regular reader) guessed.  Well, here’s my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight to SE WV.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

There was no worthwhile GE Street View coverage for my landing, but I did find coverage for the Cherry River:

ge sv cherry r map

Here’s what the Orange Dude sees (looking downstream):

ge sv cherry r down

And upstream:

ge sv cherry r up

Moving right along . . . before I checked out Richwood, I noticed this Panoramio shot while perusing GE:

ge nancy hart grave

The Panoramio picture of Nancy Hart’s grave is less than inspirational, but I went to Wiki where they had a better one:

wiki grave

I wasn’t thrilled with the Wiki article about Nancy, but found CivilWarWomenBlog, with a post about Ms. Hart by Maggie MacLean.  Quite the lady, that Nancy Hart.  Here are some excerpts (most of the post, actually) – it’s a little long, but well worth the read:

Nancy Hart, a Confederate spy and soldier, was born in 1846, in Raleigh, North Carolina. When she was an infant, her family moved to Tazewell, Virginia.

In 1853, Nancy and her family moved in with her sister and brother-in-law, Mary and William Clay Price. In the next six years, Nancy lived in the wilderness of Roane County, Virginia—now West Virginia. She became an excellent shot with a rifle and an expert rider.

After the Civil War began, western Virginia became a dangerous place. The citizenry held divided loyalties—some pro-Confederate and many pro-Union. Neighbors, friends, and families were separated by their opposing beliefs.

William Price didn’t volunteer for service, but he aided the Confederate army when he could. In October 1861, a party of Union soldiers rode into the Prices’ yard. They announced that they were taking William to the town of Spencer for questioning. William never made it to Spencer. He was found three days later, shot in the back.

This fueled Nancy’s hatred for the Union cause. Three days later, she joined the Moccasin Rangers—a group of pro-Southern guerrillas led by Perry Conley. Nancy Hart rode at the head of the column with Perry for about two years, during 1861 and 1862, throughout the central counties of western Virginia.

[She rode at the head of the column!  Either she impressed Perry greatly, or . . .]

She carried messages between the Southern Armies, traveling alone by night and sleeping during the day. She also saved the lives of many wounded Confederate soldiers by hiding them with sympathizers.

Nancy posed as a farm girl and peddled eggs and vegetables to the Yankees in order to spy on them. She scouted isolated Federal outposts in the mountains and reported their strength, population, and vulnerability to General Stonewall Jackson. Nancy led Jackson’s Cavalry on several raids against Union troops.

[Her resume is getting quite impressive!]

After Perry Conley was killed by Union troops in the summer of 1862, the Moccasin Rangers disbanded and Nancy married Joshua Douglas.  They moved into the mountains of Nicholas County, near the Confederate lines, where she continued to carry information to the regular forces while passing as an innocent country girl.

Later that same summer, a large reward was offered for Nancy’s capture. She was recognized, captured and held prisoner in Summersville WV in the upstairs portion of a dilapidated house, with soldiers quartered downstairs and a sentry with her at all times.

While in captivity, she was photographed:

wiki nancy hart

One evening, Nancy grabbed the pistol from her naive young guard, and shot him dead with a single shot. She leapt out a second-story window into a clump of tall jimson weeds, stole a horse, and escaped behind Confederate lines.

[Wow.]

About a week later at 4:00 am, Nancy returned to Summersville with 200 Confederate cavalrymen. The Rebel troops came storming up the road, overran the pickets located about a quarter of a mile from the headquarters, and entered the streets of the town without opposition. The officers and soldiers were caught sleeping and fell an easy prey.

After setting fire to three houses,destroying two wagons, and taking eight mules and twelve horses, the raiders retreated, taking their prisoners with them. Nancy had her revenge.

Nancy faded out of the picture as an active partisan after that incident, but it is more than likely that she lent a helping hand, whenever possible, until the end of the war. She knew that a rope awaited her if captured again

After the war, Nancy and her husband settled down on a mountain farm near Richwood and there they passed the rest of their lives.

Nancy Hart Douglas died in 1913 (outliving her husband by 8 years), and was buried on Manning’s Knob, a mere half mile from one of the “landing” locations associated with the world-famous blog, “A Landing A Day.

There you have it.  Moving on to Richwood.  After perusing Wiki, the only thing that caught my eye was this:

Richwood calls itself the “Ramp Capital of the World” and hosts a large festival every April in honor of the pungent wild leek.

Ramp?  Pungent wild leek?  This requires research!

Well, I didn’t have to look any further than the town’s website.  Here’s a screen shot of part of the website:

website page

And this, also from the website:

website page2

Continuing:

Ramps (wild leeks, part of the Ramson family of plants) are the first green things to show their heads in spring in the Appalachian woodlands and are found in the rich woodlands of upper elevations. They taste somewhat like an onion with a garlicky flavor and a strong odor. The plants grow about a foot tall and, when eaten, a strong odor emanates from the skin of the ramps gourmand.

[Wait a sec!  The skin of the ramps gourmand (i.e., the eater), stinks?  I can only imagine what the festival smells like . . .]

At the Festival, the “little stinkers” will be served with ham, bacon, fried potatoes, brown beans and cornbread.

The website has a couple of videos.  First, here’s a Ramp Festival feature on a local TV news show (WCHS, Charleston)7:

And then, here’s a video on how to harvest ramps:

The website had links to numerous recipes;  I selected this quick and easy one by Emeril Lagasse (on the Food Network website):

Ingredients

2 pounds ramps, trimmed and cleaned

1/4 pound apple-smoked bacon, julienned*

Salt and black pepper

Directions

In a large pot bring 2 quarts of salted water to a boil and add ramps. Cook until tender, about 4 minutes. Transfer to an ice bath and remove when chilled. Drain on paper towels.

In a skillet cook bacon until crisp. Using a slotted spoon, transfer bacon to a paper towel to drain. Add ramps to bacon fat in skillet and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Sauté until lightly caramelized and serve immediately, garnished with reserved crispy bacon.

       *I’m no foodie, so I had to look up “julienne.”  It means to cut into short, thin strips.

Next time I see ramps at the market, I’ll have to pick some up . . .

I’ll close with this GE Pano shot by by Niro, taken about 12 miles SE of my landing.  And, no, there is no typo in the previous sentence.  The photographer’s handle is “by Niro.”

pano by niro

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

 

 

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Moultrie, Georgia

Posted by graywacke on July 20, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2283; A Landing A Day blog post number 713.

Dan:  Phew.  Finally.  Thanks, Georgia.  Not only are you an OSer, but you’re a first-time landing since I changed my random lat/long methodology.

My Score went down (from 773 to 747), a step in the right direction on what should be an inexorable march to a small number, asymptotic to zero.

Check out “About Landing (Revisited),” to answer most questions you might have about the above.  Still have more questions?  Then check out good ol’ “About Landing.”

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

I can tell you right off that Sigsbee and Funston are totally hookless (even though I like both names). 

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of the Ochlockonee River (3rd hit):

landing 3

The not-so-mighty Ochlockonee makes its way south through the Florida Panhandle to the G of M.

I’m anxious to get a look at the Ochlockonee, so it’s time for my Google Earth (GE) trip from the outer fringes of the atmosphere to a rural patch of S Georgia.  Click HERE, then hit your back button.

I figured there was just about a zero chance for Street View coverage on the little road near my landing.  Well, it may have been just about a zero chance, but obviously not a 0.0 chance!  Check it out:

ge sv landing map

 

And here, peeking between the bushes visible on the above shot, is what the Orange Dude sees:

ge sv landing

I had him turn 90o to show you the road that the Googlemobile driver decided to photograph:

ge sv landing 2

Makes one wonder . . . are the Google drivers paid by the hour, and do they make their own decisions about coverage?  Not far west of here, the road dead ends . . .

As mentioned above, I wanted to get a look at the Ochlockonee, and it turns out that I could get a look just a couple of miles west:

ge sv ochlock map

And here’s what the Orange Dude sees:

ge sv ochlock

Just for the heck of it, I went down river to Moultrie to get another look (and to prove to myself and my readers that this is, in fact, the Ochlockonee River):

ge sv ochlock moultrie

OK, OK.  So the sign’s a little tough to read . . .

So anyway, on to Moultrie – a pretty big town by ALAD standards (pop 14,300).  The town was named after William Moultrie, Revolutionary War hero.  Very briefly, from Wiki:

William Moultrie (1730 – 1805) was a planter and politician who became a general from South Carolina in the American Revolutionary War. As colonel leading a state militia, in 1776 he prevented the British from taking Charleston.  Fort Moultrie [and Moultrie GA] was were named in his honor.

I found Moultrie to be pretty much hookless, with the exception of two native sons.  I’ll start with Ron O’Quinn, an old-school DJ of some repute.

There’s not too much to say, really.  He started out on the radio in Moultrie, and he developed that 1960s fast-talking DJ shtick.  He spent some time doing pirate radio off the coast of England.  While there, he met the Beatles, and actually got to know them quite well.  In fact, he toured with them on their last US tour. 

He has a particular claim to fame.  Wiki states the following:

During his time at Radio England, O’Quinn accompanied The Beatles on their 1966 U.S. Tour. It is O’Quinn who coughs in the studio during the count-in to Taxman.[citation needed]

I usually don’t bother with things like “citation needed,” but in this case, it has led to a debate on whose cough made it to the recording.  Listen closely to the very beginning of Taxman (written by George Harrison on Revolver) and you can hear it. 

Because many people are obsessed with all things Beatles, I actually found a lengthy on-line chat (Amazon customers) where several people were debating whether the cough belongs to Ron O’Quinn or George Harrison.

But hey!  Ron himself thinks the cough is his.  One of the chatters referenced a blog (People Like Us, highlighting people from East Central Georgia), with the following Ron O’Quinn quote:

“Because of the notoriety our radio stations received in Europe, I was invited to meet The Beatles at the London offices of Nems Enterprise. The meeting went well and a few days later I was asked if I wanted to attend a recording session at Abbey Road. I did, of course, and while there cleared my throat, coughed actually, on the Tax Man song.”

Time to move on to another Moultrie native son, Jimmy Bryant. From Wiki:

Jimmy Bryant (1925 – 1980) was a prominent American session guitarist. He was billed as “The Fastest Guitar in the Country”.

He teamed up with one Speedy West on the following You Tube video.  These guys can really rock!  Make sure you stick with it.  The second half is awesome.

 

And here’s a funky (and rather racy) clip from the 1963 movie “The Skydivers,” featuring our hero Jimmy Bryant, with his group the Night Jumpers.

 

I discovered a white marble elephant that graces the grave of one W. F. Duggan of Moultrie (in a Moultrie cemetery).  He was one of the founders/operators of the Duggan Brothers Circus (based on some Ancestry.com info).  Evidently, the elephant was a statue of W. F.’s favorite pachyderm.  In addition, I found this little August 1934 newspaper article from the Southern Missourian:

southern missourian newspaper, august 1934

Cape Giradeau, eh?  Well, it’s a pretty big town (pop 38,000) in SE MO.  I wonder how the locals pronounce it?  I’m guessing GEER-ah-doe.  Let me see . . .

Well, one source says jer-ARE-doe.  Another, GEE-rah-dah. And yet another, jer-AH-doe (specifically, no “r” in the 2nd syllable).  And how about Jeer-are-DUE?.  Jer-ARE-doe gets a second vote.  OK.  I’ll stick with the winner, Jer-ARE-doe.

In closing, I’ll share this GE Pano shot by Ross Sims of the aforementioned white elephant.

pano ross sims

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Clinton, Arkansas

Posted by graywacke on July 16, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2282; A Landing A Day blog post number 712.

Dan:  The streak continues:  Arkansas makes ten, count ‘em, ten OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 769 to 773.  This just ain’t right.

Check out my most recent post for some insight to what I’m talking about.  For even more insight, check out “About landing (Revisited)” above.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map (about 6 miles from Clinton):

landing 2

Note that I practically landed on Route 95 (certainly not the Route 95 I’m familiar with).  Street View alert!  Street View alert!

My local landing map clearly shows that I landed in the watershed of the South Fork of the Little Red River (first hit ever!).  Zooming back, here’s a streams-only shot:

landing 3

The S Fork discharges to the Little Red (4th hit); on to the White (27th hit); on to the MM (894th hit).

It’s time to hold on tight to the yellow push pin (especially when temperatures rise during the encounter with the upper atmosphere), as we’ll travel from the near reaches of outer space to the near reaches of my landing.  Click HERE for the trip.

Here’s an oblique Google Earth shot of the immediate vicinity of my landing:

ge 1

And I repeat:  Street View alert! 

Well, sure ‘nuf, there is Street View coverage along Route 95.  I plunked the orange dude down right next to my landing, and here’s what he sees:

ge sv landing

I remember back in the day (OK, maybe three or four years ago), when Google Earth Street View would actually show my push pin when it was close.  Alas, those days are gone . . .

Here’s a GE Panoramio shot by Hogey of the S Fk of the LIttle Red River near Clinton:

pano Hogey, S Fk little red r at clinton

I landed less than five miles from Clinton, so of course I checked it out first.  Doh!  Pretty much hookless.  I expanded my landing map to check out other towns:

landing 2a

This whole area is pretty touristy, which automatically makes it less interesting to me.  And I found the towns also pretty much hookless.  So, back to Clinton (which itself is pretty much touristy).

For example, Clinton is the home of the National Championship Chuckwagon Races.  From chuckwagonraces.com:

National-Championship-Chuckwagon-Races-Clinton-AR

The Chuckwagon Races started out as a Labor Day party for a few friends by Dan and Peggy Eoff. Not one to just sit around at a party, Dan came up with the idea of racing chuckwagons to add something to the party, and his notion of an exciting Labor Day party has mushroomed into the world’s largest chuckwagon race.

Each year, the National Champions in each division take home silver buckles and share in over $25,000 in prizes.  Dan recalls, “We had eight wagons and 200 people showed up one Sunday evening and next year promoted it a little, had 16 wagons and just kept promoting it and it’s got real big. One year, some 30,000 people attended.”

Of course, now there’s live music along with plenty o’ food & drink and souvenirs . . .

I often find things to write about by checking out the GE Panormio shots in the vicinity.  Using this technique, I found another rather touristy (but much more interesting) feature near Clinton:

ge 2

Here’s a Street View shot of the sign directing motorists.  I love the ! . . . 

ge sv bridge

Here are my two favorite Pano shots of the bridge.  First this, by Violetta (aka vetaAL):

pano violetta aka vetaAL

And then this, by ELFHampton (from the same location):

pano ELFHampton

And then I found a very interesting July 2011 article by Suzi Parker (Reuters).  Here are a few excerpts:

It’s not every day that a 3-million-year-old natural sandstone bridge hits the auction block.

But on Friday morning about 20 people gathered at the base of the 120-foot-long bridge for the sale of a legendary Ozark tourist stop.

The first bid, from an unidentified woman in the crowd, was for $100,000. Less than 15 minutes later, it was Jack Smith, an elderly Navy veteran from Conway, Arkansas, who bought the bridge, gift shop, log cabin museum, moonshine still, and 101 acres of forest for $207,900.

The attraction, about 65 miles north of Little Rock, has been called a natural wonder because of its arching rock formation that was used as a wagon bridge by pioneers.

For years, and even today, barn roofs along Highway 65 are painted with advertisements luring tourists down a winding road to see the “world wonder where nature is still the boss.” A covered wagon greets visitors at the entrance.

The bridge has been in the hands of one family since 1973, when Garner Johnson bought the scenic site.

Johnson and his son Bill ran the business until their deaths about 10 years ago. Another son, Royce, now operates it, but he and his two brothers, Wayne and Harold, said they were ready to retire.

“A person can make a living with this property,” Royce Johnson said. “It’s still very successful and, at times, it can get really crazy with tourists.”

Joe David Rice of the Arkansas Tourism Director told Reuters:  “Our hope is that it’s bought by a creative and ambitious entrepreneur who can make it an exciting destination for travelers in the Ozarks.”

I checked out some on-line visitor reviews.  From Trip Advisor (April 2016), this 5-star review:

It is only about a mile in from the highway on this really pretty switchback road through the forest. The guy working there told you the history, which I liked. Made it more alive. It is a small trail but so beautiful. There was two interesting cabins to look through. It took us about 45 minutes to casually look through the whole thing and it was an awesome stretch break on a long trip. I would recommend stopping –  it was the best $5 I’ve spent in a long time.

Oh, OK.  Here’s a pretty funny 2-star review
from Yelp (June 2012):

It costs $5 to look at a rock. The rock looks like a bridge.  It’s neat, but you can’t get any closer than what you would see in a picture, so it’s hardly worth paying.  You don’t get to walk on it or even get near it.  I imagine the fear is that a couple of bubbas would take a late night drinkin’ trip here and try to jump up and down until the rock came tumblin’ down.  So they guard it so you can’t do that, or anything fun near or around it.

There’s a little guard shack disguised as a gift shop in front of it where you pay the man.  After you’ve completed your 5 minute tour ($1 per minute while you’re there), you can go back to the gift shop and buy hillbilly emblazoned junk, but you’re probably not going to because you’re gonna be just as disappointed as I was by this carnival type gimmick.

I’m not saying this isn’t a great greater wonder, but for a 150 yard trail and a little tutorial shack on how to make moonshine, I’ve seen far better for less than $5.

The bathroom had running water – that was cool (but not worth $5).

So anyway . . . of course, I checked out Scotland, AR (just 5 miles SW of my landing), but could find nothing of interest . . . until, that is, I was looking for a Pano shot to close out the post.  I found this, by Hogey (the same photographer who shot the picture of the S Fk of the Little Red River in Clinton), of the erstwhile Scotland Post Office:

pano Hogey Scotland P.O.

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

 

 

 

 

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Kaw City, Webb City and Whizbang, Oklahoma

Posted by graywacke on July 12, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2281; A Landing A Day blog post number 711.

Dan:  I’ll use the same words I used in my last two posts: AYKM?  Oklahoma makes nine, count ‘em, nine OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 765 to 769.  This just ain’t right.

In fact, I’m going to present the following table, which shows the states listed in order from most undersubscribed (those states where I haven’t landed enough, based on the state’s area; i.e., the negative numbers) to the most oversubscribed (conversely, those states where I’ve landed too often, based to the state’s area; ie. the positive numbers):

Montana -33
Utah -28
Nebraska -25
New Mexico -25
Florida -21
Nevada -21
Georgia -19
Illinois -18
Wisconsin -18
North Carolina -18
Alabama -17
Louisiana -17
New York -16
Virginia -14
Tennessee -14
Kentucky -13
Maine -12
Kansas -11
South Carolina -10
Washington -8
Maryland -4
Michigan -4
Massachusetts -3
Vermont -3
New Hampshire -3
New Jersey -3
Connecticut -2
Wyoming -1
Delaware -1
Rhode Island -1
Mississippi 0
Pennsylvania 1
Ohio 2
Minnesota 3
Idaho 3
Indiana 4
West Virginia 7
Missouri 8
Arkansas 13
North Dakota 23
Arizona 24
Texas 35
Oklahoma 39
California 39
Colorado 43
Iowa 43
Oregon 45
South Dakota 52

 

My last nine landings have been:  CO, SD, IA, AZ, CA, CA, CO, IA and OK.  See what I mean?  All, large positive numbers.  Hmmmm . . . makes one suspicious about the randomness of the random lat/long generating program I use . . .

I mean, really!  How about landing in some of the states at the top of the list?  We’ll just have to wait and see what the Landing God wants to do . . .

Check out “About Landing (Revisited” to understand the above.  (Or not, your choice .  . . )

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

And yes, I did add “Whizbang” to the above map.  More about that later.

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of the Arkansas River (122nd hit), which makes its way to the MM (893rd hit).  Incidentally, the Arkansas is in a solid 6th place on my list of river hits.

And now it’s time to ride the yellow push-pin in from outer space (courtesy of Google Earth).  Click HERE, hold on tight, then hit your back button.

I don’t have much of a Google Earth Street View shot of my landing, but here’s where I can get a look at the lake:

ge sv lake map

And what the orange dude sees:

ge sv lake

We’ll take a quick look at Kaw City and Webb City before focusing on Whizbang.

Kaw City, from Wiki:

Kaw City was named for the Kanza Indians, called the Kaw by locals.

In 1902, the original Kaw City was founded as a farming community in the fertile oxbow bend of the Arkansas River.  By statehood in 1907, it had 486 inhabitants.

It became a booming oil town in 1919, when ‘black gold’ was discovered nearby.   The population jumped to 1,001 in 1930.

[Not 1000.  1001.]

The majority of the town was overcome by a flood in 1923, and then devastated again by the Great Depression.

In the late 1960s, the Army Corps of Engineers constructed Kaw Dam on the Arkansas River. The original town site went underwater permanently in 1976, when the gates of the Kaw Dam closed.

Many buildings in Kaw City were moved to the town’s present location on high ground near the lake. When the water in the lake is exceptionally low, some of the foundations of the old structures can still be seen just above the water.

Enough Kaw City. How about Webb City?  Wiki:

Webb City (pop 62 in 2010).   Webb City post office opened in 1922.

Horace Webb founded the town in 1910 as an agricultural community.  But the history of Webb City is inexorably linked to oil.

Webb City was located at the northern end of the Burbank Oil Field, discovered in 1920. All mineral rights in Osage County were owned by the Osage tribe.   Although the oil find brought a degree of prosperity, Webb City never developed into a modern town. Water was scarce and there was no electricity. The business district had unpaved streets and most of the buildings were built of wood frame and false fronts.

The town began to decline in the late 1920s, as the oil boom faded. In 1928, it was heavily damaged by a tornado, and many of the businesses did not rebuild. The decline continued through the Great Depression. Its high school closed in 1944.

The 1930 census (the first census taken in Webb City) showed 493 residents. The population has declined thereafter.

Here’s a You Tube video about the town (from Oklahoma Ghost Towns):

 

But now for the pee-ess de ree-sis-tahnce.  Whizbang.  Amazingly, I couldn’t really figure out exactly where the town was  (the location on my local landing map is my best guess).  Wiki said it was 1.5 miles north and 1.5 miles west of Shidler (so, about 2 miles NW of town?).  And, there are no GE Pano shots showing any ruins.  Oh, well.

After checking out a couple of You Tube videos, I realize I needn’t say anything about the town; I’ll just let you see for yourself:  From Oklahoma Ghosttowns:

 

Here’s an OETA (Oklahoma Educational TV) story from Oklahoma News:

 

Time for the only GE Pano shot I could find that was worthy of posting.  (By the by, for such a large lake, there is a total dearth of Pano shots showing Kaw Lake.)  Anyway, I found this, by RoadHunter, taken about 12 miles north of my landing:

pano roadhunter

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Woolstock, Iowa

Posted by graywacke on July 8, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2280; A Landing A Day blog post number 710.

Dan:  Just like my last post (Idalia and Joes, Colorado) – AYKM?  Iowa makes eight, count ‘em, eight OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 760 to 765.  This just ain’t right.

Check out “About Landing (Revisited” to understand the above.  (Or not, your choice .  . . )

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

Hmmm.  Looks like a lot of towns were ignored when I settled on only Woolstock.  More about that later.

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of the White Fox Creek, which makes its way to the Boone River (first hit ever!).  The Boone heads south, and discharges to the Des Moines River (11th hit):

landing 3a

Zooming back a little, and we see that the Des Moines (after briefly forming the boundary between Iowa and Missouri), discharges to the MM (892nd hit).

landing 3b

So, it’s time for my spaceflight in to central Iowa.  Click Here, enjoy the trip, and hit your back button.

I checked out GE Street View, and here’s the look I could get at my landing spot:

ge sv landing map

And here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

I went a few miles to the southwest to get this Street View shot of the White Fox Creek:

ge sv drainage

Just like my last landing in east-central Colorado, I’ve managed to find a pretty-much hookless area.  Look at all the towns on my local landing map!  Of course, I checked them all out, and all I could come up with was in the Wiki entry for Woolstock, where it said that a notable native son was George Reeves.

From Wiki, about George:

George Reeves (1914 – 1959) was an American actor. He is best known for his role as Superman in the 1950s television program Adventures of Superman.

His death at age 45 from a gunshot remains a polarizing topic; the official finding was suicide, but some believe that he was murdered or the victim of an accidental shooting.

Oh my.  The Superman TV show started in 1952.  I was two, and my family didn’t own a TV.  We got our first TV in 1955, and I’m sure I started watching Superman soon thereafter (until the show ended in 1958).   I suspect I watched many reruns back in the day as well.

Here’s the intro, which is totally familiar to me:

 

Here’s a screen shot of a small portion of Google Images for George Reeves:

superman images

And a GE Panoramio shot of his birthplace in Woolstock (by jzsni):

pano jzsni george birthplace

Just thinking about Superman reminded me of one of my all-time favorite songs, “Superman’s Song,” by Crash Test Dummies.  Here’s the music, with the words below.  Please give this your attention!

 

Tarzan wasn’t a ladies’ man
He’d just come along and scoop ’em up under his arm, like that
Quick as a cat
In the jungle

Clark Kent, now there was a real gent
He would not be caught sittin’ around in no junglescape,
Dumb as an ape,
Doing nothing

Chorus:
Superman never made any money
For saving the world from Solomon Grundy
And sometimes I despair the world will never see
Another man like him

Hey Bob, Supe had a straight job
Even though he could have smashed through any bank
In the United States, he had the strength, but he would not

Folks said his family were all dead
Their planet crumbled but Superman, he forced himself
To carry on,
Forget Krypton,
And keep going

Chorus

Tarzan was king of the jungle and Lord over all the apes
But he could hardly string together four words: “I Tarzan, You Jane.”

Sometimes when Supe was stopping crimes
I’ll bet that he was tempted to just quit and turn his back on man,
Join Tarzan in the forest
But he stayed in the city, and kept on changing clothes
In dirty old phonebooths till his work was through
And nothing to do but go on home

Chorus

If you loved the song like me, you’ll want to check out the official video.  Here ‘tis, with an intro by the lead dude, Brad Roberts:

 

This got me to thinking about my all-time favorite song posted on ALAD:  Tex Ritter’s Froggy Went a Courtin’, from my December 2013 Carthage, Texas post (Tex was a native son).  This is a gratuitous opportunity to post it again. Here’s the pertinent excerpt from that post:

Then I stumbled on “Froggy Went a Courtin” and just loved it.  I searched high and low for the lyrics, but couldn’t find the words that fit this You Tube version.  So I did the best I could (the “fee fime oh” verses were all transcribed by me!)

 Anyway, here it comes . . . (the following to be said with an exaggerated hillbilly accent) . . the pee-ess  de ree-sis-tunce.



Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, uh, huh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride, oh, hoh
Froggy went a-courtin’ an-a he did ride
Sword and a pistol by his side
Uh, huh . . . hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Well he went up-a to Miss-a Mousie’s door and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Went up to Miss-a Mousie’s door, hoh
Went up-a to Miss-a Mousie’s door
She said get away you been here before,
Uh, huh . . . ohmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, uh, huh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee, oh
Took a-Missa Mousie on his knee
Well he said Miss Mousie, ‘Will you marry me’
Uh, huh,  hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm.

Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf and a hoh and a hey and a hoh and a hey
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf, uh, huh
Little piece of corn bread a-lyin’ on the shelf
If you want anymore you can sing it yourself
Uh, huh, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm, hmmm

Fee Fime Oh in the land of fear of Pharaoh
Come a rattrap, pennywinkle, tom o’doodle, rattle bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

Kimbo kymbo hey-ho gee-roh
Hey come a rattrap, pollywinkle lolly bugger rattrap
Penny won’t you kime be, oh.

I LOVE THIS!   I’ve listened to it 20 times.  I made sure I got the lyrics just right. . .

 So this froggy song is an old folk song, and I mean old.  Wiki (and other sources) have it as a Scottish folk song originating in 1548.

The song has been covered by countless artists, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Burl Ives, the Brothers Four, Elvis Presley, Bruce Springsteen, and Bob Dylan.

Tex Ritter’s rendition of this song will forever remain one of my all-time favorites . . .

I checked out many GE Panoramio shots near my landing, but I had to wander quite a ways off (about 25 miles to the northeast) to find one I deemed worthy of posting (by Jeromeburg):

pano jeromeburg

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Joes and Idalia, Colorado

Posted by graywacke on July 4, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2279; A Landing A Day blog post number 709.

Dan:  AYKM?  Colorado makes seven, count ‘em, seven OSers in a row.  My Score continues to climb, from 757 to 760.  This just ain’t right.

Check out “About Landing (Revisited” to understand the above.  (Or not; your choice .  . . )

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of Spring Creek, flowing on to the South Fork of the Republican River (2nd hit):

landing 3a

The stippled blue water course just east of my landing (although not labeled) is also Spring Creek.

Zooming back quite a bit:

landing 3b

The S Fk of the Republican goes (unsurprisingly) to the Republican River (24th hit), on to the Kansas (62nd hit); to the Missouri (413th hit); to the MM (891st hit).

It’s time to fasten your seatbelt, and rapidly descend from outer space right to my landing location.  Click HERE to do just that.

Street View coverage near my landing is non-existent.  I wanted to get a look at Spring Creek, but no luck.  Here’s Street View coverage for the S Fk of the Republican:

ge drainage map

There’s a long bridge over the “river,” but here’s the only view with a little of what appears to be water:

ge drainage

I had the orange dude spin around to get a more complete view of the “river.”  Click HERE to check it out.

Before discussing my titular towns, let me zoom out a little for a slightly-more-expanded landing map:

landing 2a

At first my focus was to the south, where the towns are closer to my landing and there are more of them (including the substantial town of Burlington (pop 4,250).  But these towns are incredibly:

aa-hookless

The towns to the north are not much better.  This is my most hookless landing in recent memory – which gives me the opportunity to let my readers know that I never – absolutely never – reject a landing location because I can’t find anything to write about.  The show – er, I mean blog – must go on.

So what is there to say about Idalia (pop 88)?  This, from Wiki:

There are multiple stories of how the name of the town came to be, but the two most prominent are that it was named after the wife of an early settler, Mrs. Edaliah Helmick. The other story is that it was named after the combined names of Ida Hill and Lehia Means.

As is my wont, ALAD will weigh in on the debate.  The first option, about Idalia being named after Edaliah.  I vote a big thumbs down on this one.  If the lady’s name is Edaliah, then the name of the town would be Edaliah!   Having a town named after you is an honor, but the honor loses its luster if they can’t remember how to spell your name (or, insult you by saying that the way your name is spelled just doesn’t cut it. . . )

Plus, my last name it Hill, and I’m all for Cousin Ida and her good friend Lehia combining their names (more or less) and ending up Idalia . . .

Moving on to Joes.  Cool name, but I could find nothing about the name origin.  However, I did find this, from Wiki:

In 1929, the Joes High School basketball team won the Colorado state basketball championship, defeating teams from much larger Colorado towns such as Fort Collins and Denver. The Joes team then traveled to Chicago to participate in a national championship. The smallest school in the tournament, the “Wonder Boys” advanced to the semifinals before losing to Classen High School of Oklahoma City.

The success was notable given the small size of the school. Author Nell Propst, in his book The Boys From Joes (1988) noted that the ten-man basketball team represented half of the male enrollment in the school, which in 1929 numbered 20 boys and 16 girls. Their 1921 high school lacked a gymnasium, forcing the team to practice on a gravel court outside. The school’s coach, Lane Sullivan, knew little about the sport of basketball and gained most of his knowledge from a book he obtained from a college basketball coach in Kansas.

Joes was a repeat Colorado state champ in 1930.

Amazing.  A school with 20 guys comes up with a great b-ball team!

Here’s the book cover (from Amazon.com):

41zdEDd8NvL._SX261_BO1,204,203,200_

There are three Amazon reviews of the book (all 5-star).  Here they are:

amazon reviews

Enough of E-Cen Colorado trivia. It’s time for some GE Panoramio shots.

First this, by Caleb-Shultz, taken about 11 miles N of my landing.

pano caleb-shultz

Keeping with the 11-miles-from-my-landing theme (which includes the distance to the bridge over the South Fork), here’s an artsy shot by James Phillip Dickerson, taken about 11 miles SE of my landing:

pano james phillip dickerson

I’ll close with this by Giu Ann, taken (of course) about 11 miles SW:

pano giu ann

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Owenyo and the Saline Valley, California

Posted by graywacke on June 30, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2278; A Landing A Day blog post number 708.

Dan:  Geez.  California again?!?  California was oversubscribed (OS) for my most recent landing.  Twice in a row?  Now it’s more OS than ever  . . .

This is my 7th California double, and my 59th double overall. 

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map.

landing 2

You see two non-titular towns (Independence and Lone Pine), that I’m not featuring because I featured them in previous posts:

Independence, featured in a August 12, 2009 post.  Type “Independence” in the search box.  There are lots of pretty pictures; it also features a Japanese internment camp, “Manzanar.”

Lone Pine, featured in a February 15, 2009 post.  Type (you guessed it) “Lone Pine” in the search box.  Lots more pretty pictures, and a discussion of a huge 1872 earthquake.

Recently, I featured the Owens Valley (and the 1872 earthquake once again) in my May 2016 Bishop post.  You’re on your own to find it.

So, I decided to feature the town of Owenyo and the adjacent Saline Valley. 

But first, I need to do my watershed analysis, which requires a look at Google Earth.  Click HERE for my GE spaceflight on in to SE California.

It’s obvious that I landed in the mountains, but where does a drop of water end up that falls on my landing? 

Here’s an oblique GE shot, looking west:

ge 1

It’s obvious now that I’m on the eastern slope of the mountain range and in the Saline Valley watershed. 

Here’s another, more local shot (looking northeast, with the Saline Valley in the background):

ge 2

And yet another, looking southeast towards the valley:

ge 3

Here’s the overview:

ge 4

See the whitest area in the Saline Valley?  That’s the low spot where my drainage ends up.  And yes, this was my first landing in the Saline Valley.

More about the Valley later, but I’ll jump over to my titular town, Owenyo.  From Wiki:

Owenyo was an unincorporated community in Inyo County, California.

[Note key word, “was.”]

The town (formerly known as “New Owenyo”) was abandoned in the 1960s, and all that remain now are a few traces of building foundations. There are no standing structures and no inhabitants in or anywhere near Owenyo, which remains on 21st century maps only as a reference point along the bleak, unkempt and itself abandoned Owenyo-Lone Pine Road which runs about two miles east of, and parallel, Highway 395.

[I like the phrase “the bleak, unkempt and itself abandoned . . .”    What a strange word “unkempt” is.  Whoever heard of “kempt??”]

Owenyo’s original townsite was a few miles from its current location.  The town, whose name is a portmanteau of Owens (from Owens Valley) and Inyo (an Indian name for the mountain range just east of town), was originally started by Quaker colonists in 1900.

The Quakers sold out in 1905, when the Carson and Colorado Railroad arrived, establishing the town as a transfer point for freight to be carried by the narrow-gauge railway which began there, serving points southward.

[More about the Quakers later.]

A post office operated at Owenyo from 1902 to 1905 and from 1916 to 1941.  The town moved to its present location in 1910, and for a while was known as New Owenyo on that account.

Here’s a GE shot of all that remains of Owenyo:

ge owenyo

A gentleman name of Bill Cook has photo documented these remains on GE Panoramio.  Here’s the foundation of an erstwhile water tank:

pano bill cook 1

And some railroad ties showing the former railroad-based history of the town:

pano bill cook 2

Bill claims that one can see “traces of the standard gauge Y track” in this photo.  I don’t see anything, but like the shot anyway:

pano bill cook 3

So what about the origins of Owenyo as a Quaker settlement?  What motivated them and why would they pick here?  Evidently, they thought there was plenty of water and that fruit would grow in fertile soils.  Here’s a 1902 advertisement:

old william penn ad

Here’s what the National Park Service says (in an historic write-up about nearby Manzanar internment camp):

The Quakers dug some 42 miles of irrigation canals ranging in width from 18 to 50 feet, but it soon became apparent that the settlers, most of whom were from the East, were unprepared to work the arid lands of Owens Valley.

1901/02 was probably an extraordinarily wet year, and it fooled everyone.  Oh, well.  It seemed like a good idea at the time . . .

Moving over to the Saline Valley.  What I found of most interest was the Saline Valley Salt tram.  Here’s the story (in my own words, but thanks to Death Valley Jim’s write-up on deathvalleyjim.com).

Borax mining began in the Valley in the late 1800s (20-mule team and all that).  The borax was hauled out by wagon, and it was noted by the haulers that a large deposit of salt was in the Valley (at the low spot previously mentioned).  Some of this salt was dug out and hauled out by wagon along with the borax. 

There was a better market for salt than for borax, so for several years, only salt was hauled out.  But hauling expenses remained high, and the project was abandoned. 

In 1902, a Mr. White Smith figured that a tram could be built to move salt more efficiently from the Saline Valley, up and over the Inyo Mountains to Owens Valley, where rail transportation was available.  (Remember Owenyo?).

So a tram was built (although it didn’t go into operation until 1913).  It ran continuously for two years, and then intermittently afterward.  Here’s a picture of some remaining tram towers from Death Valley Jim’s webite:

death valley jim aerial tram

He tells a heck of a story about the tram (with lots of great pictures), and I recommend that you go to his website.   Click HERE to check it out.

I’ll close with this shot of the low point of Saline Valley, with some rare water actually in the playa (GE Panoramio shot by SierraBasin):

pano sierrabasin low point, saline valley

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Daggett and Newberry Springs, California

Posted by graywacke on June 26, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2277; A Landing A Day blog post number 707.

Dan:  This is my 5th landing in California (out of 61 since I changed my random lat/long process).  5/61 =  8.2%  The percentage of California’s area of the area of the lower 48?  5.3%.  Guess what?  CA is oversubscribed (OS), so my score went up from 750 to 754.  This is my 5th OSer in a row!  Enough already!

Confused about the above paragraph?  Care?  Check out “About Landing (Revisited), above.  Don’t care?  Just keep reading . . .

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

 

And my local landing map:

landing 2

This is another one of those desert landings where StreetAtlas shows no stream information, so I’ll move right along to my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight in to S-Cen California.  Click HERE, enjoy the flight, then hit your back button.

So how about my watershed?  Well, using the GE topography tool, it was apparent that drainage headed north from my landing.  So, I started looking for a culvert or bridge under I-40.  Bingo:

ge sv crest wash

I love it when the DOT cares enough to name waterways!  So, I landed in the watershed of Crest Wash.

Looking upstream towards my landing:

ge sv crest wash up stream

Looking downstream:

ge sv crest wash down stream

 

To see where the Crest Wash goes, I’ll repeat my local landing map:

landing 2

See the stippled blue swath?  That’s the Mojave River.  Here’s a watershed map (Wiki, by K Musser):

Mojaverivermap

I traced the river’s path on GE.  I made it red because there’s practically never any water in it:

ge mojave river map

Check out this SV from a bridge over the river just north of my landing:

ge sv mojave r

From Wiki, about the Mojave:

Near its terminus, the Mojave River flows out onto a large inland delta called the Mojave River Wash. During heavy flows, the river reaches Soda Lake near Baker at the north end of the Wash, and has reached Silver Lake, even further north, in historic times. For example, during the unusually wet winter of 2004–2005, the Mojave River flowed on the surface all the way to Silver Lake and filled both Soda and Silver Lakes to a depth of several feet.

So, I had to find a picture with the Mojave actually flowing.  Here’s a shot of the railroad bridge at Daggett (BridgeHunter.com by Nicholas Webster).  I’ll say it’s flowing!:

bridgehunter.com by Nicholas Webster

Time to take a look at Daggett.  From Wiki:

The town was originally founded in the 1880s just after the discovery of silver in the mines near Calico to the north.  And later on in 1891, Francis Marion Smith the ‘Borax King’ moved down to Daggett from Death Valley’s Harmony Borax Works to install mining operations at a borax camp called Borate, which was located about three miles east of Calico and the former silver mines.  The borax was hauled by the soon-to-be-famous 20 Mule Team.

Daggett became quite a big city in the 1890s, boasting three stores, two restaurants, three saloons, three hotels, a lumberyard, and even a Chinese eating place. In the mid 1890s, the silver price crashed, and Daggett began to decline.  After 1911, when richer borax deposits were discovered north of Daggett in Death Valley, all the mining operations were moved up there which accelerated Daggett’s decline, which continues even to this day.

Here’s a shot of the 20 mule team:

20_Mule_Team_in_Death_Valley

20 Mule Team Borax was (and still is, I think) a laundry product:

Borax-20MuleTeam-7860c

Borax is an evaporite mineral, formed by mineral-rich water that evaporates.  I collected a sample during a geology field trip to Death Valley (back in ’72) that I still have somewhere.  Here’s what borax looks like:

800px-Borax_crystals

I remember the TV show Death Valley Days, with Ronald Reagan as host and 20 Mule Team Borax as the sponsor.  Here’s a TV commercial from the show:

So, the old mining town Calico is mentioned above.  From Calico Ghost Town website:

Calico is an old West mining town that was founded in 1881 due to the largest silver strike in California.  With its 500 mines, Calico produced over $20 million in silver ore over a 12-year span.  When silver lost its value in the mid-1890’s, Calico lost its population.  The miners packed up, loaded their mules and moved away abandoning the town that once gave them a good living.  It became a “ghost town.”

Walter Knott [of Knott’s Berry Farm fame] purchased Calico in the 1950s, architecturally restoring many original buildings to look as they did in the 1880s.  Calico received State Historical Landmark status and in 2005 was proclaimed by then Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to be California’s official Silver Rush Ghost Town.

It’s quite the tourist attraction now, with well over 100 Panoramio shots.  But here’s a shot from BackpackerVerse.com:

Calico-Ghost-Town-Title

Here’s another from Rick & Lynn Edwards Photography:

rick and lynn edwards photography

Time to move on to Newberry Springs.  Wiki:

The original name of Newberry Springs was “Water”.

[I love it!  And wish they never changed the name to Newberry Springs . . . ]

Since its earliest days the area in and around Newberry Springs has been a source of water for the surrounding arid region.

And then Wiki also had this to say:

The motion picture Bagdad Café was filmed in the area and the truck stop featured in the film still exists as a working motel and restaurant.

Bagdad Café is one of my all-time favorite movies (right up there with The Graduate).  Here’s a GE shot showing the location of the café:

ge sv bagdad cafe map

Wiki:

Bagdad Café is a 1987 comedy set in a remote truck-stop café and motel in the Mojave Desert.

German tourist Jasmin and her husband fight whilst they are driving across the desert. She storms out of the car and makes her way to the isolated truck stop, which is run by the tough-as-nails and short-tempered Brenda (C. C. H. Pounder), whose own husband, after an argument out front, is soon to leave as well.  Jasmin takes a room at the adjacent motel. Initially suspicious of the foreigner, Brenda eventually befriends Jasmin and allows her to work at the café.

The café is visited by an assortment of colorful characters, including a strange ex-Hollywood set-painter (Jack Palance) and a glamorous tattoo artist. Brenda’s son plays J. S. Bach preludes on the piano. With an ability to quietly empathize with everyone she meets at the café, helped by a passion for cleaning and performing magic tricks, Jasmin gradually transforms the café and all the people in it.

The character development and cinematography are excellent.  I LOVE THIS MOVIE!  Here’s the trailer:

 

Here’s what the café looks like today (Wiki):

800px-Bagdad_Cafe._(4054050230)

And the neighboring hotel (also part of the movie – Pano shot by Schmit Serge):

pano bc schmit serge

And the trailer and water tower behind the café (Pano by Jean Louis Capdeville):

pano jean louis capdeville

Here’s a Route 66 shot looking west past the motel sign (by Dom199).  My landing is off to the left:

pano Dom199

Time for some pretty scenery.  First this by Jimbo4110, 7 miles E of my landing:

pano jimbo4110 7 mi E

And this, by PorkPhoto of Kane Springs (near Newberry Springs):

pano Porkphoto Kane Springs 3.5 mi NE

And I’ll close with this shot by SocalSoul, 5 miles E:

pano socalsoul 5 mi E

 

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Lochiel, Arizona

Posted by graywacke on June 22, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2276; A Landing A Day blog post number 706.

Dan:  Geez.  My fourth OSer in a row, thanks to my fourth landing in Arizona since I changed my lat/long methodology.  My Score (which should be marching steadily downwards) went up from 747 to 750.  Clueless & curious?  Check out About Landing (Revisited) above.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map.

landing 2

In an unusual twist for ALAD, I’m not going to bother with a streams-only map (because it shows essentially northing).  Instead, we’ll head straight to my Google Earth (GE) spaceflight from who-knows-where to the Arizona-Mexico border.  Clilck HERE and enjoy the trip (then hit your back button).

Before talking about my watershed analysis, here’s an oblique GE shot (looking SW) of my landing location:

ge 1

I followed my drainage pathway for miles and miles including quite the jaunt in Mexico.  I figured out that I landed in the Santa Cruz River watershed (first landing ever!).  Here’sa Santa Cruz River watershed map (Wiki) that shows my approximate landing location:

Santa_Cruz_River_Arizona_Map

As you can see, the Santa Cruz discharges into the Gila (or, as discussed below, used to discharge into the Gila).  This is my 38th hit for the Gila, on to the Colorado (178th hit).

Note that the above map points out the Nogales International Sewage Treatment Plant.  More about that later.

Here’s a GE shot that shows the southern portion of the river course, dipping well south into Mexico:

ge santa cruz

By the way, this is only the second time my watershed analysis had something to do with Mexico (my Yuma AZ landing was even closer to the border, and my drainage headed south to an internally-drained playa in Mexico).

To learn a little more about the river, here’s a June 2012 piece from the Environmental Defense Fund, “Celebrating Arizona’s Rivers”:

The 210-mile Santa Cruz originates in the San Rafael Valley of southeastern Arizona, where it flows south through one of the last remaining expanses of a unique grassland ecosystem interspersed with oak woodlands. By the time it crosses into Mexico, 15 miles south of its headwaters, the river supports abundant streamside vegetation surrounded by mesquite bosques (forests). In Mexico, the Santa Cruz makes a 25 mile U-turn through Sonora and returns to the U.S. just east of the cities of Nogales, Sonora, and Nogales, Arizona.

As the river approaches the border it is transformed into an ever-diminishing creek until it disappears altogether, the result of groundwater pumping that has dropped the water table and thus dried the river’s surface flow. Just north of the border, the river’s year-round flow and cottonwood-willow forest return due to an inflow of treated wastewater (effluent) from the Nogales International Wastewater Treatment Plant.

So groundwater pumping is the culprit, eh?  Since I’m a hydrogeologist (a scientist who specializes in groundwater flow and contamination), I’ll have to do a little ‘splainin’.  Here’s a cross section showing both a “gaining” stream and a “losing” stream:

gaining losing

For the gaining stream, the watertable is above the level of the stream, and groundwater flows into the stream, sustaining (and increasing) the streamflow.  This is the way it used to be the Santa Cruz.  Then, if and when the watertable drops, water flows out of the stream.  This, of course, diminishes the streamflow, which is exactly what happened to the poor Santa Cruz.

Of course, I looked for my first opportunity for a GE Street View (SV) shot of the Santa Cruz.  I found a spot near Nogales about 10 miles west of my landing:

ge sv sc map

Here’s what the Orange Dude sees (first a close-up, confirming that, in fact, I did find the Santa Cruz):

ge sv sc1

Here’s the downstream view:

ge sv sc2

I then wanted to look at the area downstream from the Nogales International Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) where the river flows, thanks to the treated wastewater:

ge nogales

Here’s what the Orange Dude sees, looking downstream:

ge nogales sv

And looking upstream:

ge nogales sv2

There you have it.  Time to move on Lochiel.  From Wiki:

Lochiel is a ghost town and former border crossing. The townsite is located in the San Rafael Valley about 1.5 miles west of the Santa Cruz River.  It was first settled in the late-1870s and mostly abandoned by 1986.

The town served the ranches of the San Rafael Valley and the Washington Camp and Duquesne mining towns of the Patagonia Mountains about five miles to the northwest [in the mountains near my landing].

By 1881,the town was home to some 400 people, most of whom worked in the smelter or in the mines, as well as five stores, three saloons, a brewery, a butcher shop, a bakery, livery stables, and a boarding house.

What about the name?  Continuing with Wiki:

The present-day Lochiel was originally known by local Mexican settlers as La Noria, which is Spanish for a wheel-drawn well, and later as Luttrell (after an early settler), before being renamed “Lochiel” by the rancher Colin Cameron in 1884.

Colin Cameron is of Scottish ancestry, and is of the Clan Cameron.  Lochiel is the main branch of Clan Cameron, and the basis for the town’s name.

Who’d a thunk?  A Mexico border town named after a Scottish Highlander Clan.  Here’s another interesting twist:

In the late 1880s, the international boundary between Sonora and Arizona was surveyed and it was found that half of the settlement was in Mexican territory. The town was then split in two. La Noria became the name of the Mexican part of town while the American side continued to be known as Lochiel.

And finishing up:

A few people still live in Lochiel to this day [almost all with the surname of . In addition to a collection of old houses, Lochiel is the site of a one-room schoolhouse, a teacherage, an old adobe church, and an abandoned U.S. Customs station.

Lochiel is also the site where Fray Marcos de Niza first entered what is now Arizona.  A large memorial just to the west of town was erected in his honor in 1939 by the National Youth Administration.

I found an article from NagolesInternational.com, entitled “Ghost Border Town Isn’t Dead Yet.”  Here’s a quote (after the article introduces Ramon De La Ossa, one of the local residents):

Lochiel’s history can’t be told without the De la Ossas. They were among its first settlers and now, nearly 140 years after it was founded and first named Luttrell, they are nearly every single one of its inhabitants.

Ramon’s paternal grandparents, Antonio and Carolina De la Ossa, first came to Lochiel in 1880 from California, with the original plan being to push on to Guaymas, Sonora with their freight business and several children in tow. Carolina got to Lochiel and insisted that not another step be taken, Ramon said.

“My grandmother got tired of travelling,” he said. “They were in a covered wagon. And she said, ‘That’s it, right here.’”

To check out the entire article (which is well worth the read), click HERE.

More about Fray (Friar) deNiza (and his monument in Lochiel) in a minute.  First, here’s a GE Panoramio shot of the school and teacher’s house by Outwest63:

pano outwest 63

Here’s a Pano shot of the old border crossing building by WBaron (the border is right behind the photographer):

pano wbaron border crossing building

Speaking of the border crossing, here’s a GE shot of the border:

ge border 1

For the record, I’m not sure why the US is green and Mexico is brown.  I assume there are different photos on each side of the border.  

Here’s a Pano shot of the fence, by AZOffRoad:

pano az off road border fence

And this shot demonstrating the security of the fence, by JR Holeman:

pano jr holeman

Appropriate name for the photographer, eh?  Apparently, he just turned around after shooting the hole in the fence and took this great shot:

pano jr holeman 2

I’ll finish up by looking a little deeper into Fray Marcos de Niza.  First, here’s a Pano shot by Outwest63 of the monument mentioned above:

pano outwest 63 2

And the plaque at the monument (also by Outwest63):

pano outwest 63 3

I found an article from the Planetary Science Institute, entitled “The Mysterious Journey of Friar Marcos de Niza.”

Marcos de Niza was a priest who was sent north from Mexico City by Viceroy Mendoza in 1538-39 to search for wealthy cities that were rumored to be somewhere north of the frontier of New Spain.

In early 1539 he journeyed north into the unknown for several months. In the summer of 1539 he returned and wrote a report saying he had discovered the cities – in a province he called Cibola (the present-day native American pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico). He said he reached the first city and saw it from a distance, but because his companion had been killed there, he returned without entering it.

Most popular writers claim Marcos reported gold in Cibola, but his original report says nothing about gold. Nonetheless, conquistadors in Mexico City were excited by his news and assumed Cibola would be as wealthy as the conquered Aztec empire. Marcos led Coronado’s army back to Cibola the next year, but he became the scapegoat when Cibola turned out to have no gold, and the soldiers said he was a liar.

The big mystery about Marcos is whether he told the truth. Historians have argued for centuries about whether Marcos – a priest with a good reputation – simply interviewed some natives near the present border, and turned back without seeing Cibola. Also at issue: did he promote the rumors that Cibola was full of gold? Several prominent 20th century historians concluded Marcos did not have time to reach Cibola in 1539. They said he made up a fraudulent report as part of a conspiracy with Viceroy Mendoza to encourage the conquest of the north. Other historians have defended him.

A little-known monument near the small town of Lochiel, Arizona, commemorates the place where Marcos de Niza crossed from Mexico into the present United States in 1539. The exact location of this crossing is unknown, but it is likely that he was following the Santa Cruz River valley on his trip north, and that he passed within a few miles of the spot.

Before wrapping up with some Pano shots local to my landing, here’s a YouTube by 2at018 of a motorcycle trip headed south down the lonely dirt road to Lochiel:

Here’s a shot of the same dirt road looking south across the Mexican Border, by AZOffRoad, taken less than a mile from my landing:

pano az off road 2

Here’s a great shot down in the valley about 4 miles SE of my landing by Arizona Bob:

pano arizona bob

I’ll close with this sunset shot about 3 miles SE, by Kneup76:

pano kneup76

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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Tipton, Iowa

Posted by graywacke on June 17, 2016

First timer?  In this formerly once-a-day blog (and now pretty much a once-every-four-or-five days blog), I have my computer select a random latitude and longitude that puts me somewhere in the continental United States (the lower 48).  I call this “landing.”  I keep track of the watersheds I land in, as well as the town I land near.  I do some internet research to hopefully find something of interest about my landing location.  To find out more about A Landing A Day (like who “Dan” is) please see “About Landing” above.  To check out some recent changes in how I do things, check out “About Landing (Revisited).”

Landing number 2275; A Landing A Day blog post number 705.

Dan:  Yet another OSer (third in a row) as I landed in Iowa.  My Score went up from 743 to 747.

Here’s my regional landing map:

landing 1

And my local landing map:

landing 2a

Just to put Tipton into context, here’s a broader landing map, showing proximity to Iowa City, Cedar Rapids and Davenport:

landing 2b

My streams-only map shows that I landed in the watershed of Bennett Creek:

landing 3a

Bennett Creek flows to Sugar Creek, and on to the Cedar River (4th hit).  OK, so the above map doesn’t show the Sugar flowing to the Cedar.  You’ll have to trust me.

Zooming back:

landing 3b

The Cedar flows to the Iowa (11th hit), and on to the MM (889th hit).

It’s time for my Google Earth (GE) descent from the heavens to E-Cen Iowa.  Click HERE, enjoy the trip, then hit your back button.

Not bad GE Street View (SV) coverage:

ge sv landing map

Here’s what the orange dude sees:

ge sv landing

Moving just a little west on the same road, the orange guy has this view of an unnamed tributary to Bennett Creek (where runoff from my landing would go):

ge sv ut

Going well south (and downstream), here’s a view of Sugar Creek just before it discharges into the Cedar River:

ge sv sugar

And very close to the Sugar Creek confluence, here’s a SV shot of the quite substantial Cedar River:

ge sv cedar

So what about Tipton?  It’s pretty much hookless, although the town’s website has a cool home page:

website banner

At the bottom of the Wiki entry, there was one name listed under Notable Residents:  Gus Monckmeier, who was identified as a race car driver and inventor.  His name was in blue, which means that he has a Wiki entry:

Gustav “Gus” Monckmeier (1888 – 1962) was a German-American racing car driver and inventor. Today he is best known for his participation in the 1911 and 1912 1,000-plus-mile Around-Lake-Michigan Reliability races.  In 1961, he recreated one of the Reliability races, driving with a reporter for the Chicago Daily Tribune.

The article mentions that he drove exclusively for Staver Carriage Company.  I found this from WestCoastAutoEnthusiasts.com:

From 1910 to 1913, life was good at the Staver Carriage Co. Staver was building on three chassis, four different body styles.  The large Greyhound 65 had a powerful 71hp inline 6 and could seat four people.  Staver were becoming famous in the racing scene thanks in large to their premier company driver, Gus Monckmeier.

staver-651

The Greyhound 65

In 1913, Staver had reached his pinnacle in the automobile business.  The following 12 months showed a steady decline in models offered.  Key innovators began to seek employment outside of the Staver business, which was devastating to the company.  One bright spot was the record-breaking performance of the Staver 65s at the Newport Indiana Hill Climb with Monckmeier  at the wheel.

Here’s a picture of the site of the Newport Hill Climb (1909):

newport indiana hill climb

And a Detroit public library picture of Gus & crew (with the caption below):

detroit public library

View of G. Monckmeier and passengers in Staver car on rural road near Kalamazoo, Michigan during the 1912 reliability contest sponsored by the Chicago Motor Club. Contestants circled Lake Michigan, passing through Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana.

Here’s a pic of Gus flyin’ around a corner at the 1910 Elgin Nationals:

Fox_River

And this shot, from Wiki (with Gus on the left):

Monckmeier_and_Latham_at_Elgin_1911

Here’s the October 12, 1912 edition of Motor Age.  Gus and his crew are in the middle picture:

Motor_Age_cover_1912

Staver Carriage Company, eh?  Of course, I never heard of it.  I found a list of defunct American automobile manufacturers, and there were hundreds and hundreds of them.  Here’s a tiny sampling:

staver

If you wanted to buy a new car back in around 1900 – 1920, it must have been head-spinning to sort out all of the choices (although I suspect most were very local).

Wiki said that Gus was an inventor.  I’ll say.  Here’s a partial list of his patented inventions:

US 1481382 “Piston-ring extractor”
US 1627401 “Wear-compensating bolt”
US 1646416 “Automatic thrust bearing”
US 1829940 “Screw clamping device with automatic clamping means”
US 1823461 “Thrust bearing scraping tool”
US 1971078 “Bearing cap finishing device”
US 2798741 “Coupler with a pair of pivoted jaws and automatic latching means”
US 1977734 “Luggage and trunk carrier”
US 2632629 “Pawl actuated cable lift”
US 2259390 “Clothes drier”
US 2148242 “Automobile bumper post”
US 2195280 “Variable drive sprocket wheel for bicycles”
US 1825410 “Automatic take up bearing”

They’re all automotive inventions, except for “Clothes Drier.”  I wonder if he made any money with that one?

I’ll close with this GE Panoramio shot by Grant Groberg, taken less than a mile NW of my landing (entitled “Space Silo”):

pano grant groberg

I doubt that the farmer intended this to look like the Space Shuttle rocket and booster engines . . .

That’ll do it . . .

KS

Greg

 

© 2016 A Landing A Day

 

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